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  1. What Do Incels Want? Explaining Incel Violence Using Beauvoirian Otherness.Filipa Melo Lopes - forthcoming - Hypatia.
    In recent years, online ‘involuntary celibate’ or ‘incel’ communities have been linked to various deadly attacks targeting women. Why do these men react to romantic rejection with, not just disappointment, but murderous rage? Feminists have claimed this is because incels desire women as objects or, alternatively, because they feel entitled to women’s attention. I argue that both of these explanatory models are insufficient. They fail to account for incels’ distinctive ambivalence towards women — for their oscillation between obsessive desire and (...)
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  2. Oxford Handbook of Feminist Philosophy.Ásta Sveinsdóttir & Kim Q. Hall (eds.) - 2021
    This exciting new Handbook offers a comprehensive overview of the contemporary state of the field in feminist philosophy. The editors' introduction and forty-five essays cover feminist critical engagements with philosophy and adjacent scholarly fields, as well as feminist approaches to current debates and crises across the world. Authors cover topics ranging from the ways in which feminist philosophy attends to other systems of oppression, and the gendered, racialized, and classed assumptions embedded in philosophical concepts, to feminist perspectives on prominent subfields (...)
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  3. How Terrorism is Wrong: Morality and Political Violence. By Virginia Held.Susan Hawthorne - 2012 - Hypatia 27 (1):219-222.
  4. Domestic Abuse as Terrorism.Jay Sloan‐Lynch - 2012 - Hypatia 27 (4):774-790.
    A number of philosophers and feminist authors have recently equated domestic abuse with the ubiquitous and ill-defined concept of “terrorism.” Claudia Card, for instance, argues that domestic abuse is a frequently ignored form of terrorism that creates and maintains “heterosexual male dominance and female dependence and service”. Alison Jaggar, in a recent article, also concludes that an acceptable definition of terrorism will find rape and domestic violence to be terrorist acts. Yet there seem to be several obstacles to any simple (...)
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  5. In a Time of Terror: Globalisation, Transformation and the Enlightenment.Raymond Aaron Younis - 2009 - In Philip Quadrio Carrol Besseling (ed.), Politics and religion in the new century: philosophical reflections. Sydney: Sydney University Press. pp. 233-258.
    A critical analysis and evaluation of Habermas' and Derrida's understanding of terrorism (in particular 9/11); some reflections on the role of philosophy and philosophers in the present age.
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  6. The Human Rights of Others: Sovereignty, Legitimacy, and "Just Causes" for the "War on Terror".Margaret Denike - 2008 - Hypatia 23 (2):pp. 95-121.
    In this essay, Denike assesses the appropriation of international human rights by humanitarian law and policy of "security states." She maps representations of the perpetrators and victims of "tyranny" and "terror, " and their role in providing a "just cause" for the U.S.–led "war on terror. " By examining narratives of progress and human rights heroism Denike shows how human rights discourses, when used together with the pretense of self-defense and preemptive war, do the opposite of what they claim—entrenching the (...)
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  7. The Human Rights of Others: Sovereignty, Legitimacy, and “Just Causes” for the “War on Terror”.Margaret Denike - 2008 - Hypatia 23 (2):95-121.
    In this essay, Denike assesses the appropriation of international human rights by humanitarian law and policy of “security states.” She maps representations of the perpetrators and victims of “tyranny” and “terror,” and their role in providing a “just cause” for the U.S.-led “war on terror.” By examining narratives of progress and human rights heroism Denike shows how human rights discourses, when used together with the pretense of self-defense and preemptive war, do the opposite of what they claim—entrenching the sovereignty of (...)
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  8. Sovereignty and Suffering : Towards an Ethics of Grief in a Post-9/11 World.David S. Gutterman & Sara L. Rushing - 2008 - In Terrell Carver & Samuel Allen Chambers (eds.), Judith Butler's Precarious Politics: Critical Encounters. Routledge.
  9. Gender Trouble at Abu Ghraib?Timothy Kaufman-Osborn - 2008 - In Terrell Carver & Samuel Allen Chambers (eds.), Judith Butler's Precarious Politics: Critical Encounters. Routledge.
  10. Introduction: Thinking About War.Bat-ami Bar On - 2008 - Hypatia 23 (2):vii-xv.
  11. Just War and the Problem of Evil.Robin May Schott - 2008 - Hypatia 23 (2):122-140.
    In this essay, Robin May Schott criticizes leading proponents of just war theory and introduces the notion of justifiable but illegitimate violence. Instead of legitimating some wars as just, it is better to acknowledge that both the situation of war and moral judgments about war are ambiguous. Schott raises the questions: What are alternative narratives of war? And what are alternative narratives to war? Such narratives are necessary for addressing the concepts of evil and of witnessing in the ethical discourse (...)
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  12. Female Terrorists: What Difference Does Gender Make?Marilyn Friedman - 2007 - Social Philosophy Today 23:189-200.
    Should women’s terrorist acts be understood differently than similar acts carried out by men? Does the gender identity of a terrorist make a difference to the meaning of a terrorist’s acts? Commentators who explain women’s involvement in terrorism often offer explanations other than political commitment. They often refer instead to factors in the women’s personal relationships, thereby drawing on gender stereotypes and diminishing the women’s political commitments. I suggest instead that terrorism by a woman involves symbolic political “testimony.” It amounts (...)
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  13. Gay Marriage and the War on Terror.Bonnie Mann - 2007 - Hypatia 22 (1):247-251.
  14. How America Justifies Its War: A Modern/Postmodern Aesthetics of Masculinity and Sovereignty.Bonnie Mann - 2006 - Hypatia 21 (4):147-163.
    The lies about the reasons for the U.S. war against Iraq provoked no mass public outcry in the United States against the war. What is the process of justification for this war, a process that seems to need no reasons? Mann argues that the process of justification is not a process of rational deliberation but one of aesthetic self-constitution, of rebuilding a masculine national identity. Included is a feminist reading of the National Defense University document Shock and Awe.
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  15. Stakeholders and Terrorists: On Carol Gould’s Democratizing Globalization and Human Rights.David Schweickart - 2006 - Radical Philosophy Today 2006:269-275.
    Schweickart argues that Gould in her most recent book seems to have shifted away from the notion of economic democracy as “one person, one vote” to a less radical modified stakeholder view in which the various constituents of the economic enterprise, including employees, stockholders, and managers, share in decision-making power. Noting that Gould does not explain why she holds that workplace democracy is a too stringent participatory demand, Schweickart brings up a variety of arguments that might be offered in support (...)
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  16. Philosophy 9/11: Thinking About the War on Terrorism.Timothy Shanahan (ed.) - 2005 - Open Court.
    Fifteen philosophers turn their thoughts to international terrorism and the war that it has spawned, lending their expertise in law, ethics, politics, feminism, ...
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  17. Questions Regarding a War on Terrorism.Claudia Card - 2003 - Hypatia 18 (1):164 - 169.
    : The concept of a war on terrorism creates havoc with attempts to apply rules of war. For "terrorism" is not an agent. Nor is it clear what relationship to terrorism agents must have in order to be legitimate targets. Nor is it clear what kinds of terrorism count. Would a war on terrorism in the home be a justifiable response to domestic battering? If not, do similar objections apply to a war on public terrorism?
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  18. Facing Our Humanity.Drucilla Cornell - 2003 - Hypatia 18 (1):170 - 174.
    : This article argues that U.S. aggression against Afghanistan must be challenged through our support of the Revolutionary Association of the Women of Afghanistan (RAWA) and their political program. It does so not only by considering competing judgments about what constitutes women's rights, but also through an appeal to the Kantian ideal of humanity and its relation to how we can re-think both terrorism and the treatment of those accused of terrorist activity.
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  19. Responding to the Evil of Terrorism.Alison M. Jaggar - 2003 - Hypatia 18 (1):175 - 182.
    In this paper, I distinguish terrorism from other crimes and from war, noting that terrorism may be perpetrated not only by private individuals and members of nonstate organizations, but also that it may be ordered by the state. Since terrorism is illegal almost everywhere, I argue that the proper response to it is usually through law enforcement rather than military measures. In some circumstances, however, I content that even law enforcement procedures may be used by the state to terrorize civilians. (...)
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  20. The Subject of Violence: Arendtean Exercises in Understanding.Margaret A. McLaren - 2003 - Hypatia 18 (2):205-208.
  21. Terrorism, Evil, and Everyday Depravity.Bat-ami Bar On - 2003 - Hypatia 18 (1):157-163.
    This essay expresses ambivalence about the use of the term "evil" in analyses of terrorism in light of the association of the two in speeches intended to justify the United States' "war on terrorism." At the same time, the essay suggests that terrorism can be regarded as "evil" but only when considered among a multiplicity of "evils" comparable to it, for example: rape, war crimes, and repression.
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  22. The Moral Horror of the September Attacks.Sara Ruddick - 2003 - Hypatia 18 (1):212 - 222.
    : I try to identify the distinct moral horror occasioned by the attacks of September 11 in order to accord them an appropriate, limited place in the ongoing history of terror and violence. I consider the agents of evil and the victims as evil constructs them. I conclude with victim stories that reveal evil by showing the goodness it violates, making us feel the bitter loss of what violence has killed, kills, and will kill again.
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  23. Terrorists, Hostages, Victims, and "the Crisis Team": A "Who's Who" Puzzle.Nancy Potter - 1999 - Hypatia 14 (3):126-156.
    : This essay examines the relationship between nonviolence and trustworthiness. I focus on questions of accountability for people in midlevel positions of power, where multiple loyalties and responsibilities create conflicts and where policies can push people into actions that reinstate hegemonic relations. A case study from crisis counseling is presented in which the (mis)management of the case exacerbated previous violence done to a biracial female. The importance of resistance to dominant ideology is scrutinized.
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  24. Terrorists, Hostages, Victims, and "The Crisis Team": A "Who's Who" Puzzle.Nancy Potter - 1999 - Hypatia 14 (3):126-156.
    This essay examines the relationship between nonviolence and trustworthiness. I focus on questions of accountability for people in midlevel positions of power, where multiple loyalties and responsibilities create conflicts and where policies can push people into actions that reinstate hegemonic relations. A case study from crisis counseling is presented in which the management of the case exacerbated previous violence done to a biracial female. The importance of resistance to dominant ideology is scrutinized.
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  25. "Krieg". VII. Symposium der IAPH. 20.-23. September 1995 in Wien.Isabel Wenzler-stöckel - 1996 - Die Philosophin 7 (13):122-126.
  26. An Alternative to Pacifism? Feminism and Just-War Theory.Lucinda J. Peach - 1994 - Hypatia 9 (2):152-172.
    Only rarely have feminist theorists addressed the adequacy of just -war theory, a set of principles developed over hundreds of years to assess the justice of going to war and the morality of conduct in war. Recently, a few feminist scholars have found just -war theory inadequate, yet their own counterproposals are also deficient. I assess feminist contributions to just -war theorizing and suggest ways of strengthening, rather than abandoning, this moral approach to war.
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