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  1. On the Concept of the Human Body in Heraclitus.Shawn Loht - forthcoming - Proceedings of the Southeast Philosophy Congress.
    Explores how the fragments of Heraclitus might yield an implicit understanding of the human body in distinction to the soul. In the history of scholarship on Heraclitus, soul is a much better understood concept, whereas it is normally assumed that Heraclitus, along with other figures of early Greek thought, shows only the most limited comprehension of the human being in terms of bodily form or substance. In this work I sketch some different ways in which Heraclitus’ accounts of nature and (...)
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  2. Heidegger and Heraclitus. Heidegger Heraclitus. The Inception of Occidental Thinking and Logic: Heraclitus's Doctrine of the Logos. Translated by Julia Goesser Assaiante and S. Montgomery Ewegen. Pp. XVIII + 309. London and New York: Bloomsbury Academic, 2018 . Paper, £19.99 . Isbn: 978-0-8264-6241-1. [REVIEW]Hans Ruin - forthcoming - The Classical Review:1-3.
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  3. Heraclitus Against the Naïve Paratactic Metaphysics of Mere Things.Keith Begley - 2021 - Ancient Philosophy Today 3 (1):74-97.
    This article considers an interpretative model for the study of Heraclitus, which was first put forward by Alexander Mourelatos in 1973, and draws upon a related model put forward by Julius Moravcsik beginning in 1983. I further develop this combined model and provide a motivation for an interpretation of Heraclitus. This is also of interest for modern metaphysics due to the recurrence of structurally similar problems, including the ‘colour exclusion’ problem that was faced by Wittgenstein. Further, I employ the model (...)
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  4. The Origins of Philosophy in Ancient Greece and Ancient India: A Historical Comparison by Richard Seaford.Monte Ransome Johnson - 2021 - Philosophy East and West 71 (2):1-10.
    In his adventurous monograph in comparative philosophy, The Origins of Philosophy in Ancient Greece and Ancient India, Richard Seaford offers to explain why philosophy, which on his account originated in the sixth century BCE separately in both Greece and India, took such a similar form in both cultures.
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  5. Hope in Ancient Greek Philosophy.G. Scott Gravlee - 2020 - In Historical and Multidisciplinary Perspectives on Hope. Cham: pp. 3-23.
    This chapter aims to illuminate ways in which hope was significant in the philosophy of classical Greece. Although ancient Greek philosophies contain few dedicated and systematic expositions on the nature of hope, they nevertheless include important remarks relating hope to the good life, to reason and deliberation, and to psychological phenomena such as memory, imagination, fear, motivation, and pleasure. After an introductory discussion of Hesiod and Heraclitus, the chapter focuses on Plato and Aristotle. Consideration is given both to Plato’s direct (...)
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  6. On the Ethical Dimension of Heraclitus' Thought.Mark Johnstone - 2020 - In David Wolfsdorf (ed.), Early Greek Ethics. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 37-53.
    This paper argues that Heraclitus was deeply and centrally interested in ethical questions, understood broadly as questions about how human beings should live. In particular, I argue, Heraclitus held that wisdom is essential for living well, and that most people lack the kind of fundamental insight into the nature of reality in which wisdom consists. Topics covered include Heraclitus’ views on: the good and bad condition of the soul, the nature and sources of wisdom, the reasons why most people remain (...)
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  7. Das Potências da Memória. A Afirmação da Transitoriedade Histórica E da Eternidade Das Ideias.Augusto B. De Carvalho Dias Leite - 2020 - Kriterion: Journal of Philosophy 61 (145):107-129.
    RESUMO A partir do exame da tradição heraclitiana e platônica sobre a transitoriedade e a imortalidade - conceitos compreendidos como universais - este artigo defende a seguinte antinomia como tese: para haver temporalidade é preciso haver eternidade. Essa tese é demonstrada por meio do estudo e atualização das noções de alma, espírito, ideia e memória, as quais estão conectadas invariavelmente ao tempo passado como princípio ontológico do fenômeno histórico. Para além do ponto de vista filosófico, portanto, da perspectiva específica do (...)
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  8. The Sleep of Reason: Sleep and the Philosophical Soul in Ancient Greece.Victoria Wohl - 2020 - Classical Antiquity 39 (1):126-151.
    Freud tracked the psyche along the paths of sleep, following the “royal road” of dreams. For the ancient Greeks, too, the psyche was revealed in sleep, not through the semiotics of dreams but through the peculiar state of being we occupy while asleep. As a “borderland between living and not living”, sleep offered unique access to the psukhē, that element within the self unassimilable to waking consciousness. This paper examines how Greek philosophers theorized the sleep state and the somnolent psukhē, (...)
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  9. The Fires of Change: Kirk, Popper, and the Heraclitean Debate.Holly Cooper - 2019 - Stance 12 (1):57-63.
    In this paper, I explore a prominent question of Hericlitean scholarship: how is change possible? Karl Popper and G. S. Kirk tackle this same question. Kirk asserts that Heraclitus believed that change is present on a macrocosmic level and that all change is regulated by the cosmic principle logos. Popper, on the other hand, claims Heraclitus believed that change is microcosmic and rejected that all change is regulated by logos. I argue for a combination of aspects from each of their (...)
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  10. The Other as the Essence of Existence: A Journal of a Philosophical Passage to Altruism.Iraklis Ioannidis - 2019 - Dissertation, University of Glasgow
    This research is about altruism. In our first chapter, our quest to find whether we are essentially altruistic starts with questioning particular ways of inquiry and proposes a philosophy of unbracketing. In our second chapter, we realise that our proposal starts with an imperative – a prescription. We begin by meditating on the phenomenon of prescription which seems to precede all ways of inquiry. Our analysis of prescription reveals that altruism is to prescribe oneself towards an Other. This type of (...)
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  11. Phusis, Opposites and Ontological Dependence in Heraclitus.Richard Neels - 2018 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 35 (3):199-217.
    The earliest recorded philosophical use of the term "phusis" occurs in the fragments of Heraclitus (most notably at B1 and B123). Phusis, in the non-philosophical writings relevant to Heraclitus’s time (e.g. from Homer to Aeschylus and Pindar), was generally used to characterize the external physical appearance of something. Heraclitus, on the other hand, seems to have used the term in the completely opposite manner: an object’s phusis is hidden (kruptesthai) and greater (kreissōn) than the external appearance (B123 and B54). Despite (...)
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  12. Elements and Opposites in Heraclitus.Richard Neels - 2018 - Apeiron 51 (4):427-452.
    Journal Name: Apeiron Issue: Ahead of print.
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  13. Paradoxical Utterances. An Approximation About Nishida’s Use of Heraclitus’ Fragments in An Inquiry Into the Good (1911).Montserrat Crespin Perales - 2018 - Proceedings of the XXIII World Congress of Philosophy.
    Paradoxical Utterances. An Approximation about Nishida’s Use of Heraclitus’ Fragments in An Inquiry into the Good (1911) -/- The paper discusses the use of Heraclitus’ ideas in Nishida Kitarõ early work, An inquiry into the Good (1911), in order to show how both thinkers, distant in time and philosophical tradition, coincide in present the formative process of reality, defending a common principle that impulses the process (named logos and “pure experience”). It also discusses how these principles can be feasible strategies (...)
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  14. Heraclitus’ Political Thought.Jan Maximilian Robitzsch - 2018 - Apeiron 51 (4):405-426.
    Journal Name: Apeiron Issue: Ahead of print.
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  15. Ipotesi sul concetto di contraddizione in Eraclito.Marta de Grandi - 2017 - Comunicazione Filosofica:154-161.
    Heraclitus is the first philosopher, and one of the few ones, who is aware of original contradiction. His thought still presents some ambiguities mostly due to the still intuitive discovery of the relation between language, contradiction and logos. Heraclitus saw the contradiction. He does not care about how the fact of communication is possible, as it indeed is, but rather he endeavours to put into question its problematic essence. -/- .
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  16. Heraclitus, Milesian Monism, and the Felting of Wool.Robert Hahn - 2017 - In Enrica Fantino, Ulrike Muss, Charlotte Schubert, Kurt Sier & Ulricke Muss Enrica Fantino (eds.), Heraklit Im Kontext. De Gruyter. pp. 187-210.
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  17. Heraclitus on Pythagoras.Leonid Zhmud - 2017 - In Charlotte Schubert, Ulrike Muss, Kurt Sier & Enrica Fantino (eds.), Heraklit Im Kontext. De Gruyter. pp. 171-186.
  18. Heidegger on Heraclitus.Richard Capobianco - 2016 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 20 (2):465-476.
    This essay draws on texts previously untranslated into English, and in particular Heidegger’s brilliant 1943 lecture course on Heraclitus, to show how Heidegger understood kosmos as an early Greek name for Being itself. The contemporary scholarship has altogether missed the significant role that this Greek Ur-word plays in his later thinking. The “gleaming,” “adorning” kosmos—which the later Heidegger understood to be “world” in the fullest and richest sense—is not in the first place any kind of transcendental-phenomenological “projection” of the human (...)
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  19. Heraclitean Critique of Kantian and Enlightenment Ethics Through the Fijian Ethos.Erman Kaplama - 2016 - Cosmos and History 12 (1):143-165.
    Kant makes a much-unexpected confession in a much-unexpected place. In the Criticism of the third paralogism of transcendental psychology of the first Critique Kant accepts the irrefutability of the Heraclitean notion of universal becoming or the transitory nature of all things, admitting the impossibility of positing a totally persistent and self-conscious subject. The major Heraclitean doctrine of panta rhei makes it impossible to conduct philosophical inquiry by assuming a self-conscious subject or “I,” which would potentially be in constant motion like (...)
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  20. Heraclitus Fragment B123 DK.Glenn W. Most - 2016 - In Susan Neiman, Peter Galison & Wendy Doniger (eds.), What Reason Promises: Essays on Reason, Nature and History. De Gruyter. pp. 117-123.
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  21. Towards a Genealogy of the Metaphysics of Sight: Seeing, Hearing, and Thinking in Heraclitus and Parmenides.Jussi Backman - 2015 - In Antonio Cimino & Pavlos Kontos (eds.), Phenomenology and the Metaphysics of Sight. Brill. pp. 11-34.
    The paper outlines a tentative genealogy of the Platonic metaphysics of sight by thematizing pre-Platonic thought, particularly Heraclitus and Parmenides. By “metaphysics of sight” it understands the features of Platonic-Aristotelian metaphysics expressed with the help of visual metaphors. It is argued that the Platonic metaphysics of sight can be regarded as the result of a synthesis of the Heraclitean and Parmenidean approaches. In pre-Platonic thought, the visual paradigm is still marginal. For Heraclitus, the basic structure of being is its discursive (...)
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  22. Heraclitus, the Becoming and the Platonic-Aristotelian Doxography.Francesco Fronterotta - 2015 - Archai: Revista de Estudos Sobre as Origens Do Pensamento Ocidental 15:117-128.
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  23. Heraclitus, the Becoming and the Platonic-Aristotelian Doxography.Francesco Fronterotta - 2015 - Archai: Revista de Estudos Sobre as Origens Do Pensamento Ocidental 15:117-128.
    The purpose of this paper is to examine heraclitean fragments evoking the metaphor of rivers and waters flowing, usually associated by tradition to the image of reality in becoming and the conception of nature as a more or less disordered streaming. These fragments are certainly among the most celebrated and lucky fragments of the philosopher of Ephesus, which can be explained by the fact that they have been used since Plato and Aristotle, to represent in an exemplary way the philosophical (...)
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  24. Community in Fragments: Reading Relation in the Fragments of Heraclitus.Carrie Giunta - 2015 - In Douglas Brommesson & Henrik Enroth (eds.), Global Communities: Transnational and Transdisciplinary Exchanges. Rowman & Littlefield.
  25. Das ökonomische Verfahren und die Zukunft.Sergiusz Kazmierski - 2015 - In Ivo De Gennaro, Sergiusz Kazmierski & Ralf Lüfter (eds.), Ökonomie und Zukunft. Bozen: pp. 117-122.
    Der Kurzbeitrag behandelt das Problem des quellen- und zukunftsorientierten Fragens im Zusammenhang der heutigen ökonomischen Professionalisierung. Dabei untersucht er im Ausgang vom Begriff der Geltung den einheitlichen, ontologischen Grundzug heutiger ökonomischer Verfahrensweisen. Es wird deutlich, dass dem gegenwärtigen gültigen Ökonomisieren die Leugnung der Faktizität von Sein und Zeit zugrundeliegt, womit eine Seins- und Zukunftslosigkeit einhergeht, in der sich jede zukunftsoffene Fragebahn wiederfindet.
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  26. Parmenides: Paraphrasing Heraclitus in Verse.Michael M. Nikoletseas - 2015
    An analysis of the poem of Parmenides from a natural science perspective shows that it is based on Heraclitus' book. Imagery, philosophy, and even words were borrowed from Heraclitus. The new picture that emerges warrants the conclusion that Parmenides paraphrased Heraclitus in verse.
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  27. Heraclitus, Plato, and the Philosophic Dogs.Enrique Hülsz Piccone - 2015 - Archai: Revista de Estudos Sobre as Origens Do Pensamento Ocidental 15:105-115.
    The paper focuses on a neglected instance of the Platonic reception of Heraclitus in the Republic, trying to show that it’s likely that Plato’s passage makes an allusion to Heraclitus’ B97 and B85. The main claim is that Plato’s use of the image of dogs looks back to Heraclitus, which invites an exploration of the possibility that at least some elements of Plato’s kallipolis might derive from Heraclitus – particularly from some ethical and political fragments. A brief survey of these (...)
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  28. Olearius on Atomism and Theism in Heraclitus: A Presocratic in Late 17th Century Germany.Oliver Primavesi - 2015 - Rhizomata 3 (1).
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  29. How Musical Was Heraclitus’ Harmony? A Reassessment of 22 B 8, 10, 51 DK.Maria Michela Sassi - 2015 - Rhizomata 3 (1).
    This essay provides a comprehensive and detailed analysis of a cluster of Heraclitus’ fragments that revolve around an image of ‘musical’ harmony (B 8, 10, and 51 Diels-Kranz). The aim is to demonstrate that more numerous as well as more specific references to contemporary musical practice can be found in these fragments than is usually thought. In particular, it is argued that in his talk of cosmic harmonia Heraclitus might well know and exploit a musical sense of this word, namely, (...)
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  30. Heraclitus’ Fragment B 52 DK Re-Examined.Sandra Šćepanović - 2015 - Rhizomata 3 (1).
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  31. On 'Logos' in Heraclitus.Mark A. Johnstone - 2014 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 47:1-29.
    In this paper, I offer a new solution to the old problem of how best to understand the meaning of the word ‘logos’ in the extant writings of Heraclitus, especially in fragments DK B1, B2 and B50. On the view I defend, Heraclitus was neither using the word in a perfectly ordinary way in these fragments, as some have maintained, nor denoting by it some kind of general principle or law governing change in the cosmos, as many have claimed. Rather, (...)
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  32. The Syntax of Life: Gregory Bateson and the “Platonic View”.Claudia Baracchi - 2013 - Research in Phenomenology 43 (2):204-219.
    The essay follows the fil rouge of ancient Greek thinking in the work of Gregory Bateson, an unusually multi-faceted and energetically nomadic intellect in the landscape of twentieth-century hyper-specialized disciplines, whose eclectic research focused on the question of life and of human participation in a living world. Through the reverberation of Neoplatonic motifs and echoing pre-Socratic intuitions, Bateson reflects on the “pattern which connects”—the λόγος that says one and all things, and the interpenetration of one and all things, thus operating (...)
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  33. Cosmological Aesthetics Through the Kantian Sublime and Nietzschean Dionysian.Erman Kaplama - 2013 - UPA, Rowman & Littlefield.
    This book is founded on a close reading of Kant’s Opus Postumum in order both to explore the essential motivation that drove Kant to write a last comprehensive magnum opus and, by doing so, to show the essential link between his aesthetics and the idea of Übergang, the title of this last work. For this work contains not only his dynamical theory of matter defining motion as preliminary to the notions of space and time, and the advanced version of his (...)
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  34. Unhinged: Kairos and the Invention of the Untimely.Robert Leston - 2013 - Atlantic Journal of Communication 21 (1):29-50.
    Traditionally, kairos has been seen as a “timely” concept, and so invention is said to emerge fromthe timeliness of a cultural and historical situation. But what if invention was thought of as thepotential to shift historical courses through the injection of something new or alien into a situation?This essay argues that kairos has not been able to free itself from its historical constraints becauseit has been bound to a human sense of temporality. By evolving along patterns different from print,the apparatus (...)
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  35. Heraclitus on Religion.Glenn Most - 2013 - Rhizomata 1 (2):153-167.
    The article sets out to reinterpret Heraclitus' views on religion and, by implication, his position in the context of the Presocratic philosophers' relationship to the Greek cultural tradition. It does so by examining the fragments in which Heraclitus' attitude to the popular religion of his time is reflected. The analysis of the fragments 69, 68, 15, 14, 5, 96, 93 and 92 DK reveals that the target of Heraclitus' criticism is not the religious practices themselves, but their popular interpretation. Heraclitus' (...)
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  36. Editing Heraclitus (1999-2012).Serge Mouraviev - 2013 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 17 (2):195-218.
    I shall tell you the story, propose an overview, and show the structure, goal, and peculiarities of this monstrous edition that I undertook forty-four years ago: the Heraclitea, of which ten volumes have appeared since 1999. One volume was published in November 2011 and a few others are still in preparation. While telling you this story, I shall strive to show the radical differences between my approaches and the standard ones taught worldwide in the departments of classics and ancient philosophy (...)
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  37. Heraclitus on Фύσις.Enrique Hülsz Piccone - 2013 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 17 (2):179-194.
    Presocratic philosophy as a historical category was defined by Aristotle as physics, or physical philosophy, because φύσις was its object of study, its practitioners being since tagged accordingly as φυσικοί or φυσιόλογοι. The central part of the paper deals briefly with the four pioneering Heraclitean uses of the word φύσις, in which the sense of the only Homeric use of the term seems to be deepened and continued. Φύσις in Heraclitus has an ontological sense, and appears always in epistemic contexts, (...)
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  38. The Logos Paradox: Heraclitus, Material Language, and Rhetoric.Robin Reames - 2013 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 46 (3):328-350.
    In her 1996 and 2006 essays “Being and Becoming: Rhetorical Ontology in Early Greek Thought” and “The Task of the Bow: Heraclitus’ Rhetorical Critique of Epic Language,” Carol Poster was the first to argue for the historical and theoretical relevance of Heraclitus in the discipline of rhetoric. Despite the admonitions of Edward Schiappa (1999) and Thomas Cole (1991) against applying rhetorical theories that only emerged after the fourth century BCE to pre- or proto-rhetorical texts, Poster argues that Heraclitus merits the (...)
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  39. Heraclitus' Bow Composition.Celso Vieira - 2013 - Classical Quarterly 63 (2):473-490.
    This article aims to throw light on a recurrent structural feature of Heraclitus' style that, it will be argued, serves as a tool to enrich interpretation of his fragments. Named after the bow image used by the philosopher in B51, the ‘bow composition’ will be presented as a narrative technique developed by Heraclitus to reveal his conception of the world. In B51 we read: οὐ ξυνιᾶσιν ὅκως διαϕερόμενον ἑωυτῶι ὁμολογέει· παλίντροπος ἁρμονίη ὅκωσπερ τόξου καὶ λύρης . Following an assumption that (...)
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  40. Heraclitus and Parmenides, Philosophers of Becoming and Being.Theodoros Christidis - 2012 - Philosophical Inquiry 36 (1-2):18-41.
  41. Francesco Ademollo, Plato's Cratylus: A Commentary. [REVIEW]Shawn Loht - 2012 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 50 (3):450-51.
  42. Heidegger’s Phenomenology of the Greek Gods.Shawn Loht - 2012 - Philosophy Today 56 (4):419-33.
    Develops Heidegger’s understanding of the Greek gods in the summer 1943 lecture course on Heraclitus. Of particular note is Heidegger’s assertion at the beginning of the lecture course that “there is no Greek religion,” though Heraclitus is said to “have” gods. Heidegger holds that the essential activity of gods consists in "giving signs." An explanation of the connection between gods and their signs gains clarification by a study of how Heidegger understands the Greek concepts of theoi and daimones in the (...)
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  43. O visível e o inteligível. Estudos sobre a percepção e o pensamento na Filosofia Grega Antiga.Miriam Campolina Diniz Peixoto, Marcelo Pimenta Marques, Fernando Rey Puente, M. C. D. Peixoto, M. P. Marques & F. R. Puente - 2012
    This book collects texts from three specialists in ancient philosophy which deal with the question of perceptive and intellective knowledge in antiquity. They try to present, in their different analyzes, the complex interrelationship among perception and thought in ancient authors, like Heraclitus, Parmenides, Democritus, Plato and Aristotle. The purpose of the texts is to expose the visible field - the perceptual knowledge domain - interacts with the invisible - the domain of reason and thought. In other words, that among them (...)
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  44. The Logos of Heraclitus: The First Philosopher of the West on its Most Interesting Term.Eva T. H. Brann - 2011 - Paul Dry Books.
    Eva Brann delves into Heraclitus's famously cryptic saying, "all things come to be in accordance with this Logos.".
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  45. Interpreting Heidegger: New Essays.Daniel O. Dahlstrom (ed.) - 2011 - Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: Notes on contributors; Introduction; Acknowledgements; Method of citation and bibliography of Heidegger's works; Part I. Interpreting Heidegger's Philosophy: 1. Heidegger's hermeneutics: towards a new practice of understanding Holger Zaborowski; 2. Facticity and Ereignis Thomas Sheehan; 3. The null basis-being of a nullity, or between two nothings - Heidegger's uncanniness Simon Critchley; 4. Freedom Charles Guignon; 5. Ontotheology Iain Thomson; Part II. Interpreting Heidegger's Interpretation: 6. Being at the beginning: Heidegger's interpretation of Heraclitus Daniel O. Dahlstrom; 7. (...)
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  46. L'Heraclite Physicien de Schleiermacher : Avec Une Note Sur l'Interpretation de Hegel.André Laks - 2011 - In Oliver Primavesi & Katharina Luchner (eds.), The Presocratics From the Latin Middle Ages to Hermann Diels. Steiner Verlag.
  47. Being Alive, Being Conscious, and Being: An Existential Reading of Heraclitus' Fragment 101.Shawn Loht - 2011 - Proceedings of the Southeast Philosophy Congress 4:116-26.
    Advocates an existential, phenomenological reading of Heraclitus suggested by Hans-Georg Gadamer. Gadamer observes that within the Heraclitean fragments lay a subliminal wonder at the contradiction and groundlessness of the human experience, particularly the unmediated experience of thinking. I take Gadamer to suggest in part that Heraclitus writes the fragments motivated by a sort of phenomenological disclosure, not necessarily of Being (pace Heidegger), but of the human experience as one of contradictory transitions and unrestricted movements between poles of opposition.
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  48. Les fleuves d'Héraclite: un couple d'aphorismes?Lucia Saudelli - 2011 - Elenchos 32 (1):79-94.
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  49. Parmênides e Heráclito: diferença e sintonia.Izabela Bocayuva - 2010 - Kriterion: Journal of Philosophy 51 (122):399-412.
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  50. Heraclitus, the Cosmos, and the God, Theodoros Christidis, Introduction: V. Kalfas. [REVIEW]Theodoros Christidis - 2010 - Philosophical Inquiry 32 (1-2):134-143.
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