About this topic
Summary

Feminist philosophical work focused on non-human animals considers the status of non-human animals themselves as well as the moral, epistemological, metaphysical, and phenomenological dimensions of human/non-human animal relationships.  Theoretical work in this area often focuses on the intersections of gender, race, class, and species, noticing the ways in which the exploitation of non-humans is linked to the exploitation of marginalized humans.  There is considerable overlap between feminist work on non-human animals and ecofeminism, though not all ecofeminism has been inclusive of non-human animals.

Key works  One of the earlier works connecting feminism and animals is Adams 2000.  Other key works in this area include volumes edited by Adams and Donovan including Animals and Women and The Feminist Care Tradition in Animal Ethics as well as Greta Gaard's volume entitled Ecofeminism: Women, Animals, Nature.  There is  a rich literature on feminism and non-human animals, some journal articles of note include, Gruen 2011, Gruen et al 2012, Gaard 2001, Mckenna 1994, Kheel 1985, and Slicer 1991.
Introductions Gruen 2011
Related categories

75 found
Order:
1 — 50 / 75
  1. Fathoming Postnatural Oceans: Towards a Low Trophic Theory in the Practices of Feminist Posthumanities.Marietta Radomska & Cecilia Åsberg - 2021 - Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space 4:1-18.
    As the planet’s largest ecosystem, oceans stabilise climate, produce oxygen, store CO2 and host unfathomable biodiversity at a deep time-scale. In recent decades, scientific assessments have indicated that the oceans are seriously degraded to the detriment of most near-future societies. Human-induced impacts range from climate change, ocean acidification, loss of biodiversity, eutrophication and marine pollution to local degradation of marine and coastal environments. Such environmental violence takes form of both ‘spectacular’ events, like oil spills and ‘slow violence’, occurring gradually and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. Community Care: The Ethics of Care in a Residential Community.Marian Barnes - 2020 - Ethics and Social Welfare 14 (2):140-155.
  3. Deterritorialising Death: Queerfeminist Biophilosophy and Ecologies of the Non/Living in Contemporary Art.Marietta Radomska - 2020 - Australian Feminist Studies 35 (104).
    In the contemporary context of environmental crises and the degradation of resources, certain habitats become unliveable, leading to the death of individuals and species extinction. Whilst bioscience emphasises interdependency and relationality as crucial characteristics of life shared by all organisms, Western cultural imaginaries tend to draw a thick dividing line between humans and nonhumans, particularly evident in the context of death. On the one hand, death appears as a process common to all forms of life; on the other, as an (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  4. Viral Queerings, Amplified Vulnerabilities.Marietta Radomska - 2020 - In Jussi Koitela & Yvonne Billimor (eds.), Rehearsing Hospitalities Companion 2. Berlin: pp. 155-172.
    From Editors' Introduction: "With our invitation to turn over (re-turn) hospitality in these times Marietta Radomska’s response combines her own research within the emerging field of Queer Death Studies6 with a detailed reading of the coronavirus disease pandemic. In her essay, “Viral queerings, amplified vulnerabilities”, Marietta seeks to subvert normative and simplified understandings of our present. Following the thread that the pandemic affects some bodies more than others, Marietta highlights how “the exploitation and degradation of nature mixed with intensifying socio-economic (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. On Laruelle and the Radical Dyad: Katerina Kolozova's Materialist Non-Humanism.Ekin Erkan - 2019 - Cultural Logic: A Journal of Marxist Theory and Practice 23:72-82.
    As one of the seminal theorists further developing François Laruelle’s politically-poised “non-standard philosophy,” Katerina Kolozova’s approach to animality and feminism is part of a particular post-humanist Marxist continuum (which includes Rosi Braidotti, Luce Irigaray, Donna Haraway and N. Katherine Hayles). Nonetheless, Kolozova distinguishes herself from this lineage by adhering to Laruelle’s method, liquidating philosophy of its anthropomorphic nexus. Thus, Kolozova also belongs to a more recently inaugurated and nascent tradition, working in tandem with post-Laruellean philosophers of media, technology, aesthetics and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. Queer Death Studies: Coming to Terms with Death, Dying and Mourning Differently. An Introduction.Marietta Radomska, Tara Mehrabi & Nina Lykke - 2019 - Women, Gender and Research 2019 (3-4):3-11.
    Queer Death Studies (QDS) refers to an emerging transdisciplinary field of research that critically and (self) reflexively investigates and challenges conventional normativities, assumptions, expectations, and regimes of truths that are brought to life and made evident by death, dying, and mourning. Since its establishment as a research field in the 1970s, Death Studies has drawn attention to the questions of death, dying, and mourning as complex and multifaceted phenomena that require inter- or multi-disciplinary approaches and perspectives. Yet, the engagements with (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. What an [En]Tangled Web We Weave: Emotions, Motivation, and Rethinking Us and the “Other”.Myisha Cherry - 2017 - Hypatia 32 (2):439-451.
    In Entangled Empathy, Lori Gruen offers an alternative ethic for our relationships with animals. In this article, I examine Gruen's account of entangled empathy by first focusing on entangled empathy's relation to the moral emotions of sympathy, compassion, and other emotions. I then challenge Gruen's account of how entangled empathy moves us to attend to others. Lastly, and without intending to place humans at the center of the conversation, I reflect on the ways entangled empathy can help us solve some (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. Understanding Others in an Alienating World: Comments on Lori Gruen's Entangled Empathy.Remy Debes - 2017 - Hypatia 32 (2):428-438.
    Is moral theory alienating? This question, and the worries that lie behind it, motivate much of Lori Gruen's distinctive approach to animal ethics in Entangled Empathy. According to Gruen, the “traditional” methods of moral theory rely on abstractions that strip away the details that give our lives meaning. Although I am deeply sympathetic to these worries, as well as to the alternative ethics Gruen proposes in response to them, in this article I express a few reservations about the argument Gruen (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. From Cyborgs to Companion Species: Affinity and Solidarity in Donna Haraway’s Feminist Theory.Tomohiro Inokuchi - 2017 - In Applied Ethics: The Past, Present and Future of Applied Ethics. pp. 50-58.
    The purpose of this paper is to clarify the transition and its meaning of the central figure used by Donna J. Haraway. Along with her achievement in primatology and gender, her prior manifesto about cyborgs, in which she utilized the image of hybrids from science fiction as a tool for analyzing actual women, has received significant attention and has made her an essential researcher in feminist science studies. On the other hand, her recent concern has led her to publish another (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. Witnessing Animal Others: Bearing Witness, Grief, and the Political Function of Emotion.Kathryn Gillespie - 2016 - Hypatia 31 (3):572-588.
    This article theorizes the politics of witnessing and grief in the context of the embodied experience of cows raised for dairy in the Pacific Northwestern United States. Bearing witness to the mundane features of dairy production and their impact on cows' physical and emotional worlds enables us to understand the violence of commodification and the political dimensions of witnessing the suffering of an Other. I argue that greater attention should be paid to the uneven hierarchies of power in the act (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  11. Missing Links and Non/Human Queerings: An Introduction.Line Henriksen & Marietta Radomska - 2015 - Somatechnics 5 (2):113-119.
    In recent years, questions regarding the ontological status of the human have been raised with renewed interest and imagination within various fields of critical thought. In the face of biotechnological findings and increasingly advanced technologies that connect as well as disturb settled boundaries, whether geographical or bodily, not to mention philosophical questionings of traditional western humanism, the boundaries of the human subject have been contested. The human body, traditionally imagined as closed and autonomous, has been opened up to a world (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. MacCormack, Patricia (Ed.), The Animal Catalyst: Towards Ahuman Theory, Bloomsbury, London and New York, 2014. ISBN: 9781472534446 (Paperback) / 9781472526847 (Cloth), 224 Pp., US$ 34.95 (Paperback) / US$ 104 (Cloth). [REVIEW]Marietta Radomska - 2015 - Somatechnics 5:255-258.
    The ‘Animal Question’ has occupied Western philosophy for more than a decade now. Whether inspired by the rising urgency of the problem of violence towards and exploitation of nonhuman animals perpetuated by science, technology and culture broadly speaking, or by an enthralment with otherness, an increasing number of theorists engage with the concepts of the animal and human–nonhuman relations. These notions become an incessant impetus for creative and critical inquiry and the exploration of philosophical, political, ethical and artistic thinking. What, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. Analysing Animality: A Critical Approach.Jason Wyckoff - 2015 - Philosophical Quarterly 65 (260):529-546.
    Most people seem to believe that it is wrong to cause needless suffering and death to non-human animals, and yet most people also contribute to the needless suffering and death of a great many animals. If speciesism is understood as a psychological prejudice—the tendency of an individual human agent to disregard the interests of animals—then this fact is extremely difficult to explain. I argue that once speciesism is understood structurally—as a matter of injustice rather than a matter of interpersonal wrongdoing (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  14. Science Studies Perspectives on Animal Behavior Research: Toward a Deeper Understanding of Gendered Impacts.J. Kasi Jackson - 2014 - Hypatia 29 (4):738-754.
    This case study examines differences between how the animal-behavior-research fields of ethology and sociobiology account for female ornamental traits. I address three questions: 1) Why were female traits noted in early animal-behavior writings but not systematically studied like male traits? 2) Why did ethology attend to female signals before sexual-selection studies did? 3) And why didn't sexual-selection researchers cite the earlier ethological literature when they began studying female traits? To answer these questions, I turn to feminist and other science-studies scholars (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. Linking Sexism and Speciesism.Jason Wyckoff - 2014 - Hypatia 29 (4):721-737.
    Some feminists and animal advocates defend what I call the Linked Oppressions Thesis, according to which the oppression of women and the oppression of animals are linked causally, materially, normatively, and/or conceptually. Alasdair Cochrane offers objections to several versions of the Linked Oppressions Thesis and concludes that the Thesis should be rejected in all its forms. In this paper I defend the Thesis against Cochrane's objections as well as objections leveled by Beth Dixon, and argue that the failure of these (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  16. Joan B. Landes;, Paula Young Lee;, Paul Youngquist . Gorgeous Beasts: Animal Bodies in Historical Perspective. Xiii + 231 Pp., Illus., Bibl., Index. University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 2012. $49.95. [REVIEW]Paul Lawrence Farber - 2013 - Isis 104 (2):385-385.
  17. Thou Shall Not Harm All Living Beings: Feminism, Jainism, and Animals.Irina Aristarkhova - 2012 - Hypatia 27 (3):636-650.
    In this paper, I critically develop the Jain concept of nonharm as a feminist philosophical concept that calls for a change in our relation to living beings, specifically to animals. I build on the work of Josephine Donovan, Carol J. Adams, Jacques Derrida, Kelly Oliver, and Lori Gruen to argue for a change from an ethic of care and dialogue to an ethic of carefulness and nonpossession. I expand these discussions by considering the Jain philosophy of nonharm in relation to (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. Loving Animals: Toward a New Animal Advocacy. By Kathy Rudy. Minneapolis and London: University of Minnesota Press, 2011. [REVIEW]Frances Bartkowski - 2012 - Hypatia 27 (3):675-678.
  19. “The Animal” and “The Feminist”.Emily Clark - 2012 - Hypatia 27 (2).
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20. Toward a Postcolonial, Posthumanist Feminist Theory: Centralizing Race and Culture in Feminist Work on Nonhuman Animals.Maneesha Deckha - 2012 - Hypatia 27 (3):527-545.
    Posthumanist feminist theory has been instrumental in demonstrating the salience of gender and sexism in structuring human–animal relationships and in revealing the connections between the oppression of women and of nonhuman animals. Despite the richness of feminist posthumanist theorizations it has been suggested that their influence in contemporary animal ethics has been muted. This marginalization of feminist work—here, in its posthumanist version—is a systemic issue within theory and needs to be remedied. At the same time, the limits of posthumanist feminist (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  21. The Face of Suffering.Daniel A. Dombrowski - 2012 - Journal of Animal Ethics 2 (2):205-211.
  22. Sister Species: Women, Animals, and Social Justice. Edited by Lisa Kemmerer. Urbana, Chicago, and Springfield: University of Illinois Press, 2011. [REVIEW]Karen S. Emmerman - 2012 - Hypatia 27 (3):670-672.
  23. Speaking of Animal Bodies.Greta Gaard - 2012 - Hypatia 27 (2):n/a-n/a.
  24. Marti Kheel Remembered (1948–2011).Lori Gruen - 2012 - Hypatia 27 (3):488-491.
  25. Animal Others—Editors' Introduction.Lori Gruen & Kari Weil - 2012 - Hypatia 27 (3):477-487.
  26. Introduction: Feminists Encountering Animals.Lori Gruen & Kari Weil - 2012 - Hypatia 27 (2):492-526.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27. Invited Symposium: Feminists Encountering Animals.Lori Gruen, Kari Weil, Kelly Oliver, Traci Warkentin, Stephanie Jenkins, Carrie Rohman, Emily Clark & Greta Gaard - 2012 - Hypatia 27 (3):492 - 526.
  28. Introduction.Lori Gruen, Kari Weil, Kelly Oliver, Traci Warkentin, Stephanie Jenkins, Carrie Rohman, Emily Clark & Greta Gaard - 2012 - Hypatia 27 (3):492-526.
  29. The Parallel Lives of Women and Cows: Meat Markets.Jean O'Malley Halley - 2012 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
    Weaving together a social history of the American beef industry withher ownaccount of growing up in the shadow of her grandfather’s cattle business, Halley juxtaposes the two worlds and creates a link between the meat industry and her own experience of the formation of gender and sexuality through family violence.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  30. Returning the Ethical and Political to Animal Studies.Stephanie Jenkins - 2012 - Hypatia 27 (2):n/a-n/a.
  31. Intimate Bureaucracies: Roadkill, Policy, and Fieldwork on the Shoulder.Alexandra Koelle - 2012 - Hypatia 27 (3):651-669.
    Over the last twenty years, wildlife biologists and transportation planners have worked with environmental groups and state and tribal governments to mitigate the effects of human transportation arteries on animal habitats and movements. This paper draws connections between this growing field of road ecology and feminist science studies in order to accomplish two things. First, it aims to highlight the often unacknowledged roots that the interdisciplinary field of animal studies has in feminist theory. Second, it seeks to contribute to conversations (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  32. Ambivalence Toward Animals and the Moral Community.Kelly Oliver - 2012 - Hypatia 27 (2):n/a-n/a.
  33. Disciplinary Becomings: Horizons of Knowledge in Animal Studies.Carrie Rohman - 2012 - Hypatia 27 (2):n/a-n/a.
  34. Species Trouble: Judith Butler, Mourning, and the Precarious Lives of Animals.James Stanescu - 2012 - Hypatia 27 (3):567-582.
    This article utilizes the work of Judith Butler in order to chart a queer and feminist animal studies, an animal studies that celebrates our shared embodied finitude. Butler's commentary on other animals remains dispersed and fragmented throughout books, lectures, and interviews over the course of the last several years. This work is critically synthesized in conjunction with her work on mourning and precarious lives. By developing an anti-anthropocentric understanding of mourning and precarious lives, this article hopes to create ontological, ethical, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  35. Animal Lessons: How They Teach Us to Be Human. By Kelly Oliver. New York: Columbia University Press, 2009.Chloë Taylor - 2012 - Hypatia 27 (3):672-675.
  36. Must Every Animal Studies Scholar Be Vegan?Traci Warkentin - 2012 - Hypatia 27 (2):n/a-n/a.
  37. Sister Species: Women, Animals and Social Justice.Carol J. Adams - 2011 - University of Illinois Press.
    Sister Species: Women, Animals, and Social Justice addresses interconnections between speciesism, sexism, racism, and homophobia, clarifying why social justice activists in the twenty-first century must challenge intersecting forms of oppression. This anthology presents bold and gripping--sometimes horrifying--personal narratives from fourteen activists who have personally explored links of oppression between humans and animals, including such exploitative enterprises as cockfighting, factory farming, vivisection, and the bushmeat trade. Sister Species asks readers to rethink how they view "others," how they affect animals with their (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38. Ethics and Animals: An Introduction.Lori Gruen - 2011 - Cambridge University Press.
    In this comprehensive introduction to animal ethics, Lori Gruen weaves together poignant and provocative case studies with discussions of ethical theory, urging readers to engage critically and empathetically reflect on our treatment of other animals. In clear and accessible language, Gruen provides a survey of the issues central to human-animal relations and a reasoned new perspective on current key debates in the field. She analyses and explains a range of theoretical positions and poses challenging questions that directly encourage readers to (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   31 citations  
  39. Spinoza and the Politics of Renaturalization.Hasana Sharp - 2011 - University of Chicago Press.
    Reconfiguring the human -- Lines, planes, and bodies: redefining human action -- Action as affect -- The transindividuality of affect -- The tongue -- Renaturalizing ideology: Spinoza's ecosystem of ideas -- The matrix -- Ideology critique today? -- The fly in the coach -- "I am in ideology," or the attribute of thought -- What is to be done? -- Man's utility to man: reason and its place in nature -- The politics of human nature -- Reason and the human (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   31 citations  
  40. Animal Affects: Spinoza and the Frontiers of the Human.Hasana Sharp - 2011 - Journal for Critical Animal Studies 9 (1-2):48-68.
    Like any broad narrative about the history of ideas, this one involves a number of simplifications. My hope is that by taking a closer look Spinoza's notorious remarks on animals, we can understand better why it becomes especially urgent in this period as well as our own for philosophers to emphasize a distinction between human and nonhuman animals. In diagnosing the concerns that give rise to the desire to dismiss the independent purposes of animals, we may come to focus on (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  41. Noreen Giffney, Myra J. Hird (Eds.): Queering the Non/Human. [REVIEW]Marie Fox - 2009 - Feminist Legal Studies 17 (1):105-108.
  42. Animal Lessons: How They Teach Us to Be Human.Kelly Oliver - 2009 - Columbia University Press.
    Introduction: The role of animals in philosophies of man -- Part I: What's wrong with animal rights? -- The right to remain silent -- Part II: Animal pedagogy -- You are what you eat : Rousseau's cat -- Say the human responded : Herder's sheep -- Part III: Difference worthy of its name -- Hair of the dog : Derrida's and Rousseau's good taste -- Sexual difference, animal difference : Derrida's sexy silkworm -- Part IV: It's our fault -- The (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   26 citations  
  43. Sexual Difference, Animal Difference: Derrida and Difference “Worthy of Its Name”.Kelly Oliver - 2009 - Hypatia 24 (2):54-76.
    I challenge the age-old binary opposition between human and animal, not as philosophers sometimes do by claiming that humans are also animals, or that animals are capable of suffering or intelligence, but rather by questioning the very category of “the animal” itself. This category groups a nearly infinite variety of living beings into one concept measured in terms of humans—animals are those creatures that are not human. In addition, I argue that the binary opposition between human and animal is intimately (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  44. Considering Animals: Kheel's Nature Ethics and Animal Debates in Ecofeminism. Sturgeon - 2009 - Ethics and the Environment 14 (2):pp. 153-162.
  45. How Ecological Should Epistemology Be?Richmond Campbell - 2008 - Hypatia 23 (1):161-169.
  46. Feminism and the Treatment of Animals : From Care to Dialogue.Josephine Donovan - 2008 - In Susan J. Armstrong & Richard George Botzler (eds.), The Animal Ethics Reader. Routledge.
  47. We Are What We Eat: Feminist Vegetarianism and the Reproduction of Racial Identity.Cathryn Bailey - 2007 - Hypatia 22 (2):39-59.
    : In this article, Bailey analyzes the relationship between ethical vegetarianism (or the claim that ethical vegetarianism is morally right for all people) and white racism (the claim that white solipsistic and possibly white privileged ethical claims are imperialistically or insensitively universalized over less privileged human lives). This plays out in the dreaded comparison of animals with people of color and Jews as exemplified in the PETA campaign and the need for human identification (or solidarity) with animals in ethical vegetarianism. (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  48. The Feminist Care Tradition in Animal Ethics: A Reader.Josephine Donovan & Carol J. Adams (eds.) - 2007 - Cambridge University Press.
    In _Beyond Animal Rights_, Josephine Donovan and Carol J. Adams introduced feminist "ethic of care" theory into philosophical discussions of the treatment of animals. In this new volume, seven essays from _Beyond Animal Rights_ are joined by nine new articles-most of which were written in response to that book-and a new introduction that situates feminist animal care theory within feminist theory and the larger debate over animal rights. Contributors critique theorists' reliance on natural rights doctrine and utilitarianism, which, they suggest, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   40 citations  
  49. Wild, Women, and Wolves: An Ecological Feminist Examination of Wolf Introduction.Colette R. Palamar - 2007 - Environmental Ethics 29 (1):63-75.
    Despite the successes, and the considerable and continuing ethical disputes regarding wolf reintroduction in the United States, no clear, cogent, theoretically based ethical examination of the wolf reintroductions has yet been completed. Ecological feminist thought, particularly as articulated by Karen J. Warren, presents one way to create such an ethical assessment. Applying ecological feminist theories to wolf reintroduction also generates an intriguing instance of theoretical application in the “real world” and sheds insight on the pragmatic value of ecological feminist thought. (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50. A Defense of the Feminist-Vegetarian Connection.Sheri Lucas - 2005 - Hypatia 20 (1):150-177.
    : Kathryn Paxton George's recent publication, Animal, Vegetable, or Woman? (2000), is the culmination of more than a decade's work and encompasses standard and original arguments against the feminist-vegetarian connection. This paper demonstrates that George's key arguments are deeply flawed, antithetical to basic feminist commitments, and beg the question against fundamental aspects of the debate. Those who do not accept the feminist-vegetarian connection should rethink their position or offer a non-question-begging defense of it.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
1 — 50 / 75