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  1. Sameness and Difference in the Piety of Thought.Will Britt - 2020 - Sophia 59 (2):285-309.
    The paper works out an account of the piety proper to philosophical thought. The investigation proceeds as a critical interpretation of three enigmatic claims made by Martin Heidegger about ‘the piety of thinking,’ but the paper is not simply exegetical; the interpretive work is constantly in service of an attempt to think through the phenomenon independently. Plato’s Euthyphro and Nietzsche’s critique of scientific piety both hover in the background of Heidegger’s pronouncements, and they are given special attention here. Through the (...)
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  2. Euthyphro and the Logic of Miasma.Maureen Eckert - 2019 - Logos and Episteme 10 (1):51-60.
    Euthyphro is a Socratic interlocutor claiming enormous religious expertise, while his portrayal in the eponymous dialogue raises questions the reliability of his beliefs. This paper closely examines how Euthyphro justifies his case against his father, identifying an argument that relies on the concept of miasma. In so far as miasma is considered in isolation, Euthyphro has a good argument. Unfortunately, there is more than miasma at stake when considering why one could prosecute one’s own parent. Introducing the other relevant concepts, (...)
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  3. Philosophical Piety in Response to Euthyphro’s Hubris.Will Britt - 2018 - Ancient Philosophy 38 (2):265-287.
    Through a close reading of Plato’s Euthyphro, I reopen an old question: what would it look like to think piously? Although the dialogue itself is aporetic with regard to the definition of piety as such, I show that a specifically philosophical piety emerges: namely, the capacity to deal well with sameness and difference. A look at central features of the dialogues that provide the Euthyphro’s dramatic context confirms this claim.
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  4. Wykładnia kategorii Boga ukrytego na podstawie dialogu Mikołaja z Kuzy De deo abscondito.Dorota Brylla - 2018 - Diametros 55:91-111.
    The paper presents the theological and philosophical category of Deus absconditus and shows it in the perspective of Nicholas of Cusa’s ideas contained in his dialogue De Deo Abscondito. The hidden God is the totally transcendent God that is beyond creation both ontologically and logically. Deus absconditus is God that cannot be the object of rational cognition and positive knowledge, hence the only way to acquire any knowledge of him is the method of negative theology. Therefore, the hidden God is (...)
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  5. Thomas Aquinas and the Euthyphro Dilemma.Peter Karl Koritansky - 2018 - Heythrop Journal.
  6. Plato’s Minos and the Euthyphro.Alex Priou - 2018 - Polis 35 (1):145-163.
    At the start of Plato’s Minos an anonymous comrade argues that the variability of law according to time and place undermines the claim that it conveys moral truth. But by the end he has accepted Minos as the greatest of lawgivers because of his education by Zeus. How does he manage to slide so quickly from the moral laxity of conventionalism to the moral absolutism of divine revelation? Guided by this question, the author considers how the two divergent parts of (...)
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  7. Identity and Explanation in the Euthyphro.David Ebrey - 2017 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 52:77-111.
    According to many interpreters, Socrates in the Euthyphro thinks that an answer to ‘what is the holy?’ should pick out some feature that is prior to being holy. While this is a powerful way to think of answers to the ‘what is it?’ question, one that Aristotle develops, I argue that the Euthyphro provides an important alternative to this Aristotelian account. Instead, an answer to ‘what is the holy?’ should pick out precisely being holy, not some feature prior to it. (...)
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  8. On Two Socratic Questions.Alex Priou - 2017 - The St. John's Review 58:77-91.
    The most famous Socratic question—ti esti touto?—is often pre- ceded by a far less famous, but more fundamental question—esti touto ti? Though this question is posed in many dialogues with re- spect to myriad topics, in every instance it receives but one answer: it is something, namely something that is. The dialogue devoted to why this question always meets with an affirmative answer would appear to be the Parmenides, for there Parmenides throws into question whether the eidē are, only to (...)
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  9. Polytheism and the Euthyphro.Edward P. Butler - 2016 - Walking the Worlds: A Biannual Journal of Polytheism and Spiritwork 2 (2).
    In this reading of the Euthyphro, Socrates and Euthyphro are seen less in a primordial conflict between reason and devotion, than as sincere Hellenic polytheists engaged in an inquiry based upon a common intuition that, in addition to the irreducible agency of the Gods, there is also some irreducible intelligible content to holiness. This reading is supported by the fact that Euthyphro does not claim the authority of revelation for his decision to prosecute his father, but rather submits it to (...)
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  10. The Euthyphro Dilemma.Kenneth Walden - 2015 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 90 (3):612-639.
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  11. Socrates and the Gods [Review]. [REVIEW]Geoffrey Bagwell - 2014 - Ancient Philosophy 34 (1):204-207.
  12. Socrates and the Gods: How to Read Plato's Euthyphro, Apology and Crito. By Nalin Ranasinghe. [REVIEW]Gene Fendt - 2014 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 88 (1):187-189.
  13. Five Readings of Euthyphro.Gene Fendt - 2014 - Philosophy and Literature 38 (2):495-509.
    Euthyphro is frequently dissected for its philosophical dilemmas regarding god’s love’s relation to holiness, and whether justice is a part of the holy or the converse. But how can we understand it as a literary whole? This paper exhibits five ways in which it can be so understood: Euthyphro is the subjectivist patsy (both a literalist and divine command theorist) playing against Socrates’ natural law-like moral objectivity; the dialogue is elenchic because the dilemmas are true; the dialogue is elenchic, but (...)
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  14. Questioning the Euthyphro-Question.Cass Weller - 2014 - Ancient Philosophy 34 (1):15-28.
  15. The Forms in the Euthyphro and the Statesman: A Case Against the Developmental Reading of Plato’s Dialogues.Michael Oliver Wiitala - 2014 - International Philosophical Quarterly 54 (4):393-410.
    The Euthyphro is generally considered one of Plato’s early dialogues. According to the developmental approach to reading the dialogues, when writing the Euthyphro Plato had not yet developed the sort of elaborate “theory of forms ” that we see presented in the middle dialogues and further refined in the late dialogues. This essay calls the developmental account into question by showing how key elements from the theory of forms that appear in the late dialogues, particularly in the Statesman, are already (...)
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  16. Love in the Euthyphro.Rui Zhu - 2014 - Apeiron 47 (1):1-15.
    Journal Name: Apeiron Issue: Ahead of print.
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  17. Formal Causes: Definition, Explanation, and Primacy in Socratic and Aristotelian Thought.Michael T. Ferejohn - 2013 - Oxford University Press.
    Michael T. Ferejohn presents a new analysis of Aristotle's theory of explanation and scientific knowledge, in the context of its Socratic roots. Ferejohn shows how Aristotle resolves the tension between his commitment to the formal-case model of explanation and his recognition of the role of efficient causes in explaining natural phenomena.
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  18. On Irony Interpretation: Socratic Method in Plato's Euthyphro.Dylan Brian Futter - 2013 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 21 (6):1030-1051.
    Socratic Method in the Euthyphro can be fruitfully analysed as a method of irony interpretation. Socrates' method – the irony of irony interpretation – is to pretend that Euthyphro is an ironist in order to transform him into a self-ironist. To be a self-ironist is to ironize one's knowledge of virtue in order to bring an intuitive and unarticulated awareness of virtue to mind. The exercise of the capacity for self-irony is then a mode of striving for the good.
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  19. The Euthyphro Dilemma.Christian Miller - 2013 - In Blackwell International Encyclopedia of Ethics. Blackwell. pp. 1-7.
    The Euthyphro Dilemma is named after a particular exchange between Socrates and Euthyphro in Plato‟s dialogue Euthyphro. In a famous passage, Socrates asks, “Is the pious loved by the gods because it is pious, or is it pious because it is loved by the gods?” (Plato 1981: 10a), and proceeds to advance arguments which clearly favor the first of these two options (see PLATO). The primary interest in the Euthyphro Dilemma over the years, however, has primarily concerned the relationship between (...)
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  20. Euthyphro’s Elenchus Experience: Ethical Expertise and Self-Knowledge. [REVIEW]Robert C. Reed - 2013 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 16 (2):245-259.
    The paper argues that everyday ethical expertise requires an openness to an experience of self-doubt very different from that involved in becoming expert in other skills—namely, an experience of profound vulnerability to the Other similar to that which Emmanuel Levinas has described. Since the experience bears a striking resemblance to that of undergoing cross-examination by Socrates as depicted in Plato’s early dialogues, I illustrate it through a close reading of the Euthyphro, arguing that Euthyphro’s vaunted “expertise” conceals a reluctance to (...)
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  21. Rethinking Plato: A Cartesian Quest for the Real Plato.Necip Fikri Alican - 2012 - New York: Brill | Rodopi.
    This book is a quest for the real Plato, forever hiding behind the veil of drama. The quest, as the subtitle indicates, is Cartesian in that it looks for Plato independently of the prevailing paradigms on where we are supposed to find him. The result of the quest is a complete pedagogical platform on Plato. This does not mean that the book leaves nothing out, covering all the dialogues and all the themes, but that it provides the full intellectual apparatus (...)
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  22. ¿Demuestra Sócrates la independencia de la moral en el Eutifrón?Pierre Baumann - 2012 - STOA 3 (6):31-41.
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  23. Parallel Trials: The Dramatic Structure of Plato's Euthyphro.Eli Diamond - 2012 - Classical Quarterly 62 (2):523-531.
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  24. Lessons From Euthyphro 10 A-11 B.Matthew Evans - 2012 - In Brad Inwood (ed.), Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
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  25. Myth and the Structure of Plato’s Euthyphro.Daniel Werner - 2012 - International Philosophical Quarterly 52 (1):41-62.
    Moving beyond the piecemeal approach to the Euthyphro that has dominated much of the previous secondary literature, I aim in this article to understand the dialogue as an integrated whole. I argue that the question of myth underlies the philosophical and dialogical progression of the Euthyphro. It is an adherence to traditional myth that motivates each of Euthyphro’s definitions and that also accounts for their failure. The dialogue thus presents a broad criticism of traditional myth. But, as Socrates’s references to (...)
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  26. Filial Piety in the Euthyphro.Doug Al-Maini - 2011 - Ancient Philosophy 31 (1):1-24.
  27. The Euthyphro Dilemma.David Baggett - 2011 - In Michael Bruce & Steven Barbone (eds.), Just the Arguments: 100 of the Most Important Arguments in Western Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell.
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  28. Euthyphro’s "Dilemma", Socrates’ Daimonion and Plato’s God.Timothy Chappell - 2010 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 2 (1):39 - 64.
    In this paper I start with the familiar accusation that divine command ethics faces a "Euthyphro dilemma". By looking at what Plato’s ’Euthyphro’ actually says, I argue that no such argument against divine-command ethics was Plato’s intention, and that, in any case, no such argument is cogent. I then explore the place of divine commands and inspiration in Plato’s thought more generally, arguing that Plato sees an important epistemic and practical role for both.
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  29. Carried Away in the Euthyphro.Lindsay Judson - 2010 - In David Charles (ed.), Definition in Greek Philosophy. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 31-61.
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  30. A New Euthyphro.Glenn Peoples - 2010 - Think 9 (25):65-83.
    It is my contention that what is generally construed as the Euthyphro Dilemma as a reason to deny that moral facts are based on theological facts is one of the worst arguments proposed in philosophy of religion or ethical theory, and that Socrates, the character of the dialogue who poses the dilemma, was both morally bankrupt in his challenge to Euthyphro, but more importantly here, ought to have lost the argument hands down. But in any dialogue, the author controls what (...)
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  31. On Philosophy's Progress: From Plato to Wittgenstein : R. Read.R. Read - 2010 - Philosophy 85 (3):341-367.
    I argue that the type of progress exhibited by philosophy is not that exhibited by science, but rather is akin to the kind of progress exhibited be someone becoming ‘older and wiser’. However, as actually-existing philosophy has gotten older, it has not always gotten wiser. As an illustration, I consider Rawls's conception of justification. I argue that Rawls's notion of what it is to have a philosophical justification exhibits no progress at all from Euthyphro's. In fact, drawing on a remark (...)
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  32. Review of John Holbo, Reason and Persuasion: Three Dialogues by Plato: Euthyphro, Meno, Republic Book I[REVIEW]Paul Carelli - 2009 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (12).
  33. Socrates.George Rudebusch - 2009 - Oxford, UK: Wiley-Blackwell.
    _Socrates_ presents a compelling case for some life-changing conclusions that follow from a close reading of Socrates' arguments. Offers a highly original study of Socrates and his thought, accessible to contemporary readers Argues that through studying Socrates we can learn practical wisdom to apply to our lives Lovingly crafted with humour, thought-experiments and literary references, and with close reading sof key Socratic arguments Aids readers with diagrams to make clear complex arguments.
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  34. Socrates, Piety, and Nominalism.George Rudebusch - 2009 - Skepsis: A Journal for Philosophy and Interdisciplinary Research 20:216-221.
    The argument used by Socrates to refute the thesis that piety is what all the gods love is one of the most well known in the history of philosophy. Yet some fundamental points of interpretation have gone unnoticed. I will show that (i) the strategy of Socrates' argument refutes not only Euthyphro's theory of piety and such neighboring doctrines as cultural relativism and subjectivism, but nominalism in general; moreover, that (ii) the argument needs to assume much less than is generally (...)
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  35. Inferring Character From Reasoning: The Example of Euthyphro.Jonathan Adler & Iakovos Vasiliou - 2008 - American Philosophical Quarterly 45 (1):43 - 56.
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  36. Defence of Socrates, Euthyphro, Crito.David Gallop (ed.) - 2008 - Oxford University Press.
    These new translations of the Defence of Socrates, the Euthyphro, and the Crito present Plato's remarkable dramatizations of the momentous events surrounding the trial of Socrates in 399 BC, on charges of irreligion and corrupting the young. They form a dramatic and thematic sequence, raising fundamental questions about the basis of moral, religious, legal, and political obligation. The introduction provides a stimulating philosophical and historical analysis of these texts, complemented by useful explanatory notes and an index of names.
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  37. Religion, Public Reason, and Humanism: Paul Kurtz on Fallibilism and Ethics.Eric Thomas Weber - 2008 - Contemporary Pragmatism 5 (2):131-147.
    I present a persistent religious moral theory, known as divine command theory, which conflicts with liberal political thought. John Rawls's notion of public reason offers a framework for thinking about this conflict, but it has been criticized for demanding great restrictions on religious considerations in public deliberation. I argue that although Paul Kurtz is critical of organized religion, his epistemological suggestions and ethical theory offer a feasible way to build common moral ground between atheists, secularists, and theists, so long as (...)
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  38. Self-Predication in Plato's Euthyphro?Elliot C. Welch - 2008 - Apeiron 41 (4):193-210.
  39. Euthyphro, Foucault, and Baseball: Teaching the Euthyphro.Harry Brod - 2007 - Teaching Philosophy 30 (3):249-258.
    The central question of the Euthyphro is “Is the pious loved by the gods because it is pious, or pious because it is loved?” A baseball analogy explains this to students: “Does the umpire say ‘Out’ because the runner is out, or is the runner out because the umpire says ‘Out’?” The former makes the relevant knowledge public, making Socrates the appropriate secular moral authority, while the latter makes it religious, invoking Euthyphro’s expertise. Foucault’s aphorism that power is knowledge illuminates (...)
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  40. Does Informational Semantics Commit Euthyphro's Fallacy?Jason Bridges - 2006 - Noûs 40 (3):522-547.
    In this paper, I argue that informational semantics, the most well-known and worked-out naturalistic account of intentional content, conflicts with a fundamental psychological principle about the conditions of belief-formation. Since this principle is an important premise in the argument for informational semantics, the upshot is that the view is self-contradictory??indeed, it turns out to be guilty of a sophisticated version of the fallacy famously committed by Euthyphro in the eponymous Platonic dialogue. Criticisms of naturalistic accounts of content typically proceed piecemeal (...)
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  41. The Grammar of the Soul : On Plato's Euthyphro.Michael Davis - 2006 - In Stanley Rosen & Nalin Ranasinghe (eds.), Logos and Eros: Essays Honoring Stanley Rosen. St. Augustine's Press.
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  42. Was ist das eigentlich, das Fromme? Zu Platons Dialog Eutyphron.Ulrich Diehl - 2006 - In Gregor Fitzi (ed.), Platon im Diskurs. Universitätsverlag Winter.
    This essay is a close reading analysis of Plato's Eutyphron coming to the conclusion that Plato's Socrates is still a model for an open minded, but critical attitude towards the ethical and metaphysical claims of religions.
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  43. Euthyphro's Thesis Revisited.Panos Dimas - 2006 - Phronesis 51 (1):1-28.
    It has been an interpretative dogma to condemn Euthyphro's attempt to account for piety in terms of the gods' wishes as one totally repudiated by Socrates, and in itself untenable. Still at 15c8-9 Socrates expresses some scepticism about whether his refutation of Euthyphro's original account of piety in terms of what the gods love has established that it must be abandoned altogether. He then goes on to say that he and Euthyphro ought to investigate again (πάλιν σ[unrepresentable symbol]επτέον), from the (...)
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  44. Fathers and Sons: On Piety and Humanity.Norman Fischer - 2006 - Philosophy in the Contemporary World 13 (2):24-31.
    In the Apology of Socrates, Socrates is accused of corrupting the youth. Socrates accounts for this charge by saying that the young of Athens imitate him in revealing the ignorance of their elders. Philosophy is inherently, it seems, emancipatory, since it does not take any traditional opinion as per se authoritative. In this way, it seems that philosophy is essentially opposed to piety. In this essay, I willsuggest that the last few pages of Euthyphro indicate a conception of piety that (...)
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  45. Piety as a Virtue in the Euthyphro.Russell E. Jones - 2006 - Ancient Philosophy 26 (2):385 - 390.
  46. The Euthyphro Argument (9d–11b).Brendan O'Sullivan - 2006 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 44 (4):657-675.
    A sizable literature exists concerning the structure of Socrates’ argument at Euthyphro 9d–11b. Although there is some dispute, a substitutional reading has emerged as a leading interpretation. However, some rear-guard maneuvers are in order to defend this reading against its competitors. In this paper, I articulate a substitutional reading and argue that it is invalid on two counts: one, Socrates oversteps the logic of his reductio ad absurdum, and two, he illicitly substitutes coreferring expressions in explanatory contexts. Next, I defend (...)
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  47. The Euthyphro Argument.Brendan O'Sullivan - 2006 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 44 (4):657-675.
    A sizable literature exists concerning the structure of Socrates’ argument at Euthyphro 9d–11b. Although there is some dispute, a substitutional reading has emerged as a leading interpretation. However, some rear-guard maneuvers are in order to defend this reading against its competitors. In this paper, I articulate a substitutional reading and argue that it is invalid on two counts: one, Socrates oversteps the logic of his reductio ad absurdum, and two, he illicitly substitutes coreferring expressions in explanatory contexts. Next, I defend (...)
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  48. Piety as a Virtue in the Euthyphro: A Reply.Øyvind Rabbås - 2006 - Ancient Philosophy 26 (2):391-393.
  49. Towards a Phenomenology of Gratitude.Peter R. Costello - 2005 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 79:261-277.
    In this paper, I examine Plato’s Euthyphro phenomenologically, reading the dialogue as manifesting the posture and activity of gratitude as an essential moment of piety. This phenomenon of gratitude appears directly through Euthyphro’s own remarks and indirectly through Socrates’s interaction with Euthyphro. Other recent commentators, notably Mark McPherran, David Parry, James Brouwer, and William Mann, have noted the importance of the Euthyphro as a dialogue that offers a great deal to the discussion of piety through the shape of the relationship (...)
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  50. The Euthyphro as a Philosophical Work.D. Khashaba - 2005 - Philosophy Pathways 97.
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