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  1. The Last Natural Philosophers in Plato’s Phaedo 99b2-C6.Daniel Vázquez - forthcoming - Mnemosyne.
    This paper examines the possible sources of the theories introduced in Phaedo 99b2-c6. It argues that Plato is primarily alluding to Aristophanes’ Clouds and views held by Diogenes of Apollonia and Archelaus of Athens. But the passage, I also suggest, could serve another rhetorical function. By inviting us to reflect on whether and to what extent other natural philosophers fit the description of these theories, the text emphasises the gulf between Socrates and his predecessors. The paper concludes by discussing the (...)
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  2. A CAÇA À SABEDORIA: a sophia a partir da Apologia de Platão.Carlos Augusto de Oliveira Carvalhar - 2020 - Dissertation, UFRJ, Brazil
    This is a study of sophía from the passage 20d-21a in Plato’s Apology. There, Socrates tries to understand what kind of wisdom he would have, since the Oracle of Delphi stated that no one would be wiser than him. An investigation of historical aspects was made to understand the trial of Socrates and conviction, also a mapping of sophía’s main uses through the corpus platonicum was built, as well an overview of the usage of this concept by others greek authors. (...)
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  3. Readings of Plato’s Apology of Socrates: Defending The Philosophical Life. Edited by Vivil Valvik Haralden, Olof Pettersson, and Oda E. Wiese Tvedt. [REVIEW]Gene Fendt - 2019 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 93 (1):177-178.
  4. What Rules and Laws Does Socrates Obey.David Lévystone - 2019 - Tópicos: Revista de Filosofía 57:57-75.
    Socrates ́ thought of justice and obedience to laws is moti- vated by a will to avoid the destructive effects of Sophistic criti- cisms and theories of laws. He thus requires–against theories of natural law–an almost absolute obedience to the law, as far as this law respects the legal system of the city. But, against legal positivism, Socrates would not admit that a law is just simply because it is a law: he is looking for the true Just. However, as (...)
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  5. Plato's Apology Between Philosophy and Rhetoric - Haraldsen, Pettersson, Wiese Tvedt Readings of Plato's Apology of Socrates. Defending the Philosophical Life. Pp. VIII + 248. Lanham, Boulder, New York and London: Lexington Books, 2018. Cased, £70, Us$100. Isbn: 978-1-4985-4999-8. [REVIEW]Thanassis Samaras - 2019 - The Classical Review 69 (1):51-53.
  6. Readings of Plato's Apology of Socrates: Defending the Philosophical Life.Vivil Valvik Haraldsen, Olof Pettersson & Oda E. Wiese Tvedt (eds.) - 2017 - Lexington.
    Contributors to this volume focus on the character of Socrates as the embodiment of philosophy, employing this as a starting point for exploring various themes exposed in the Apology. These include the relation of philosophy to democracy, rhetoric, politics, or society in general, and the overarching question of what comprises the philosophic life.
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  7. The Apology and Other Dialogues.Andrew Bailey (ed.) - 2016 - Broadview Press.
    Socrates, one of the first of the great philosophers, left no written works. What survives of his thought are second-hand descriptions of his teachings and conversations—including, most famously, the accounts of his trial and execution composed by his friend, student, and philosophical successor, Plato. In _Euthyphro_, Socrates examines the concept of piety and displays his propensity for questioning Athenian authorities. Such audacity is not without consequence, and in the _Apology_ we find Socrates defending himself in court against charges of impiety (...)
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  8. The Value of Rule in Plato’s Dialogues: A Reply to Melissa Lane.David Ebrey - 2016 - Plato Journal 16:75-80.
    A reply to Melissa Lane's "Antianarchia: interpreting political thought in Plato" In these comments I focus on how to think of antianarchia as an element of Plato's political thought, and in doing so raise some methodological questions about how to read Plato’s dialogues, focusing on what is involved in attributing views to Plato in general.
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  9. Thomas Aquinas – Human Dignity and Conscience as a Basis for Restricting Legal Obligations.Marek Piechowiak - 2016 - Diametros 47:64-83.
    In contemporary positive law there are legal institutions, such as conscientious objection in the context of military service or “conscience clauses” in medical law, which for the sake of respect for judgments of conscience aim at restricting legal obligations. Such restrictions are postulated to protect human freedom in general. On the basis of Thomas Aquinas’ philosophy, it shall be argued that human dignity, understood as the existential perfection of a human being based on special unity, provides a foundation for imposing (...)
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  10. Plato’s Apology as Forensic Oratory.John Roger Tennant - 2015 - Archai: Revista de Estudos Sobre as Origens Do Pensamento Ocidental 14:39-50.
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  11. Socrates and the Gods [Review]. [REVIEW]Geoffrey Bagwell - 2014 - Ancient Philosophy 34 (1):204-207.
  12. Socrates and the Gods: How to Read Plato's Euthyphro, Apology and Crito. By Nalin Ranasinghe. [REVIEW]Gene Fendt - 2014 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 88 (1):187-189.
  13. Introduction to "Sophistae".Rafael Ferber - 2014 - In Fulvia de Luise & Alessandro Stavru (eds.), Socratica III. Academia Verlag. pp. 201-203.
    Plato’s “Apology of Socrates” is a masterpiece of the philosophical literature. The question remains as to how much it has been influenced by earlier works, e.g. of Gorgias of Leontinoi and Euripides. Nevertheless, comparative studies on Hippolytus’ defense in Euripides’ tragedy of the same name, on Gorgias’ “Defense of Palamedes” and on Plato’s “Apology” do not exist. The short paper gives an introduction into the status quaestionis.
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  14. Why Socrates Does Not Request Exile in the Apology.Thomas F. Morris - 2014 - Heythrop Journal 55 (1):73-85.
  15. Plato's Apology of Socrates, A Metaphilosophical Text.John Sellars - 2014 - Philosophy and Literature 38 (2):433-45.
    Plato’s Apology is not merely an account of Socrates’ trial, it is also a work of metaphilosophy, presenting Socrates’ understanding of the nature and function of philosophy. This is a vital part of the text’s apologetic task, for it is only with reference to Socrates’ understanding of what philosophy is that we can understand, and so justify, his seemingly antisocial behaviour. Plato presents to us Socrates’ metaphilosophy in two ways: via what Socrates says and what he does. This twofold method (...)
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  16. Rethinking Plato: A Cartesian Quest for the Real Plato.Necip Fikri Alican - 2012 - New York: Brill | Rodopi.
    This book is a quest for the real Plato, forever hiding behind the veil of drama. The quest, as the subtitle indicates, is Cartesian in that it looks for Plato independently of the prevailing paradigms on where we are supposed to find him. The result of the quest is a complete pedagogical platform on Plato. This does not mean that the book leaves nothing out, covering all the dialogues and all the themes, but that it provides the full intellectual apparatus (...)
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  17. The Delphic Oracle on Socrates' Wisdom: A Myth?Louis-André Dorion - 2012 - In Catherine Collobert, Pierre Destrée & Francisco J. Gonzalez (eds.), Plato and Myth: Studies on the Use and Status of Platonic Myths. Brill.
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  18. The Ironic Defense of Socrates: Plato’s Apology, David Leibowitz, Cambridge University Press, 2010. [REVIEW]Mehmet Karabela - 2012 - Political Studies Review 10 (3):401-402.
  19. The Limits of Apology in a Democratic Criminal Justice: Some Remarks on Bennett's" The Apology Ritual".José Luis Martí - 2012 - Teorema: International Journal of Philosophy 31 (2):119-129.
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  20. The Ironic Defense of Socrates. Plato’s Apology. By David Leibowitz. [REVIEW]Paul Allen Miller - 2012 - Ancient Philosophy 32 (2):415-419.
  21. The Way in Which Socrates is Religious: The Epilogue of the First Speech of the Apology.Thomas F. Morris - 2011 - Heythrop Journal 52 (1):2-13.
  22. Reexamining Socrates in the Apology. Edited by Patricia Fagan and John Russon.Robin Waterfield - 2011 - Heythrop Journal 52 (1):115-116.
  23. The Anatomy of Three Thought Experiments in Plato’s Republic, Apology, and Alcibiades Minor.Andre M. Archie - 2010 - Journal of Philosophical Research 35:305-321.
    I argue that Plato’s use of thought experiments anticipate many of the themes discussed by Thomas S. Kuhn’s classic essay, “A Function for Thought Experiments.” Kuhn’s concern is that thought experiments satisfy the condition of verisimilitude. That is, thought experiments must not be conducted merely to alter the conceptual apparatus of the scientist regarding the phenomenon explored, but rather to alter the scientist’s conceptual apparatus for the sake of altering his actions (i.e., practical rationality). Plato, too, is quite concerned with (...)
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  24. Prudence and the Fear of Death in Plato’s Apology.Emily A. Austin - 2010 - Ancient Philosophy 30 (1):39-55.
  25. From the Religious to the Political Apology: How the Religious Prehistory of Apology Makes Sense of Collective Responsibility.Danielle Celermajer - 2010 - In Christopher Allers & Marieke Smit (eds.), Forgiveness in Perspective. Rodopi Press. pp. 66--117.
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  26. Does Lucius Really Fail to Learn From Socrates' Fate?Judith Hindermann - 2010 - Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 104 (1):77-88.
  27. “ S Knows That P ” Expanded: Apology 20 D–24 B.Elizabeth Tropman & Patrick McKee - 2010 - Social Epistemology 24 (1):29-43.
    There are calls to expand the schema “ S knows that p ” to accommodate ways of knowing that are socially important but neglected in recent epistemology. A wider, more adequate conception of human knowing is needed that will include interested or motivated inquirers as “S,” and personal traits of persons as “ p .” Historically important treatments of knowing that accommodate these features deserve examination as part of the effort to create a broader epistemology. We find such a treatment (...)
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  28. Traditional Forms of Wisdom and Politics in Plato's Apology.Harvey Goldman - 2009 - Classical Quarterly 59 (2):444-.
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  29. “There is Good Hope That Death is a Blessing”.J. F. Humphrey - 2009 - In Dennis Cooley & Lloyd Steffen (eds.), Innovative Dialogue. Probing the Boundaries: Re-Imagining Death and Dying. Interdisciplinary Press.
    In Plato’s Apology (29a-b), Socrates agues that he does not fear death; indeed, to fear death is a sign of ignorance. It is to claim to know what one in fact does not know (Ap. 29 a-b). Perhaps, Socrates suggests, death is not a great evil after all, but “the greatest of all goods.” At the end of the dialogue, after the judges have voted on the final verdict and Socrates has received the death penalty, the philosopher considers two common (...)
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  30. Plato on the Rhetoric of Philosophers and Sophists (Review).Richard D. Parry - 2009 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 47 (1):pp. 131-132.
    Marina McCoy defends three interrelated claims about the topic mentioned in her title. First, the distinction between philosophy and rhetoric in the dialogues is not as clear as some commentators seem to think. Second, since philosophy as practiced by Socrates includes important rhetorical dimensions, there is no important methodological distinction between philosophy and rhetoric. Third, it is his virtues—and not any particular method—that differentiate Socrates the philosopher from sophists and rhetoricians. McCoy pursues different aspects of her theses through the Apology, (...)
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  31. Socrates.George Rudebusch - 2009 - Oxford, UK: Wiley-Blackwell.
    _Socrates_ presents a compelling case for some life-changing conclusions that follow from a close reading of Socrates' arguments. Offers a highly original study of Socrates and his thought, accessible to contemporary readers Argues that through studying Socrates we can learn practical wisdom to apply to our lives Lovingly crafted with humour, thought-experiments and literary references, and with close reading sof key Socratic arguments Aids readers with diagrams to make clear complex arguments.
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  32. The Relation Between Politics and Philosophy in Plato’s Apology of Socrates.Lee Ward - 2009 - International Philosophical Quarterly 49 (4):501-519.
    In Plato’s Apology of Socrates, Socrates claims that any just person who becomes involved in politics will be destroyed by the “multitude” and that the philosopher must therefore lead a private life. I argue that Socrates’ elaboration of his relation to the political community, especially in the trial of the generals of Arginusae and the arrest of Leon, raises more questions than a cursory reading can answer both with respect to the logical structure of the argument in the Apology and (...)
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  33. Wisdom, Moderation, and Elenchus in Plato's Apology.Christopher S. King - 2008 - Metaphilosophy 39 (3):345–362.
    This article contends that Socratic wisdom (sophia) in Plato's Apology should be understood in relation to moderation (sophrosune), not knowledge (episteme). This stance is exemplified in an interpretation of Socrates' disavowal of knowledge. The god calls Socrates wise. Socrates holds both that he is wise in nothing great or small and that the god does not lie. These apparently inconsistent claims are resolved in an interpretation of elenchus. This interpretion says that Socrates is wise insofar as he does not believe (...)
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  34. The Pleasures of the Comic and of Socratic Inquiry.Mitchell Miller - 2008 - Arethusa 41 (2):263-289.
    At Apology 33c Socrates explains that "some people enjoy … my company" because "they … enjoy hearing those questioned who think they are wise but are not." At Philebus 48a-50b he makes central to his account of the pleasure of laughing at comedy the exposé of the self-ignorance of those who presume themselves wise. Does the latter passage explain the pleasure of watching Socrates at work? I explore this by tracing the admixture of pain, the causes, and the "natural harmony" (...)
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  35. Plato on Homeric Justice in Apology and Crito.Edward J. Grippe - 2007 - Philosophy in the Contemporary World 14 (2):11-29.
    This essay relates Plato’s views on Homeric justice in the Apology and Crito to current domestic and foreign policy. Applying the insights of these dialogues to contemporary issues of war and civil liberties, the essay contends that the separation of time and the foreignness of culture may aid our decisionmaking if we take the time to consider the lessons offered to us across the centuries. Plato assists in this bridging process through the literary device of the dialogue. The dialogues provide (...)
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  36. BRICKHOUSE, T.C. And SMITH, N.D. -Routledge Philosophy Guidebook to Plato and the Trial of Socrates.Shaun Baker - 2006 - Philosophical Books 47 (2):157-160.
  37. Routledge Philosophy Guidebook to Plato and the Trial of Socrates. [REVIEW]Emily Catherine Katz - 2006 - Ancient Philosophy 26 (1):183-188.
  38. Socrates and the Divine Signal According to Plato's Testimony: Philosophical Practice as Rooted in Religious Tradition.Luc Brisson - 2005 - Apeiron 38 (2):1 - 12.
  39. On the Source of Burnet's Construal of Apology 30b 2–4: A Correction.M. F. Burnyeat - 2005 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 125:139-142.
  40. Routledge Philosophy Guidebook to Plato and the Trial of Socrates.George Rudebusch - 2005 - Mind 114 (455):714-718.
  41. Routledge Philosophy Guidebook to Plato and the Trial of Socrates.Thomas C. Brickhouse & Nicholas D. Smith - 2004 - Routledge.
    Plato is the most important philosopher in the history of Western philosophy. This guidebook introduces and examines his three dialogues that deal with the death of Socrates: Euthphryo , Apology and Crito . These dialogues are widely regarded as the closest exposition of Socrates' ideas. Plato and the Trial of Socrates introduces and assesses: * Plato's life and the background to the three dialogues * The ideas and text in the three dialogues * Plato's continuing importance to philosophy Plato and (...)
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  42. Costantino Battini and the'Apology of the Barbaric Centuries'.E. Garin - 2004 - Rinascimento 44:1-14.
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  43. Platon Und Das Sokratische Pragma.Martin F. Meyer - 2004 - Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 9 (1):1-21.
    What made Socrates so special that he became the object of mockery, slander and hate? The answer in the Apology is expressed in the formula of the ‘Socratic pragma’. Plato claims that Socrates’ philosophical enterprise was a reaction to the Delphic oracle according to which no living Greek was wiser than Socrates. But does this really explain what it pretends to explain? The paper argues that this explanation tells us more about Plato’s philosophical approach than about this alleged turning point (...)
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  44. Apology 30B 2-4: Socrates, Money, and the Grammar of ΓΙΓΝΕΣΘΑΙApology 30B 2-4: Socrates, Money, and the Grammar of GIGNESQAI. [REVIEW]M. F. Burnyeat - 2003 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 123:1-25.
    The framework of this paper is a defence of Burnet's construal ofApology30b 2-4. Socrates does not claim, as he is standardly translated, that virtue makes you rich, but that virtue makes money and everything else good for you. This view of the relation between virtue and wealth is paralleled in dialogues of every period, and a sophisticated development of it appears in Aristotle. My philological defence of the philosophically preferable translation extends recent scholarly work on εἶναι in Plato and Aristotle (...)
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  45. Apology 30b 2-4: Socrates, Money, and the Grammar of "Gígnesthai".M. F. Burnyeat - 2003 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 123:1-25.
    The framework of this paper is a defence of Burnet's construal of Apology 30b 2-4. Socrates does not claim, as he is standardly translated, that virtue makes you rich, but that virtue makes money and everything el se good for you. This view of the relation between virtue and wealth is paralleled in dialogues of every period, and a sophisticated development of it appears in Aristotle. My philological defence of the philosophically preferable translation extends recent scholarly work on eínai in (...)
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  46. Socrates on Persuasion, Truth, and Courtroom Argumentation in Plato’s Apology.Dale Jacquette - 2003 - Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines 22 (4):33-41.
  47. Plato's Apology.James Barrett - 2001 - Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 95 (1).
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  48. An Apology.Philip Grier - 2001 - The Owl of Minerva 32 (2):177-177.
    The Fall 2000 issue of The Owl of Minerva published the papers presented to a Hegel Society of America session at the 1998 World Congress of Philosophy held in Boston. In the “Special Editor’s Introduction” to this issue, I inadvertently failed to give credit where credit was richly due. The topic for the session in question was proposed to the Executive Committee of the Hegel Society of America by Dr. Riccardo Pozzo of the Catholic University of America, and was selected (...)
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  49. The Historicity of Plato's Apology.W. Prior - 2001 - Polis 18 (1-2):41-57.
    Scholars who seek in Plato's early dialogues an accurate account of the philosophy of the historical Socrates place special weight on the Apology as a source of historical information about him. Even scholars like Charles Kahn, who generally reject this historicist approach to the early dialogues, accept the Apology as a ‘quasi-historical’ document. In this paper I attempt to raise doubts about the historical reliability of the Apology. I argue that the claims used to support the historicity of the Apology (...)
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  50. An Apology for Being a Historian of Philosophy.P. Rossi - 2001 - Rivista di Storia Della Filosofia 56 (2):293-305.
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