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  1. added 2019-01-09
    What is in the Mirror? The Metaphysics of Mirror Images in Albert the Great and Peter Auriol.Lukas Licka - forthcoming - In Brian Glenney & José Silva (eds.), The Senses and the History of Philosophy. London: Routledge. pp. 131-148.
  2. added 2018-12-31
    Ockham on Awareness of One’s Acts: A Way Out of the Circle.Sonja Schierbaum - 2018 - Society and Politics 12 (2):08-27.
    In this paper, I proceed from the assumption that Ockham’s account of self-awareness can be correctly described as a kind of higher-order approach, because just like modern higher-order theorists, Ockham accounts for a mental act being conscious in terms of a higher-order act that takes the act as its object. I aim to defend Ockham’s approach against the objection that it fails to provide an explanation of how self-awareness comes about because any such explanation would be circular. Part of the (...)
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  3. added 2018-12-31
    Preface: Remembering Consciousness.Martin Klein & Oliver Istvan Toth - 2018 - Society and Politics 12 (2):05-07.
    This issue is dedicated to consciousness in medieval and early modern philosophy of mind. It aims to shed new light on the continuities and innovations during the transition from medieval to early modern philosophy of mind. The four papers, by Sonja Schierbaum, Daniel Schmal, Oliver Istvan Toth, and Philipp N. Müller, focus on consciousness and, more specifically, on one of its less frequently considered aspects: memory.
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  4. added 2018-12-31
    Intellectual Memory and Consciousness in Descartes’s Philosophy of Mind.Dániel Schmal - 2018 - Society and Politics 12 (2):28-49.
    Although Descartes’s ideas regarding consciousness and memory have been studied extensively, few attempts have been made to address their systemic relations. In order to redress this deficiency, I argue in favor of three interrelated theses. The first is that intellectual memory has a crucial role to play in Descartes’s concept of consciousness, especially when it comes to explaining higher forms of consciousness. Second, the connection between memory and consciousness has been obscured by the fact that intellectual memory, taken as a (...)
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  5. added 2018-12-21
    Can We Reflexively Access the Contents of Our Own Perceptions? Ockham on the Reflexive Cognition of the Contents of Intuitions.Lydia Deni Gamboa - forthcoming - British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-20.
  6. added 2018-12-18
    El conocimiento teológico natural y la teoría del maestro interior en Tomás de Aquino.Javier Eduardo Perna - manuscript
    En la teoría epistémica de Tomás de Aquino la lumen rationis desempeña la función de causa última del inventario completo del conocimiento humano natural. La tesis de acuerdo a la cual esa luz es puesta en nosotros por Dios justifica, de acuerdo al autor, la aserción de que la divinidad es el único y auténtico maestro interior del hombre. Ahora bien, en la visión beatífica la lumen naturale es perfeccionada por una luz sobrenatural, y la unión cognitiva con lo conocido (...)
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  7. added 2018-12-18
    El Teólogo y el búho. La teología aenigmatica de Tomás de Aquino.Javier Eduardo Perna - manuscript
    A lo largo de la obra de Tomás de Aquino es posible encontrar cierta tensión textual en torno a la posibilidad de conocer de manera natural la esencia divina. Por un lado el teólogo parece afirmar que, precisamente, no podemos conocer acerca de Dios qué es, sino solo qué no es. Pero, por otra parte, existe evidencia textual de que habría sostenido la posibilidad de un conocimiento quiditativo imperfecto. En tanto y en cuanto el matiz más positivo suele aparecer con (...)
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  8. added 2018-09-22
    Marking the Boundaries: Animals in Medieval Latin Philosophy.Juhana Toivanen - 2018 - In Peter Adamson & Fey Edwards (eds.), Animals: A History. Oxford, UK: pp. 121-150.
    The medieval reception of Aristotle’s theory of animals was rich and multifaceted and included reflection on his psychological theories but also, for instance, his claim that humans are “political animals.” A particular problem for the medievals was demarcating animals, that is, specifying the dividing line between animal and human. This is especially the case given the sophisticated capacities they ascribe to animals, while still retaining a hard and fast distinction between humans as rational and animals as irrational. Authors discussed in (...)
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  9. added 2018-09-22
    Entre la raison et la perception: La psychologie animale médiévale et la relation entre les humains et les animaux.Juhana Toivanen - 2018 - In M. Cutino, I. Iribarren & F. Vinel (eds.), La Restauration de la création: Quelle place pour les animaux? Leiden, Netherlands: pp. 275-297.
  10. added 2018-09-22
    Perceptual Experience: Assembling a Medieval Puzzle.Juhana Toivanen - 2018 - In Margaret Cameron (ed.), Philosophy of Mind in the Early and High Middle Ages: The History of the Philosophy of Mind, Volume 2. London, UK: pp. 134-156.
  11. added 2018-09-19
    Some Later Medieval Responses to the Paradox of Learning.Martin Pickavé - 2016 - In Thomas Jeschke & Andreas Speer (eds.), Schüler Und Meister. Berlin: De Gruyter. pp. 21-44.
  12. added 2018-09-19
    Emotion and Cognitive Life in Medieval and Early Modern Philosophy.Martin Pickavé & Lisa Shapiro (eds.) - 2012 - Oxford University Press.
    This volume explores emotion in medieval and early modern thought, and opens a contemporary debate on the way emotions figure in our cognitive lives.
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  13. added 2018-09-19
    On the Intentionality of the Emotions (and of Other Appetitive Acts).Martin Pickavé - 2010 - Quaestio 10:45-63.
    In recent philosophical debates about the nature of human emotions the intentionality of emotions plays a key part. The article explores how medieval philosophers of the late 13th and early 14th centuries accounted for the fact that our emotions, such as love, hate, anger and the like, are intentional mental states, states that are ‘of’ or ‘about something’. Since medieval philosophers agree that emotions are essentially movements of the appetitive powers, the intentionality of emotions is part of the broader problem (...)
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  14. added 2018-06-22
    Perception and the Internal Senses: Peter of John Olivi on the Cognitive Functions of the Sensitive Soul.Juhana Toivanen - 2013 - Leiden, Netherlands: Brill.
    In Perception and the Internal Senses Juhana Toivanen offers a philosophical reconstruction of Peter of John Olivi’s (ca. 1248-98) conception of the cognitive psychology of the sensitive or animal soul.
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  15. added 2018-06-01
    “Many Know Much but Do Not Know Themselves”: Self-Knowledge, Humility, and Perfection in the Medieval Affective Contemplative Tradition.Christina Van Dyke - 2018 - Proceedings of the Society for Medieval Logic and Metaphysics 14 (Consciousness and Self-Knowledge):89-106.
    Today, philosophers interested in self-knowledge usually look to the scholastic tradition, where the topic is addressed in a systematic and familiar way. Contemporary conceptions of what medieval figures thought about self-knowledge thus skew toward the epistemological. In so doing, however, they often fail to capture the crucial ethical and theological importance that self-knowledge possesses throughout the Middle Ages. -/- Human beings are not transparent to themselves: in particular, knowing oneself in the way needed for moral progress requires hard and rigorous (...)
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  16. added 2018-06-01
    Self-Knowledge, Abnegation, and Ful Llment in Medieval Mysticism.Christina Van Dyke - 2016 - In Ursula Renz (ed.), Self-Knowledge. Oxford University Press. pp. 131-145.
    Self-knowledge is a persistent—and paradoxical—theme in medieval mysticism, which portrays our ultimate goal as union with the divine. Union with God is often taken to involve a cognitive and/or volitional merging that requires the loss of a sense of self as distinct from the divine. Yet affective mysticism—which emphasizes the passion of the incarnate Christ and portrays physical and emotional mystical experiences as inherently valuable—was in fact the dominant tradition in the later Middle Ages. An examination of both the affective (...)
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  17. added 2018-06-01
    Aquinas’s Shiny Happy People: Perfect Happiness and the Limits of Human Nature.Christina Van Dyke - 2014 - In Oxford Studies in the Philosophy of Religion. pp. 269-291.
    In Aquinas's account of the beatific vision, human beings are joined to God in a never-ending act of contemplation of the divine essence: a state which utterly fulfills the human drive for knowledge and satisfies every desire of the human heart. In this paper, I argue that this state represents less a fulfillment of human nature, however, than a transcendence of that nature. Furthermore, what’s transcended is not incidental on a metaphysical, epistemological, or moral level.
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  18. added 2018-03-11
    Linguistic Apprehension as Incidental Sensation in Thomas Aquinas.Daniel D. De Haan - 2010 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 84:179-196.
    In this paper I will delineate the psychological operations and faculties required for linguistic apprehension within a Thomistic psychology. This will require first identifying the proper object of linguistic apprehension, which will then allow me to specify the distinct operations and faculties necessary for linguisticapprehension. I will argue that the semantic value of any linguistic term is a type of incidental sensible and that its cognitive apprehension is a type of incidentalsensation. Hence, the faculties necessary for the apprehension of any (...)
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  19. added 2018-03-01
    Perceptual Self-Awareness in Seneca, Augustine, and Olivi.Juhana Toivanen - 2013 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 51 (3):355-382.
    This article traces the philosophical idea of self-perception from the times of ancient Stoicism to the thirteenth century by analyzing the views of Seneca, Augustine, and Olivi. The central argument is that they defend the same idea according to which self-preservation and the appropriate use of one’s body requires awareness thereof, despite the obvious contextual differences and the uncertainty of direct historical connections between the authors. They think that this kind of self-awareness does not belong only to human beings, because (...)
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  20. added 2018-02-17
    Peter Olivi on Human Self-Knowledge: A Reassessment.Dominic Whitehouse - 2014 - Franciscan Studies 72:173-224.
  21. added 2018-02-17
    Diachronically Unified Consciousness in Augustine and Aquinas.Therese Scarpelli Cory - 2012 - Vivarium 50 (3-4):354-381.
    Medieval accounts of diachronically unifed consciousness have been overlooked by contemporary readers, because medieval thinkers have a unique and unexpected way of setting up the problem. This paper examines the approach to diachronically unified consciousness that is found in Augustine’s and Aquinas’s treatments of memory. For Augustine, although the mind is “distended” by time, it remains resilient, stretching across disparate moments to unify past, present, and future in a single personal present. Despite deceptively different phrasing, Aquinas develops a remarkably similar (...)
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  22. added 2018-02-17
    Études de Philosophie Antique Et Médiévale. Dossier Thomas d'Aquin.Elena Băltuţă - 2009 - Chôra 7:315-332.
    Im Folgenden werde ich einige der möglichen Interpretationen der thomistischen Intentionalitätstheorie darstellen. Zuerst werde ich die Mechanismen der menschlichen Erkenntnis und der Beziehung zwischen phantasmata, species sensibile und species intelligibile bei Thomas von Aquin beschreiben. Danachwerde ich die verschiedenen Interpretationen des Problems der Intentionalität bei Thomas darstellen; genauer gesagt geht es um drei reduktive Interpretationenund eine nicht-reduktive. Am Ende dieses Beitrags werde ich mich für eine dieser Interpretationen entscheiden und meine Gründe dafür angeben.
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  23. added 2018-02-06
    Attention, Perceptual Content, and Mirrors: Two Medieval Models of Active Perception in Peter Olivi and Peter Auriol.Lukáš Lička - 2017 - Perception in Scholastics and Their Interlocutors.
    In the paper I argue that medieval philosophers proposed several notions of the senses’ activity in perception. I illustrate the point using the example of two Franciscan thinkers – Peter Olivi (ca. 1248–1298) and Peter Auriol (ca. 1280–1322). Olivi’s notion of active perception assumes that every perceptual act demands a prior focusing of the mind’s attention. Furthermore, Olivi is partially inspired by the extramissionist theories of vision and reinterprets the notion of a visual ray postulated by them as a useful (...)
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  24. added 2017-11-17
    Les éléments nouveaux de psychopathologie dans la lettre de Witelo.J. Burchardt - 1983 - Bulletin de Philosophie Medievale 25:138-142.
  25. added 2017-11-04
    The Mirror of Language.Marcia L. Colish - 1968 - New Haven: Yale University Press.
  26. added 2017-11-03
    Cognition.Giorgio Pini - 2016 - In Charles F. Briggs & Peter Eardley (eds.), A Companion to Giles of Rome. Leiden: Brill. pp. 150-172.
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  27. added 2017-11-03
    Two Models of Thinking: Thomas Aquinas and Duns Scotus on Occurrent Thoughts.Giorgio Pini - 2015 - In Gyula Klima (ed.), Intentionality, Cognition, and Mental Representation in Medieval Philosophy. New York, USA: Fordham University Press. pp. 81-103.
    Even though Scotus did not develop his account in direct opposition to Aquinas, a contrast between these two thinkers helps us to focus on some distinctive features of their respective approaches and on some characteristic moves they made to answer the question, “What is it to think?” Scotus agreed with Aquinas that, barring divine intervention, an intelligible species must be received in the intellect prior to the production of an occurrent thought about a thing’s essence. Unlike Aquinas, however, Scotus argued (...)
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  28. added 2017-11-03
    Scotus on Objective Being.Giorgio Pini - 2015 - Documenti E Studi Sulla Tradizione Filosofica Medievale 26:81-103.
    Scotus’s views on objective being — i.e. the special way objects of thought are supposed to be in the mind — have been recently interpreted in different ways. In this paper, I argue that Scotus’s apparently contradictory statements on objective being can be made sense only if they are read against the background of his theory of essence. Specifically, I claim that a key point of Scotus’s position is that objects of thoughts are in the mind but have mind-independent identity (...)
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  29. added 2017-11-03
    Scotus on Intuitive and Abstractive Cognition.Giorgio Pini - 2014 - In Jeffrey P. Hause (ed.), Medieval Philosophy: Essential Readings and Contemporary Responses. London: Routledge. pp. 348-365.
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  30. added 2017-10-13
    Book Review: Intellectual Traditions at the Medieval University: The Use of Philosophical Psychology in Trinitarian Theology Among the Franciscans and Dominicans, 1250-1350, Written by Russell L. Friedman. [REVIEW]Scott M. Williams - 2015 - Vivarium 53 (1):123-125.
  31. added 2017-10-13
    Anonymus, Quaestio de delectatione intellectuali determinata in quodlibeto Lipsiensi A. D. 1450.Hans-Ulrich Wöhler - 2012 - Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 15 (1):181-199.
  32. added 2017-10-13
    Köln: „Wissen über Grenzen: Arabisches Wissen und lateinisches Mittelalter".David Wirmer - 2004 - Bulletin de Philosophie Medievale 46:266-277.
  33. added 2017-10-12
    Three Senses of Intuitive Cognition: A Quodlibetal Question of Harvey of Nedellec.R. G. Wengert - 1983 - Franciscan Studies 43 (1):408-431.
  34. added 2017-10-12
    The Sources of Intuitive Cognition in William of Ockham.R. G. Wengert - 1981 - Franciscan Studies 41 (1):415-447.
  35. added 2017-10-07
    Issues in Medieval Philosophy Essays in Honor of Richard C. Dales.Nancy Van Deusen & Richard C. Dales - 2001
  36. added 2017-10-07
    Studies in Medieval Philosophy. Edited by John F. Wippel.Fernand Van Steenberghen - 1988 - Revue Philosophique De Louvain 86 (70):237-239.
  37. added 2017-10-03
    Knowledge and the Sciences in Medieval Philosophy Proceedings of the Eighth International Congress of Medieval Philosophy , Helsinki, 24-29 August 1987. [REVIEW]Reijo Työrinoja, Dagfinn Lehtinen Anja Inkeri, Følesdal & International Society for the Study of Medieval Philosophy - 1990
  38. added 2017-09-28
    Abstraction in Al-F'r'bî.Richard C. Taylor - 2006 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 80:151-168.
    Al-Fârâbî’s thought on intellect was known to the Latin West through the translation of his Letter on the Intellect, through the Long Commentary on the De Anima by Averroes and through some other works. Al-Fârâbî identified the active power of intellect in Aristotle’s De Anima 3.5 as the unique and separately existing Agent Intellect, but the role of the Agent Intellect in forming intelligibles in act in the human soul is by no means unequivocally clear. Further, the apprehension of intelligibles (...)
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  39. added 2017-09-27
    Theories of Cognition in the Later Middle Ages: A Journal of Analytic Scholasticism. [REVIEW]David Svoboda - 2006 - Studia Neoaristotelica 3 (2):183-190.
  40. added 2017-03-11
    Imagination, Intellect and Premotion A Psychological Theory of Domingo Báñez: A Journal of Analytic Scholasticism.David Peroutka Ocd - 2010 - Studia Neoaristotelica 7 (2):107-115.
    The notion of physical premotion is usually associated with the theological topic of divine concurrence. In the present paper I argue that the Thomist Domingo Báñez applied the concept of premotion also in his psychology. According to Báñez, the active intellect communicates a kind of “actual motion” to the phantasma in order to render it a collaborator of intellectual cognition. Such an actual motion is, in other words, a premotion to the effect, as the phantasma is, in Báñez’s view, “elevated” (...)
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  41. added 2017-03-10
    Aplicações da Psicologia Tomista à Psicologia Pastoral quanto ao governo das emoções.Lamartine de Hollanda Cavalcanti Neto - 2010 - Lumen Veritatis 3:90-110.
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  42. added 2017-03-10
    Metodologia tomista no estudoda Psicologia.Lamartine de Hollanda Cavalcanti Neto - 2008 - Lumen Veritatis 1:111-120.
  43. added 2017-03-08
    Thomas Aquinas and Knowledge of Material Objects: Proper Objects of Cognition.Catherine Jack Deavel - 2009 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 83:269-278.
    I will defend a principle at work in Thomas Aquinas’s argument that the human intellect must be immaterial in order to know material things in SummaTheologica, Ia, q.75, a.2. Thomas relies on the position that whatever knows certain things would be impeded in this knowledge if it contained in itself thesesame things. Thus, if humans can, in principle, know all material things, then the intellect cannot be material. The position that a material intellect would be limited in knowledge of material (...)
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  44. added 2017-03-08
    Aquinas on Mental Representation: Concepts and Intentionality.Jeffrey E. Brower - 2008 - Philosophical Review 117 (2):193-243.
    This essay explores some of the central aspects of Aquinas's account of mental representation, focusing in particular on his views about the intentionality of concepts. It begins by demonstrating the need for a new interpretation of his account, showing in particular that the standard interpretations all face insurmountable textual difficulties. It then develops the needed alternative and explains how it avoids the sorts of problems plaguing the standard interpretations. Finally, it draws out the implications of this interpretation with the aim (...)
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  45. added 2017-03-07
    Rôle de l’espèce et immédiateté dans la connaissance intellectuelle du singulier chez Matthieu d’Aquasparta.Ana Irimescu - 2009 - Chôra 7:175-210.
    The question of intellectual intuition in medieval philosophy is generally associated with names like John Duns Scotus and William Ockham whose majorcontributions to the development of the theory of intuition are well established. Nevertheless the way they approached this philosophical question is strongly related to the Franciscan tradition to which they both belonged so that an extensive comprehension of their theories of intuition requires the inquiry of their sources. As this paper means to show, Matthew of Aquasparta is one of (...)
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  46. added 2017-03-07
    Johannes Brachtendorf: Die Sturktur des menschlichen Geistes nach Augustinus.Klaus Kahnert - 2002 - Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 7:251-256.
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  47. added 2017-03-03
    Perspektivy logické sémantiky Jana Buridana: A Journal of Analytic Scholasticism.Miroslav Hanke - 2007 - Studia Neoaristotelica 4 (2):111-142.
    The subject of the present article is the analysis of fundamental logical-semantical terminology of late-medieval nominalistic logician Jean Buridan. The analysis focuses on the concepts of truth conditions and logical consequence, whose clarification presupposes explication of modal terminology as well as a solution of semantical antinomies such as “Liar”. The analysis of Buridan’s argumentation suggests that Buridan’s project of logic actually fails due to several failures of conceptual analysis of semantical and modal terminology. An alternative solution of the question concerning (...)
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  48. added 2017-03-02
    Elliptical Orbits and the Aristotelian Scientific Revolution Comment on Groarke.James Franklin - 2016 - Studia Neoaristotelica 13 (2):169-179.
    The Scientific Revolution was far from the anti-Aristotelian movement traditionally pictured. Its applied mathematics pursued by new means the Aristotelian ideal of science as knowledge by insight into necessary causes. Newton’s derivation of Kepler’s elliptical planetary orbits from the inverse square law of gravity is a central example.
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  49. added 2017-03-01
    Remarks on Thomas Aquinas’s Philosophy of Mind: Intentionality.Elena Băltuţă - 2009 - Chôra 7:315-332.
    Im Folgenden werde ich einige der möglichen Interpretationen der thomistischen Intentionalitätstheorie darstellen. Zuerst werde ich die Mechanismen der menschlichen Erkenntnis und der Beziehung zwischen phantasmata, species sensibile und species intelligibile bei Thomas von Aquin beschreiben. Danachwerde ich die verschiedenen Interpretationen des Problems der Intentionalität bei Thomas darstellen; genauer gesagt geht es um drei reduktive Interpretationenund eine nicht-reduktive. Am Ende dieses Beitrags werde ich mich für eine dieser Interpretationen entscheiden und meine Gründe dafür angeben.
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  50. added 2017-03-01
    Maria Michela Sassi , Tracce nella mente. Teorie della memoria da Platone ai moderni.Antonio Cimino - 2008 - Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 13 (1):269-271.
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