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  1. Optimism Without Theism? Nagasawa on Atheism, Evolution, and Evil.Guy Kahane - forthcoming - Religious Studies.
    Nagasawa has argued that the suffering associated with evolution presents a greater challenge to atheism than to theism because that evil is incompatible with ‘existential optimism’ about the world—with seeing the world as an overall good place, and being thankful that we exist. I argue that even if atheism was incompatible with existential optimism in this way, this presents no threat to atheism. Moreover, it’s unclear how the suffering associated with evolution could on its own undermine existential optimism. Links between (...)
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  2. The Significance of the Past.Guy Kahane - forthcoming - Journal of the American Philosophical Association.
    The past is deeply important to many of us. But our concern about history can seem puzzling, and needs justification. After all, the past cannot be changed: we can help the living needy, but the tears we shed for the long dead victims of past tragedies help no one. Attempts to justify our concern about history typically take one of two o pposing forms. It is assumed either that such concern must be justified in instrumental or otherwise self and present (...)
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  3. Dialogue in Love as a Constitutive Act of Human Spirit.Alicja Pietras - 2021 - In Predrag Cicovacki (ed.), The Human Soul. Essays in Honor of Nalin Ranasinghe. Wilmington, Delaware, Stany Zjednoczone: pp. 91-98.
    In this essay, I will discuss the meaning of the human spirit and its place in the world. My understanding of human spirit is very similar as Nicolai Hartmann’s view but I also develop it according to my own experience. In my essay, I would like to examine two insights: (1) the first is that I am using the name “human spirit” instead of “human soul,” because I treat the body as an inseparable and necessary part of the human spirit; (...)
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  4. A Philosopher’s Guide to Discounting.Kian Mintz-Woo - 2021 - In Mark Bryant Budolfson, Tristram McPherson & David Plunkett (eds.), Philosophy and Climate Change. Oxford University Press. pp. 90-110.
    This chapter introduces several distinctions relevant to what is called the “discounting problem”, since the issue is how (future) costs and benefits are discounted to make them comparable in present terms. The author defends the claim that there are good reasons to adopt Ramsey-style discounting in the context of climate change: the Ramsey rule is robust, flexible, and well-understood. An important distinction involved in discounting—“descriptivism” and “prescriptivism”—is discussed. It is argued that, even if we adopt prescriptivism, and accept that this (...)
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  5. A Dollar Is a Dollar Is a Dollar, or Is It? Insights From Children's Reasoning About “Dirty Money”.Arber Tasimi & Susan A. Gelman - 2021 - Cognitive Science 45 (4):e12950.
    Money can take many forms—a coin or a bill, a payment for an automobile or a prize for an award, a piece from the 1989 series or the 2019 series, and so on—but despite this, money is designed to represent an amount and only that. Thus, a dollar is a dollar, in the sense that money is fungible. But when adults ordinarily think about money, they think about it in terms of its source, and in particular, its moral source (e.g., (...)
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  6. Not Fittingness, Not Reasons, and Not Value: Against the 'First' Views.Andrew Reisner - manuscript
    [May 11 version] This is part of a book project, The Pragmatic Foundations of Theoretical Reason, in which I explore the claim that both alethic and pragmatic reasons for belief are basic, but that they share a pragmatic foundation in a pluralist theory of wellbeing in which being in a positive epistemic state is a non-derivative component of wellbeing. This chapter argues that all three of fittingness first, reasons first, and value first views are false. It does so by showing (...)
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  7. Towards Post-Pandemic Sustainable and Ethical Food Systems.Matthias Kaiser, Stephen Goldson, Tatjana Buklijas, Peter Gluckman, Kristiann Allen, Anne Bardsley & Mimi E. Lam - 2021 - Food Ethics 6 (1).
    The current global COVID-19 pandemic has led to a deep and multidimensional crisis across all sectors of society. As countries contemplate their mobility and social-distancing policy restrictions, we have a unique opportunity to re-imagine the deliberative frameworks and value priorities in our food systems. Pre-pandemic food systems at global, national, regional and local scales already needed revision to chart a common vision for sustainable and ethical food futures. Re-orientation is also needed by the relevant sciences, traditionally siloed in their disciplines (...)
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  8. Para un estudio de la justicia como valor (Revista Cubana de Ciencias Sociales).José Ramón Fabelo Corzo - 2008 - Revista Cubana de Ciencias Sociales 38 (38/39):23-34.
    El estudio de la justicia como valor y del lugar que ella ocupa o debe ocupar dentro de la sociedad responde en estos momentos a una necesidad más práctica que teórica. Las reflexiones que aquí presentamos se enmarcan dentro de este contexto. Se refieren a algunos presupuestos teórico-metodológicos que necesitan ser tenidos en cuenta en el estudio de la justicia como valor, pero su móvil fundamental no está tanto en la teoría misma, como sí más allá de ella, en la (...)
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  9. Mensajes visuales deconstructivistas: ¿Un rompimiento con el paradigma de la identidad?José Ramón Fabelo Corzo & Jaime Aguilar Torija - 2015 - In José Ramón Fabelo Corzo & Jaime Aguilar Torija (eds.), Arte e identidad. Entre lo corporal y lo imaginario. Puebla, Pue., México: pp. 51-64.
    Este trabajo se propone demostrar que el diseño editorial deconstructivo, a la par que pone en jaque la identidad del lector, en la forma en la que la educación le enseñó que debe reconocerse, lo empuja a identificarse con una nueva forma de ser y comprender el mundo, adquiriendo mayor conciencia de su carácter globalizado, rizomático, polifónico y polisémico. El diseño editorial deconstructivo se levantaba en su momento contra la imposición homogeneizadora de una identidad proclive a la defensa de los (...)
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  10. El proyecto del Buen Vivir y el tema de la centralidad de la vida.José Ramón Fabelo Corzo - 2016 - In Camilo Valqui Cachi, Gilberto Garza Grimaldo, Jaime Salazar Adame, Medardo Reyes Salinas, Ángel Ascencio Romero & Cyntia Raquel Rudas Murga (eds.), Nuestra América: complejidad y unidad dialéctica de la humanidad y la naturaleza en el siglo XXI. Puebla, Pue., México: pp. 79-99.
    El trabajo argumenta el significado que ha de tener la centralidad de la vida en la construcción de un nuevo modelo de convivencia social basado en el "Buen Vivir", tal como hoy ya aparecen en las constituciones de Bolivia y Ecuador. Se enfrenta críticamente aquellas posturas que niegan la centralidad del ser humano para afirmar la de la naturaleza en esos nuevos modelos sociales.
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  11. América (Latina), ¿descubierta, inventada o construida?José Ramón Fabelo Corzo - 2016 - In José Ramón Fabelo Corzo & Eliecer Eduardo Alejo Herrera (eds.), La estética y el arte de la Academia a la Academia. Puebla, Pue., México: pp. 89-99.
    En diálogo crítico con otras posturas, el trabajo cuestiona las interpretaciones ontológica (América fue descubierta) y epistemológica (América fue inventada) de lo ocurrido a partir de 1492 en esta parte del mundo que hoy identificamos con América Latina. En su lugar propone una interpretación praxiológica (América Latina fue construida) y señala las consecuencias teóricas y prácticas de esa diferente interpretación.
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  12. Innards of Ingarden: Physiology of Time.Virgil W. Brower - 2020 - In Dominika Czakon, Natalia Anna Michna & Leszek Sosnowski (eds.), Roman Ingarden and His Times. Kraków, Poland: pp. 25-42.
    This project begins with the selective sensory experience suggested by lngarden followed by an insensitivity he insinuates to digestive processes. This is juxtaposed with an oenological explanation of phenomenal sedimentation offered by Jean-Luc Marion. It compares the dynamics of time in the former with the those of wine in the latter. Emphasis is given to lngarden's insinuation of time as fluid, liquid, or aquatic. It revisits Ingarden's physiological explanations of partially-open systems by way of the bilateral excretion and absorption of (...)
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  13. Value and Conceptions of the Whole: The Views of Dewey, Nagel, and Gamwell.William J. Meyer - 2020 - American Journal of Theology and Philosophy 41 (1):53.
    William James once suggested that the underlying difference between empiricists and rationalists is that empiricists explain wholes in terms of parts, while rationalists explain parts in relation to wholes.1 Whatever the merits of this description, it is fair to say that modern thought has predominantly followed the empiricist habit of emphasizing parts and particularity rather than wholes and totality. This essay explores the views of three philosophers who have challenged this dominant trend. In various ways, John Dewey, Thomas Nagel, and (...)
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  14. Force and Objectivity: On Impact, Form, and Receptivity to Nature in Science and Art.Eli Lichtenstein - 2019 - Dissertation, University of Michigan
    Many praise science for its systematic drive to objectivity. But scientific objectivity is in fact a species of objectivity in a broader sense, which extends to aesthetic experience and broadly artistic creativity. Objectivity should be understood as outwardness, or receptivity to basic features of the world. Scientific objectivity is receptivity to basic features of the world specifically by adopting their 'point of view'. It is not a 'view from nowhere', in the sense of a globally- or universally-valid perspective. Nor is (...)
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  15. Life as Normative Activity and Self-realization: Debate surrounding the Concept of Biological Normativity in Goldstein and Canguilhem.Agustin Ostachuk - 2015 - História, Ciências, Saúde - Manguinhos 22 (4):1199-1214.
    The influence of Kurt Goldstein on the thinking of Georges Canguilhem extended throughout his entire work. This paper seeks to examine this relationship in order to conduct a study of the norm as a nexus or connection between the concept and life. Consequently, this work will be a reflection on the approach to life as a normative activity and self-realization. For this, it will be necessary to redefine the concepts of health and disease, and make a crossover between the two. (...)
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  16. Life: the Center of our Existence.Agustin Ostachuk - 2018 - Ludus Vitalis 26 (50):257-260.
    Life is the center of our existence. One would be tempted to say that first of all we live. However, our existence does not seem to pass in that modality. The exacerbated materialism in which our existence takes place, displaces life from the center of the scene. Our society is organized around production, consumerism, exploitation, efficiency, trade and propaganda. That is to say, our existence seems to have economy as the center of organization of our activities. The struggle of this (...)
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  17. Moral Archetypes - Ethics in Prehistory.Roberto Arruda - 2019 - Terra à Vista - ISBN-10: 1698168292 ISBN-13: 978-1698168296.
    ABSTRACT The philosophical tradition approaches to morals have their grounds predominantly on metaphysical and theological concepts and theories. Among the traditional ethics concepts, the most prominent is the Divine Command Theory (DCT). As per the DCT, God gives moral foundations to the humankind by its creation and through Revelation. Morality and Divinity are inseparable since the most remote civilization. These concepts submerge in a theological framework and are largely accepted by most followers of the three Abrahamic traditions: Judaism, Christianity, and (...)
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  18. The Ideological Matrix of Science: Natural Selection and Immunity as Case Studies.Agustin Ostachuk - 2019 - Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 15 (1):182-213.
    The modern concept of ideology was established by the liberal politician and philosopher Destutt de Tracy, with the objective of creating an all-embracing and general science of ideas, which followed the sensualist and empiricist trend initiated by Locke that culminated in the positivism of Comte. Natural selection and immunity are two key concepts in the history of biology that were strongly based on the Malthusian concept of struggle for existence. This concept wrongly assumed that population grew faster than the means (...)
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  19. Narratives, Values, and Medicine.Dien Ho - 2019 - Chronicle of Narrative Medicine.
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  20. Sartre, Heidegger, and the Origin of Value.Ronald Cordero - 2018 - Philosophy and Theology 30 (2):321-331.
    Where does value come from? How does it continue in existence? Can it disappear? In this paper I argue, in a direction suggested by Sartre and Heidegger, that value is an objective feature of reality which exists because of choices made by conscious beings. Specifically, I argue that both the existence of correctness and the existence of goodness rest on types of choosing—choosing to do and choosing to care, respectively.
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  21. On Existence and Value. Du Zhou - unknown
    It may be a deep, yet often ignored, human need for a human being to have value. In this paper, I firstly point out the problem of value, which is, roughly, how to find a way for a human being to have value. Then, I point out the problem of existence, which is a related problem, which is, roughly, how to affirm existence in an absolute manner. After that, I propose a solution to the problem of existence, which is a (...)
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  22. Korean Nunchi and Well-Being.Seth Robertson - 2019 - Science, Religion and Culture 6 (1):103-109.
    “Nunchi” is a Korean term that indicates an expert facility in social interactions and especially the ability to interpret and utilize indirect communication with ease and alacrity. In this paper, I introduce and discuss the concept of nunchi with a focus on two main senses in which it is used: as a skill and as a burden. Then, I discuss the relation of nunchi to well-being and flourishing, both in specifically Korean cultural contexts and in social contexts more generally. Finally, (...)
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  23. Trust in Food and Trust in Science.Matthias Kaiser & Anne Algers - 2017 - Food Ethics 1 (2):93-95.
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  24. Hedonic Rationality.Jennifer Corns - forthcoming - In Philosophy of Suffering. Routledge.
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  25. Language: Functionalism Versus Authenticity.Peter McGuire - 2006 - Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology 6 (2):1-13.
    This paper sets out to demonstrate that a phenomenological reflection on language highlights the possibilities of authenticity in communication, and as such provides a very necessary complement to the dominant linguistic perspectives: the syntactic and grammatical perspective, Saussurean linguistics, and systemic functional linguistics. While the syntactic and grammatical perspective, which predominates in the educational context, presents language as an institutionalized, authoritarian and self-contained system, Saussurean linguistics provides a view of language as a complex, self-contained, technical system, as such reflecting the (...)
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  26. A Revision of the South Africanagamasallied Toagama Hispidaanda. Atra.G. A. Boulenger & J. H. Power - 1921 - Transactions of the Royal Society of South Africa 9 (3):229-287.
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  27. The Body as Source of Prudential Value.Thomas Schramme - 2011 - In Sebastian Schleidgen (ed.), Human Nature and Self Design. Mentis. pp. 67-81.
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  28. Is Equality Essentially Comparative?Michael Weber - 2007 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 10 (2):209-226.
    Larry Temkin has shown that Derek Parfit’s well-known Mere Addition Paradox suggests a powerful argument for the intransitivity of the relation “better than.” The crux of the argument is the view that equality is essentially comparative, according to which the same inequality can be evaluated differently depending on what it is being compared to. The comparative view of equality should be rejected, I argue, and hence so too this argument for intransitivity.
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  29. Immortality, Identity, and Desirability.Roman Altshuler - 2015 - In Michael Cholbi (ed.), Immortality and the Philosophy of Death. Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 191-203.
    Williams’s famous argument against immortality rests on the idea that immortality cannot be desirable, at least for human beings, and his contention has spawned a cottage industry of responses. As I will intend to show, the arguments over his view rest on both a difference of temperament and a difference in the sense of desire being used. The former concerns a difference in whether one takes a forward-looking or a backward-looking perspective on personal identity; the latter a distinction between our (...)
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  30. What is Value? [REVIEW]C. S. - 1972 - Review of Metaphysics 25 (4):751-751.
    In a fluent, easy-to-read style, Frondizi presents a useful, elementary analysis of the nature of value; the basic problems of value theory; an historical survey of the various solutions to these problems; and finally, his own theory concerning the answers to these issues. The basic problem of axiology is exposed by the author as the dilemma between subjectivism and objectivism. It is in this frame of reference that the views of R. B. Perry, Wittgenstein, Carnap, Ayer, and Russell are briefly (...)
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  31. The Moral Judgment. [REVIEW]S. C. N. - 1964 - Review of Metaphysics 17 (3):485-486.
    The editor of this anthology discusses the distinction between normative ethics and meta-ethics, and provides lucid organizational prefaces to each of the five chapters. The first four are arranged on a "thesis-reply" model. For example, essays by Ayer and Stevenson present an 'emotive-imperative' account of moral judgments, while essays by Blanshard and Baier afford critical replies. There are similarly arranged treatments of objectivism, subjectivism and instrumentalism. The final chapter is given over to "new directions" in meta-ethical theory, and contains readings (...)
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  32. Spinoza's Anti-Humanism: An Outline.Yitzhak Y. Melamed - 2011 - In Smith Justin & Fraenkel Carlos (eds.), The Rationalists. Springer/Synthese. pp. 147--166.
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  33. Materialism and Value.J. Post - 1995 - In Paul K. Moser & J. D. Trout (eds.), Contemporary Materialism: A Reader. Routledge. pp. 374.
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  34. The Case Against Evaluative Realism.Dan López de Sa - 2006 - Theoria: Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia 21 (3):277-294.
    In this paper I offer a characterization of evaluative realism, present the intuitive case against it, and offer two considerations to support it further: one concerning the internalist connection between values and motivation, and the other concerning the intuitibve causal inefficacy of evaluative properties. The considerations ultimately rely on the former intuitions themselves, but are not devoid of interest, as they might make one revise what one took to be his own realistic supporting intuitions, if such one had.
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  35. Human Language as a Tool of Lie.Constantinos Maritsas - 2010 - Cultura 7 (2):234-244.
    The problem of human language is studied in the context of the definition “civilization” on the basis of Darwin’s theory. The author defines civilization as “survival of the unfit”. The author supposes that language was invented by the men to describe their heroic deeds for the women in order to be selected by them for reproduction. In other words, language became a selection criterion together with beauty and presents.
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  36. Value and the Regulation of the Sentiments.Justin D’Arms - 2013 - Philosophical Studies 163 (1):3-13.
    “Sentiment” is a term of art, intended to refer to object-directed, irruptive states, that occur in relatively transient bouts involving positive or negative affect, and that typically involve a distinctive motivational profile. Not all the states normally called “emotions” are sentiments in the sense just characterized. And all the terms for sentiments are sometimes used in English to refer to longer lasting attitudes. But this discussion is concerned with boutish affective states, not standing attitudes. That poses some challenges that will (...)
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  37. Libres Paroles Ii.Claude Ber - 2011 - Chèvre-Feuille Étoilée Poche.
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  38. The Transformation of the Human Dimension in the Cyberspace.Karamjit S. Gill - 2012 - AI and Society 27 (4):429-430.
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  39. The Concepts of Value.S. C. A. - 1973 - Review of Metaphysics 27 (2):372-373.
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  40. Reality, Knowledge and Value.A. T. - 1971 - Review of Metaphysics 25 (2):368-369.
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  41. Partiality and Intrinsic Value.Michael J. Zimmerman - 2011 - Mind 120 (478):447-483.
    The fitting-attitudes analysis of value, which states that something's being good consists in its being the fitting object of some pro-attitude, has recently been the focus of intense debate. Many objections have been levelled against this analysis. One objection to it concerns the ‘challenge from partiality’, according to which it can be fitting to display partiality toward objects of equal value. Several responses to the challenge have been proposed. This paper criticizes these and other responses and then offers a response (...)
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  42. Evaluative Vs. Deontic Concepts.Christine Tappolet - 2013 - In Hugh Lafollette (ed.), International Encyclopedia of Ethics. Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 1791-99.
    Ethical thought is articulated around normative concepts. Standard examples of normative concepts are good, reason, right, ought, and obligatory. Theorists often treat the normative as an undifferentiated domain. Even so, it is common to distinguish between two kinds of normative concepts: evaluative or axiological concepts, such as good, and deontic concepts, such as ought. This encyclopedia entry discusses the many differences between the two kinds of concepts.
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  43. Grounding Morality.J. Sharma A. Raguramaraju (ed.) - 2010 - Routledge.
    Mrinal Miri has been one of the most influential philosophers in recent times, apart from also being a teacher, writer and academic administrator. He has written on a variety of topics in the areas of tribal identity and ethics, and has substantial contributions in the areas of analytical philosophy, political philosophy and Gandhian thought. -/- The essays in this volume seek to enhance and restate these themes, especially in moral and Gandhian philosophy, ethics and questions of identity, and offer a (...)
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  44. Anthropocentric Constraints on Human Value.Daniel Jacobson & Justin D'Arms - 2006 - Oxford Studies in Metaethics 1:99-126.
    According to Cicero, “all emotions spring from the roots of error: they should not be pruned or clipped here and there, but yanked out” (Cicero 2002: 60). The Stoic enthusiasm for the extirpation of emotion is radical in two respects, both of which can be expressed with the claim that emotional responses are never appropriate. First, the Stoics held that emotions are incompatible with virtue , since the virtuous man will retain his equanimity whatever his fate. Grief is always vicious, (...)
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  45. The Conception of Value.David B. Wong - 1993 - Philosophical Books 34 (1):45-47.
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  46. The Feeling of Being a Person.René Rosfort & Giovanni Stanghellini - 2009 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 16 (3):283-288.
  47. Knowledge and the Justification of Values in Values-Based Medicine.Benedict Smith - 2008 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 15 (2):97-105.
  48. Foresight and Responsibility.Thomas Baldwin - 1979 - Philosophy 54 (209):347 - 360.
    Where a man foresaw that through its consequences his action would violate a law, is he for that reason to be judged responsible for the violation of the law? The principle that such a man is responsible, and thus that foresight is sufficient for responsibility, has long been accepted in both legal and moral theory. But in recent years anxieties about this principle have been expressed by both philosophers and lawyers. What one commonly finds in older books, both legal and (...)
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  49. John Broome "Weighing Lives".G. Cullity - unknown
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  50. The Open Self.Charles Morris - 1948 - New York: Prentice-Hall.
    This is a new release of the original 1948 edition.
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