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  1. Korean Nunchi and Well-Being.Seth Robertson - 2019 - Science, Religion and Culture 6 (1):103-109.
    “Nunchi” is a Korean term that indicates an expert facility in social interactions and especially the ability to interpret and utilize indirect communication with ease and alacrity. In this paper, I introduce and discuss the concept of nunchi with a focus on two main senses in which it is used: as a skill and as a burden. Then, I discuss the relation of nunchi to well-being and flourishing, both in specifically Korean cultural contexts and in social contexts more generally. Finally, (...)
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  2. Hedonic Rationality.Jennifer Corns - forthcoming - In Philosophy of Suffering. Routledge.
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  3. Language: Functionalism Versus Authenticity.Peter McGuire - 2006 - Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology 6 (2):1-13.
    This paper sets out to demonstrate that a phenomenological reflection on language highlights the possibilities of authenticity in communication, and as such provides a very necessary complement to the dominant linguistic perspectives: the syntactic and grammatical perspective, Saussurean linguistics, and systemic functional linguistics. While the syntactic and grammatical perspective, which predominates in the educational context, presents language as an institutionalized, authoritarian and self-contained system, Saussurean linguistics provides a view of language as a complex, self-contained, technical system, as such reflecting the (...)
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  4. Why Bother: Is Life Worth Living?John J. McDermott - 1991 - Journal of Philosophy 88 (11):677-683.
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  5. A Revision of the South Africanagamasallied Toagama Hispidaanda. Atra.G. A. Boulenger & J. H. Power - 1921 - Transactions of the Royal Society of South Africa 9 (3):229-287.
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  6. Real‐World Love Drugs: Reply to Nyholm.Hichem Naar - 2016 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 33 (2):197-201.
    In a recent article, Sven Nyholm argues that the use of biomedical enhancements in our romantic relationships would fail to secure the final value we attribute to love. On Nyholm's view, one thing we desire for its own sake is to be at the origin of the love others have for us. The satisfaction of this desire, he argues, is incompatible with the use of BE insofar as they are responsible for the attachment characteristic of love. In particular, the use (...)
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  7. The Body as Source of Prudential Value.Thomas Schramme - 2011 - In Sebastian Schleidgen (ed.), Human Nature and Self Design. Mentis. pp. 67-81.
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  8. Is Equality Essentially Comparative?Michael Weber - 2007 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 10 (2):209-226.
    Larry Temkin has shown that Derek Parfit’s well-known Mere Addition Paradox suggests a powerful argument for the intransitivity of the relation “better than.” The crux of the argument is the view that equality is essentially comparative, according to which the same inequality can be evaluated differently depending on what it is being compared to. The comparative view of equality should be rejected, I argue, and hence so too this argument for intransitivity.
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  9. Immortality, Identity, and Desirability.Roman Altshuler - 2015 - In Michael Cholbi (ed.), Immortality and the Philosophy of Death. Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 191-203.
    Williams’s famous argument against immortality rests on the idea that immortality cannot be desirable, at least for human beings, and his contention has spawned a cottage industry of responses. As I will intend to show, the arguments over his view rest on both a difference of temperament and a difference in the sense of desire being used. The former concerns a difference in whether one takes a forward-looking or a backward-looking perspective on personal identity; the latter a distinction between our (...)
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  10. What is Value? [REVIEW]C. S. - 1972 - Review of Metaphysics 25 (4):751-751.
    In a fluent, easy-to-read style, Frondizi presents a useful, elementary analysis of the nature of value; the basic problems of value theory; an historical survey of the various solutions to these problems; and finally, his own theory concerning the answers to these issues. The basic problem of axiology is exposed by the author as the dilemma between subjectivism and objectivism. It is in this frame of reference that the views of R. B. Perry, Wittgenstein, Carnap, Ayer, and Russell are briefly (...)
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  11. The Moral Judgment. [REVIEW]S. C. N. - 1964 - Review of Metaphysics 17 (3):485-486.
    The editor of this anthology discusses the distinction between normative ethics and meta-ethics, and provides lucid organizational prefaces to each of the five chapters. The first four are arranged on a "thesis-reply" model. For example, essays by Ayer and Stevenson present an 'emotive-imperative' account of moral judgments, while essays by Blanshard and Baier afford critical replies. There are similarly arranged treatments of objectivism, subjectivism and instrumentalism. The final chapter is given over to "new directions" in meta-ethical theory, and contains readings (...)
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  12. Real Estate: Foundations of the Ontology of Property.Barry Smith - 2003 - In Heiner Stuckenschmidt, Erik Stubjkaer & Christoph Schlieder (eds.), The Ontology and Modelling of Real Estate Transactions. Ashgate. pp. 51-67.
    Suppose you own a garden-variety object such as a hat or a shirt. Your property right then follows the ageold saw according to which possession is nine-tenths of the law. That is, your possession of a shirt constitutes a strong presumption in favor of your ownership of the shirt. In the case of land, however, this is not the case. Here possession is not only not a strong presumption in favor of ownership; it is not even clear what possession is. (...)
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  13. Anthropocentric Constraints on Human Value.Justin D'Arms & Daniel Jacobson - 2006 - Oxford Studies in Metaethics 1:99-126.
  14. Spinoza's Anti-Humanism: An Outline.Yitzhak Y. Melamed - 2011 - In Smith Justin & Fraenkel Carlos (eds.), The Rationalists. Springer/Synthese. pp. 147--166.
  15. The Case Against Evaluative Realism.Dan López de Sa - 2006 - Theoria: Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia 21 (3):277-294.
    In this paper I offer a characterization of evaluative realism, present the intuitive case against it, and offer two considerations to support it further: one concerning the internalist connection between values and motivation, and the other concerning the intuitibve causal inefficacy of evaluative properties. The considerations ultimately rely on the former intuitions themselves, but are not devoid of interest, as they might make one revise what one took to be his own realistic supporting intuitions, if such one had.
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  16. Human Language as a Tool of Lie.Constantinos Maritsas - 2010 - Cultura 7 (2):234-244.
    The problem of human language is studied in the context of the definition “civilization” on the basis of Darwin’s theory. The author defines civilization as “survival of the unfit”. The author supposes that language was invented by the men to describe their heroic deeds for the women in order to be selected by them for reproduction. In other words, language became a selection criterion together with beauty and presents.
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  17. Value and the Regulation of the Sentiments.Justin D’Arms - 2013 - Philosophical Studies 163 (1):3-13.
    “Sentiment” is a term of art, intended to refer to object-directed, irruptive states, that occur in relatively transient bouts involving positive or negative affect, and that typically involve a distinctive motivational profile. Not all the states normally called “emotions” are sentiments in the sense just characterized. And all the terms for sentiments are sometimes used in English to refer to longer lasting attitudes. But this discussion is concerned with boutish affective states, not standing attitudes. That poses some challenges that will (...)
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  18. Libres Paroles Ii.Claude Ber - 2011 - Chèvre-Feuille Étoilée Poche.
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  19. The Transformation of the Human Dimension in the Cyberspace.Karamjit S. Gill - 2012 - AI and Society 27 (4):429-430.
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  20. The Concepts of Value.S. C. A. - 1973 - Review of Metaphysics 27 (2):372-373.
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  21. Reality, Knowledge and Value.A. T. - 1971 - Review of Metaphysics 25 (2):368-369.
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  22. Partiality and Intrinsic Value.Michael J. Zimmerman - 2011 - Mind 120 (478):447-483.
    The fitting-attitudes analysis of value, which states that something's being good consists in its being the fitting object of some pro-attitude, has recently been the focus of intense debate. Many objections have been levelled against this analysis. One objection to it concerns the ‘challenge from partiality’, according to which it can be fitting to display partiality toward objects of equal value. Several responses to the challenge have been proposed. This paper criticizes these and other responses and then offers a response (...)
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  23. Evaluative Vs. Deontic Concepts.Christine Tappolet - 2013 - In Hugh Lafollette (ed.), International Encyclopedia of Ethics. Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 1791-99.
    Ethical thought is articulated around normative concepts. Standard examples of normative concepts are good, reason, right, ought, and obligatory. Theorists often treat the normative as an undifferentiated domain. Even so, it is common to distinguish between two kinds of normative concepts: evaluative or axiological concepts, such as good, and deontic concepts, such as ought. This encyclopedia entry discusses the many differences between the two kinds of concepts.
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  24. Grounding Morality.J. Sharma A. Raguramaraju (ed.) - 2010 - Routledge.
    Mrinal Miri has been one of the most influential philosophers in recent times, apart from also being a teacher, writer and academic administrator. He has written on a variety of topics in the areas of tribal identity and ethics, and has substantial contributions in the areas of analytical philosophy, political philosophy and Gandhian thought. -/- The essays in this volume seek to enhance and restate these themes, especially in moral and Gandhian philosophy, ethics and questions of identity, and offer a (...)
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  25. The Conception of Value.David B. Wong - 1993 - Philosophical Books 34 (1):45-47.
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  26. Foresight and Responsibility.Thomas Baldwin - 1979 - Philosophy 54 (209):347 - 360.
    Where a man foresaw that through its consequences his action would violate a law, is he for that reason to be judged responsible for the violation of the law? The principle that such a man is responsible, and thus that foresight is sufficient for responsibility, has long been accepted in both legal and moral theory. But in recent years anxieties about this principle have been expressed by both philosophers and lawyers. What one commonly finds in older books, both legal and (...)
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  27. John Broome "Weighing Lives".G. Cullity - unknown
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  28. The Open Self.Charles W. Morris - 1948 - New York: Prentice-Hall.
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  29. The Problem of Value.A. C. Graham - 1961 - London: Hutchinson University Library.
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  30. New Methods of Knowledge and Value.Robert E. Shiller - 1966 - New York: Philosophical Library.
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  31. Knowledge and Value.Elmer Sprague - 1967 - New York: Harcourt, Brace & World.
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  32. Prolegomenon to a History of Prudence: A Critical Synthesis.Eugene Garver - 1987 - Social Epistemology 1 (1):61 – 82.
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  33. Corruption, Politics, and Societal Values in Tanzania.Bruce Heilman, Ng'wanza Kamata & Laurean Ndumbaro - 2000 - Journal of Social Philosophy 31 (4):497–506.
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  34. Why Humans Judge Things to Be Good.Richard Joyce - 2004 - Biology and Philosophy 19 (5):809-817.
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  35. Values and Value Judgments.Stephen C. Pepper - 1949 - Journal of Philosophy 46 (14):429-434.
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  36. Reality, Knowledge and Value: A Basic Introduction to Philosophy.Jerome A. Shaffer - 1971 - New York: Random House.
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  37. Intransitivity and the Person-Affecting Principle: A Response.Larry S. Temkin - 1999 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 59 (3):777-784.
    In "Intrzmsitivity and thc Person-Affecting Principlc,"‘ (IPAP) Alastair Norcross attacks several key claims of my "Intransitivity and thc Merc Addition Paradox" (IMAP).2 This article suggests that N0rcross’s arguments despite: their appca1——lcavc IMAP’s claims mostly intact. Bcforc assessing N0rcross’s arguments, lct mc characterize two key notions distinguished in IMAP: an essentially comparative view of moral ideals and an intrinsic aspect view. On an essentially comparative view (ECU, different factors might bc relevant for comparing diffcrcnt alternatives regarding a given idcal. On such (...)
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Theories of Value
  1. “CHOICE: An Objective, Voluntaristic Theory of Prudential Value,” (Pre-Publication Draft).Walter Horn - forthcoming - Philosophia:1-25.
    It is customary to think that Objective List (“OL), Desire-Satisfaction (“D-S”) and Hedonistic (“HED”) theories of prudential value pretty much cover the waterfront, and that those of the three that are “subjective” are naturalistic (in the sense attacked by Moore, Ross and Ewing), while those that are “objective” must be Platonic, Aristotelian or commit the naturalist fallacy. I here argue for a theory that is both naturalistic (because voluntaristic) and objective but neither Platonic, Aristotelian, nor (I hope) fallacious. In addition, (...)
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  2. In Defense of an End-Relational Account of Goodness.Brian Coffey - 2014 - Dissertation, University of California, Davis
    What is it exactly that we are attributing to a thing when we judge it to be good? According to the orthodox answer, at least in some cases when we judge that something is good we are attributing to it a monadic property. That is, good things are “just plain good.” I reject the orthodox view. In arguing against it, I begin with the idea that a plausible account of goodness must take seriously the intuitive claim that there is something (...)
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  3. Bioconservatism, Partiality, and the Human-Nature Objection to Enhancement.Pugh Jonathan, Guy Kahane & Julian Savulescu - 2016 - The Monist 99 (4):406-422.
    “Bioconservatives” in the human enhancement debate endorse the conservative claim that we should reject the use of biotechnologies that enhance natural human capacities. However, they often ground their objections to enhancement with contestable claims about human nature that are also in tension with other common tenets of conservatism. We argue that bioconservatives could raise a more plausible objection to enhancement by invoking a strain of conservative thought developed by G.A. Cohen. Although Cohen’s conservatism is not sufficient to fully revive the (...)
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  4. Toward A New Axiology.Federico Gay - 1973 - Southwest Philosophical Studies.
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  5. Toward An Axiology Of Nature.Richard Leggett - 1975 - Southwest Philosophical Studies.
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  6. Pain, Pleasure, and the Intentionality of Emotions as Experiences of Values: A New Phenomenological Perspective.Panos Theodorou - 2014 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 13 (4):625-641.
    The article starts with a brief overview of the kinds of approaches that have been attempted for the presentation of Phenomenology’s view on the emotions. I then pass to Husserl’s unsatisfactory efforts to disclose the intentionality of emotions and their intentional correlation with values. Next, I outline the idea of a new, “normalized phenomenological” approach of emotions and values. Pleasure and pain, then, are first explored as affective feelings . In the cases examined, it is shown that, primordially, pleasure and (...)
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  7. Formal Axiology and its Critics.Rem B. Edwards (ed.) - 1995 - Rodopi.
    Formal Axiology and Its Critics consists of two parts, both of which present criticisms of the formal theory of values developed by Robert S. Hartman, replies to these criticisms, plus a short introduction to formal axiology.Part I consists of articles published or made public during the lifetime of Hartman to which he personally replied. It contains previously published replies to Hector Neri Castañeda, William Eckhardt, and Robert S. Brumbaugh, and previously unpublished replies to Charles Hartshorne, Rem B. Edwards, Robert E. (...)
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  8. Reason-Based Value or Value-Based Reasons?Sven Nyholm - 2006 - In Björn Haglund & Helge Malmgren (eds.), Kvantifikator För En Dag. Essays Dedicated to Dag Westerståhl on His Sixtieth Birthday. Philosophical Communications. pp. 193-202.
    In this paper, I discuss practical reasons and value, assuming a coexistence thesis according to which reasons and value always go together. I start by doing some taxonomy, distinguishing among three different ways of accounting for the relation between practical reasons and the good. I argue that, of these views, the most plausible one is that according to which something’s being good just consists in how certain facts about the thing in question – other than that of how it is (...)
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  9. Axiology, and Science.Sigmund Koch - 1969 - In Marjorie Glicksman Grene (ed.), The Anatomy of Knowledge: Papers Presented to the Study Group on Foundations of Cultural Unity, Bowdoin College, 1965 and 1966. London: Routledge and Kegan Paul. pp. 119.
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  10. Art as an Axiology of Man.E. Moutsopoulos - 1987 - Filosofia 17:120-152.
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  11. The Foundations of Axiology.B. Zboril - 1992 - Filosoficky Casopis 40 (3):468-475.
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  12. Cohen’s Conservatism and Human Enhancement.Jonathan Pugh, Guy Kahane & Julian Savulescu - 2013 - The Journal of Ethics 17 (4):331-354.
    In an intriguing essay, G. A. Cohen has defended a conservative bias in favour of existing value. In this paper, we consider whether Cohen’s conservatism raises a new challenge to the use of human enhancement technologies. We develop some of Cohen’s suggestive remarks into a new line of argument against human enhancement that, we believe, is in several ways superior to existing objections. However, we shall argue that on closer inspection, Cohen’s conservatism fails to offer grounds for a strong sweeping (...)
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  13. Chapter 1: AXIOLOGY-Formal Axiology of Henryk Elzenberg.Leslaw Hostynski - 2009 - Dialogue and Universalism 19 (8-9):19.
    The article is a presentation of Henryk Elzenberg’s system of formal axiology He is one of the most eminent Polish axiologists and moral philosophers of the 20th century. His system of philosophy of value is built on three pillars: a clear differentiation between two concepts of value: utilitarian and perfect; connection of the concept of perfect value with that of obligation by definition; approaches obligation pertaining to being as oppose to deed. The starting point is differentiation into utilitarian value and (...)
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