This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories
Siblings:
15 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Sort by:
  1. Michael Vannoy Adams (1996). The Multicultural Imagination: Race, Color, and the Unconscious. Routledge.
    The Multicultural Imagination is a challenging inquiry into the complex interrelationship between our ideas about race, color and the unconscious. Drawing on clinical case material, Michael Vannoy Adams argues that race is just as important as sex or any other content of the unconscious. He does not assume that racism will simply vanish if we psychoanalyze a patient, but shows how a non-defensive ego and a self-image that is receptive to other-images can move us towards a more productive discourse of (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Ido Amihai, Leon Deouell & Shlomo Bentin (2011). Conscious Awareness is Necessary for Processing Race and Gender Information From Faces. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (2):269-279.
    Previous studies suggested that emotions can be correctly interpreted from facial expressions in the absence of conscious awareness of the face. Our goal was to explore whether subordinate information about a face’s gender and race could also become available without awareness of the face. Participants classified the race or the gender of unfamiliar faces that were ambiguous with regard to these dimensions. The ambiguous faces were preceded by face-images that unequivocally represented gender and race, rendered consciously invisible by simultaneous continuous-flash-suppression. (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Alan Bass (2002). Historical and Unconscious Trauma: Racism and Psychoanalysis. Constellations 9 (2):274-283.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Ned Block (1999). Sexism, Ageism, Racism, and the Nature of Consciousness. Philosophical Topics 26 (1):39-70.
    If a philosophical theory led to the conclusion that the red stripes cannot look red to both men and women, both blacks and whites, both young and old, we would be reluctant (to say the least) to accept that philosophical theory. But there is a widespread philosophical view about the nature of conscious experience that, together with some empirical facts, suggests that color experience cannot be veridical for both men and women, both blacks and whites, both young and old.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Bernard R. Boxill (2010). “A Man's a Man for All That”. The Monist 93 (2):188-207.
  6. C. Colwell (1995). Typology, Racism, and The Bell Curve. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies 6 (2):103-111.
  7. Luc Faucher & Edouard Machery (2009). Racism: Against Jorge Garcia's Moral and Psychological Monism. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 39 (1):41-62.
    In this article, we argue that it can be fruitful for philosophers interested in the nature and moral significance of racism to pay more attention to psychology. We do this by showing that psychology provides new arguments against Garcia's views about the nature and moral significance of racism. We contend that some scientific studies of racial cognition undermine Garcia's moral and psychological monism about racism: Garcia disregards (1) the rich affective texture of racism and (2) the diversity of what makes (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. J. L. A. Garcia (2011). Racism, Psychology, and Morality: Dialogue with Faucher and Machery. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 41 (2):250-268.
    I here respond to several points in Faucher and Machery’s vigorous and informative critique of my volitional account of racism (VAR). First, although the authors deem it a form of "implicit racial bias," a mere tendency to associate black people with "negative" concepts falls short of racial "bias" or prejudice in the relevant sense. Second, such an associative disposition need not even be morally objectionable. Third, even for more substantial forms of implicit racial bias such as race-based fear or disgust, (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Christopher Grau (2010). American History X, Cinematic Manipulation, and Moral Conversion. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 34 (1):52-76.
    American History X (hereafter AHX) has been accused by numerous critics of a morally dangerous cinematic seduction: using stylish cinematography, editing, and sound, the film manipulates the viewer through glamorizing an immoral and hate-filled neo-nazi protagonist. In addition, there’s the disturbing fact that the film seems to accomplish this manipulation through methods commonly grouped under the category of “fascist aesthetics.” More specifically, AHX promotes its neo-nazi hero through the use of several filmic techniques made famous by Nazi propagandist Leni Riefenstahl. (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Adam Hochman (2013). Do We Need a Device to Acquire Ethnic Concepts? Philosophy of Science 80 (5):994-1005.
    Francisco Gil-White argues that the ubiquity of racialism—the view that so-called races have biological essences—can be explained as a by-product of a shared mental module dedicated to ethnic cognition. Gil-White’s theory has been endorsed, with some revisions, by Edouard Machery and Luc Faucher. In this skeptical response I argue that our developmental environments contain a wealth, rather than a poverty of racialist stimulus, rendering a nativist explanation of racialism redundant. I also argue that we should not theorize racialism in isolation (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Jules Holroyd (2012). Responsibility for Implicit Bias. Journal of Social Philosophy 43 (3):274-306.
  12. David Haekwon Kim (2007). Self-Contempt and Color-Blind Liberalism in The Accidental Asian. In E. Ann Kaplan & Susan Scheckel (eds.), Boundaries of Affect: Ethnicity and Emotion. Stony Brook University Humanities Institute.
  13. David Haekwon Kim (1999). Contempt and Ordinary Inequality. In Susan E. Babbitt & Sue Campbell (eds.), Racism and Philosophy.
  14. Sarah-Jane Leslie (forthcoming). The Original Sin of Cognition: Fear, Prejudice, and Generalization. Journal of Philosophy.
  15. Jeanine Weekes Schroer (2015). Giving Them Something They Can Feel: On the Strategy of Scientizing the Phenomenology of Race and Racism. Knowledge Cultures 3 (1):91-110.