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Catherine Osborne [57]Catherine R. Osborne [2]
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Catherine Joanna Rowett
University of East Anglia
  1. Successors of Socrates, Disciples of Descartes, and Followers of Freud. [REVIEW]Catherine Osborne - 2001 - Apeiron 34 (2):181 - 193.
    All three books reviewed here are turning over again for us the pages of perennially irresistible thinkers whose ideas never cease to hold us transfixed; all three are inviting us to notice that the material that we thought we knew has got more to do with what Nehamas calls 'the art of living' than we might have realised; and all three are making space for attitudes, responses and areas of self-understanding that are, by traditional classifications, irrational and hence sometimes inadequately (...)
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  2.  56
    Dumb Beasts and Dead Philosophers: Humanity and the Humane in Ancient Philosophy and Literature.Catherine Osborne - 2007 - Oxford University Press.
    The book is about three things. First, how Ancient thinkers perceived humans as like or unlike other animals; second about the justification for taking a humane attitude towards natural things; and third about how moral claims count as true, and how they can be discovered or acquired. Was Aristotle was right to see continuity in the psychological functions of animal and human souls? The question cannot be settled without taking a moral stance. As we can either focus on continuity or (...)
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  3.  28
    Space, Time, Shape, and Direction: Creative Discourse in the Timaeus.Catherine Osborne - 1996 - In Christopher Gill & Mary Margaret McCabe (eds.), Form and Argument in Late Plato. Oxford University Press. pp. 179--211.
    There is an analogy between Timaeus's act of describing a world in words and the demiurge's task of making a world of matter. This analogy implies a parallel between language as a system of reproducing ideas in words, and the world, which reproduces reality in particular things. Authority lies in the creation of a likeness in words of the eternal Forms. The Forms serve as paradigms both for the physical world created by the demiurge, and for the world in discourse (...)
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  4. Eros Unveiled: Plato and the God of Love.Catherine Osborne - 1994 - Oxford University Press.
    This unique book challenges the traditional distinction between eros, the love found in Greek thought, and agape, the love characteristic of Christianity. Focusing on a number of classic texts, including Plato's Symposium and Lysis, Aristotle's Ethics and Metaphysics,, and famous passages in Gregory of Nyssa, Origen, Dionysius the Areopagite, Plotinus, Augustine, and Thomas Aquinas, the author shows that Plato's account of eros is not founded on self-interest. In this way, she restores the place of erotic love as a Christian motif, (...)
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  5.  37
    Empedocles Recycled.Catherine Osborne - 1987 - Classical Quarterly 37 (01):24-.
    It is no longer generally believed that Empedocles was the divided character portrayed by nineteenth-century scholars, a man whose scientific and religious views were incompatible but untouched by each other. Yet it is still widely held that, however unitary his thought, nevertheless he still wrote more than one poem, and that his poems can be clearly divided between those which do, and those which do not, concern ‘religious matters’.1 Once this assumption can be shown to be shaky or actually false, (...)
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  6.  60
    Perceiving White and Sweet (Again) : Aristotle, De Anima 3.7, 431a20-B1.Catherine Osborne - 1998 - Classical Quarterly 48 (2):433-446.
    In chapter 7 of the third book of De anima Aristotle is concerned with the activity of the intellect, which, here as elsewhere in the work, he explores by developing parallels with his account of sense-perception. In this chapter his principal interest appears to be the notion of judgement, and in particular intellectual judgements about the value of some item on a scale of good and bad. In this paper I shall argue, firstly that there is in fact a coherent (...)
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  7.  32
    Presocratic Philosophy: A Very Short Introduction.Catherine Osborne - 2004 - Oxford University Press.
    This is a book about the invention of Western philosophy, and the first thinkers to explore ideas about the nature of reality, time, and the origin of the universe. Generations of philosophers, both ancient and modern, have traced their inspiration back to the presocratics, even though we have very few of their writings left. In this book, Catherine Osborne invites her readers to dip their toes into the fragmentary remains of thinkers from Thales to Pythagoras, Heraclitus to Protagoras, to try (...)
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  8.  78
    Perceiving Particulars and Recollecting the Forms in the 'Phaedo'.Catherine Osborne - 1994 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 95:211 - 233.
    I ask whether the Recollection argument commits Socrates to the view that our only source of knowledge of the Forms is sense perception. I argue that Socrates does not confine our presently available sources of knowledge to empirically based recollection, but that he does think that we can't begin to move towards a philosophical understanding of the Forms except as a result of puzzles prompted by the shortfall of particulars in relation to the Forms, and hence that our awareness of (...)
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  9.  42
    XI—Perceiving Particulars and Recollecting the Forms in thePhaedo.Catherine Osborne - 1995 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 95 (1):211-234.
    I ask whether the Recollection argument commits Socrates to the view that our only source of knowledge of the Forms is sense perception. I argue that Socrates does not confine our presently available sources of knowledge to empirically based recollection, but that he does think that we can't begin to move towards a philosophical understanding of the Forms except as a result of puzzles prompted by the shortfall of particulars in relation to the Forms, and hence that our awareness of (...)
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  10. Rethinking Early Greek Philosophy.Catherine Osborne - 1989 - Peeters Press.
    An analysis of Hippolytus' Refutation of All Heresies, to discover his practices and motivations in preserving and quoting extracts from Greek Philosophy, in particular his important contribution to our knowledge of Presocratic Philosophy. The work argues that such sources must be read as embedded texts, and that fragments must not be extracted and treated in isolation from the quoting authority whose interests and knowledge are important in interpreting the material.
     
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  11. Aristotle, De Anima 3. 2: How Do We Perceive That We See and Hear?Catherine Osborne - 1983 - Classical Quarterly 33 (02):401-411.
    The most important things in this seminal paper are (a) showing that the first part of the chapter is only setting up the aporia and does not provide the solution; (b) showing that the rest of the chapter provides the material for resolving the aporia; (c) showing that the question is not about how we perceive that we perceive, but how we can distinguish between seeing and hearing—how we are aware that we are seeing rather than hearing; (c) showing that (...)
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  12. Socrates in the Platonic Dialogues.Catherine Osborne - 2006 - Philosophical Investigations 29 (1):1–21.
    If Socrates is portrayed holding one view in one of Plato's dialogues and a different view in another, should we be puzzled? If (as I suggest) Plato's Socrates is neither the historical Socrates, nor a device for delivering Platonic doctrine, but a tool for the dialectical investigation of a philosophical problem, then we should expect a new Socrates, with relevant commitments, to be devised for each setting. Such a dialectical device – the tailor-made Socrates – fits with what we know (...)
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  13. Happy Lives and the Highest Good: An Essay on Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics – Gabriel Richardson Lear. [REVIEW]Catherine Osborne - 2007 - Philosophical Investigations 30 (1):92–96.
  14.  22
    Love's Bitter Fruits: Martha C. Nussbaum The Therapy of Desire: Theory and Practice in Hellenistic Ethics. [REVIEW]Catherine Osborne - 1996 - Philosophical Investigations 19 (4):318-328.
    I explore the connections between love, resentment and anger, and challenge Nussbaum's assumption that love is self-seeking, leads to resentment when the benefits are withdrawn, and that anger is invariably a vicious response. I sketch an alternative view of genuine love, and of the importance of the anger that springs from seeing a loved one unjustly treated.
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  15.  43
    Indices Chrysostomici, II: De Sacerdotio. [REVIEW]Catherine Osborne - 1990 - The Classical Review 40 (2):482-483.
  16.  42
    Selves and Other Selves in Aristotle’s Eudemian Ethics Vii 12.Catherine Osborne - 2009 - Ancient Philosophy 29 (2):349-371.
    Osborne argues against the idea that Aristotle thinks that friends are useful for assisting us towards self-knowledge, and defends instead the idea that friends provide an extension of the self which enables one to obtain a richer view of the shared world that we view together. She then examines similar questions about why the good person would gain from encountering fictional characters in literature, and what kinds of literature would be beneficial to the good life.
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  17.  28
    Rethinking Early Greek Philosophy: Hippolytus of Rome and the Presocratics.Catherine Osborne - 1987 - Cornell University Press.
    A study of Hippolytus of Rome and his treatment of Presocratic Philosophy, used as a case study to argue against the use of collections of fragments and in favour of the idea of reading "embedded texts" with attention to the interpretation and interests of the quoting author. A study of methodology in early Greek Philosophy. Includes novel interpretations of Heraclitus and Empedocles, and an argument for the unity of Empedocles's poem.
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  18. Sexual Ethics: The Meaning and Foundations of Sexual Morality – Aurel Kolnai. [REVIEW]Catherine Osborne - 2008 - Philosophical Quarterly 58 (231):377–379.
  19.  32
    Metaphysics, Soul, and Ethics in Ancient Thought: Themes From the Work of Richard Sorabji. [REVIEW]Catherine Osborne - 2007 - The Classical Review 57 (2):332-336.
  20.  31
    Tertullien: Contre Marcion Tome II . Texte Critique, Traduction Et Notes. [REVIEW]Catherine Osborne - 1994 - The Classical Review 44 (1):212-213.
  21.  29
    Firmus de Césarée: Lettres. Introduction, Texte Et Traduction, Notes Et Index. [REVIEW]Catherine Osborne - 1990 - The Classical Review 40 (2):483-484.
  22.  33
    David Furley. Cosmic Problems: Essays on Greek and Roman Philosophy of Nature. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1989. Pp. Xiv + 258. ISBN 0-521-33330-X. [REVIEW]Catherine Osborne - 1990 - British Journal for the History of Science 23 (3):367-368.
  23.  10
    Rethinking Early Greek Philosophy: Hippolytus of Rome and the Presocratics.David Furley & Catherine Osborne - 1991 - Philosophical Review 100 (1):157.
  24.  35
    Was Verse the Default Form for Presocratic Philosophy?Catherine Osborne - 1998 - In Catherine Atherton (ed.), Form and Content in Didactic Poetry.
    I argue that philosophy was naturally conceived and written in verse, not prose, in the early years of philosophy, and that prose writing would be the exception not the norm. I argue that philosophers developed their ideas in verse and did not repackage ideas and thoughts first formulated in non-poetic genres, so there is no adaptation or modification involved in "putting it into poetry". This also means that the content and the form are interdependent, and the poetic details are part (...)
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  25.  32
    G. S. Kirk, J. E. Raven, M. Schofield, The Presocratic Philosophers. 2nd Edition. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1983. Pp. Xiii and 501. ISBN 0-521-25444-2 £30.00. [REVIEW]Catherine Osborne - 1985 - British Journal for the History of Science 18 (1):93-94.
    This is a review of the book by Kirk, Raven and Schofield.
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  26.  18
    Archimedes on the Dimensions of the Cosmos.Catherine Osborne - 1983 - Isis 74 (2):234-242.
  27.  19
    George Klosko, "The Development of Plato's Political Theory". [REVIEW]Catherine Osborne - 1989 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 27 (1):146.
  28.  44
    Ralph Cudworth's The True Intellectual System of the Universe and the Presocratic Philosophers.Catherine Osborne - 2011 - In Oliver Primavesi & Katharina Luchner (eds.), The Presocratics from the Latin Middle Ages to Hermann Diels. Steiner Verlag.
    Ralph Cudworth (1617-88) was one of the Cambridge Platonists. His major work, The True Intellectual System of the Universe, was completed in 1671, a year after Spinoza published (anonymously) the Tractatus Logico-philosophicus. It was published a few years later, in 1678. Cudworth offers a spirited attack against the materialism and mechanism of Thomas Hobbes. His work is couched as a search for truth among the ancient philosophers, and this paper examines his use of the Presocratics as a tool for discussing (...)
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  29.  25
    Aristotle on ΦΙΛΙΑ. [REVIEW]Catherine Osborne - 1996 - Classical Review 46 (1):73-75.
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  30.  22
    Philoponus on the Origins of the Universe and Other Issues.Catherine Osborne - 1989 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 20 (3):389-395.
  31. Aristotle on the Fantastic Abilities of Animals in De Anima 3. 3'.Catherine Osborne - 2000 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 19:253-85.
    A discussion of De anima 3.3 designed to show that phantasia serves to prevent a dualism of different objects for perception and thought, and ensures that attention is directed to real objects in the world, for both animals and humans. when they perceive and when they think about things in their absence. There is a continuity between animal and human behaviour, based on the common use of perceptual attention as the basis of mental attention. The objects of thought are not (...)
     
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  32.  17
    Matter, Space, and Motion: Theories in Antiquity and Their Sequel. Richard Sorabji. [REVIEW]Catherine Osborne - 1990 - Isis 81 (1):97-98.
  33.  24
    "No" Means "Yes": The Seduction of the Word in Plato's Phaedrus.Catherine Osborne - 1999 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 15 (1):263-281.
    The motifs of love and seduction in the Phaedrus are not about sexual love but about philosophy, and particularly about two different approaches to philosophy, one engaged and emotionally, even poetically, involved and one cold, rational and detached. Socrates' palinode speech in the Phaedrus contrasts the lover of beauty whose philosophical sensitivities enable the wings to grow and intellectual vision to occur, with the cool rational character of the non-lover who has no place for love of beauty and cares only (...)
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  34.  33
    Scott Austin: Parmenides, Being, Bounds and Logic. [REVIEW]Catherine Osborne - 1991 - Ancient Philosophy 11 (2):393-396.
    This is a book review of the work by Scott Austin.
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  35.  31
    “If All Things Were to Turn to Smoke, It’D Be the Nostrils Would Tell Them Apart”.Catherine Osborne - 2009 - In Enrique Hülsz Piccone (ed.), Nuevos Ensayos Sobre Heráclito: Actas Del Segundo Symposium Heracliteum.
    I start by asking what Aristotle knew (or thought) about Heraclitus: what were the key features of Heraclitus's philosophy as far as Aristotle was concerned? In this section of the paper I suggest that there are some patterns to Aristotle's references to Heraclitus: besides the classic doctrines (flux, ekpyrosis and the unity of opposites) on the one hand, and the opening of Heraclitus's book on the other, Aristotle knows and reports a few slightly less obvious sayings, one of which is (...)
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  36.  34
    Three Studies on Anaximander D. L. Couprie, R. Hahn, G. Naddaf: Anaximander in Context. New Studies in the Origins of Greek Philosophy . Pp. XIV + 290, Maps, Ills. Albany: State University of New York Press, 2003. Paper, Us$27.95 (Cased, Us$81.50). Isbn: 0-7914-5538-6 (0-7914-5537-8 Hbk). [REVIEW]Catherine Osborne - 2004 - The Classical Review 54 (02):288-.
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  37.  21
    Zenon d'Elee: Prolegomenes aux Doctrines du Continu. [REVIEW]Catherine Osborne & M. Caveing - 1986 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 106:226.
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  38.  21
    The Cosmic Republic: Notes for a Non-Peripatetic History of the Birth of Philosophy in Greece. [REVIEW]Catherine Osborne - 1995 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 115:205-205.
    Some reasons not to bother to read the book being reviewed.
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  39.  21
    God and Greek Philosophy: Studies in the Early History of Natural TheologyPlatonic Piety: Philosophy and Ritual in Fourth-Century Athens. [REVIEW]Catherine Osborne, L. P. Gerson & M. L. Morgan - 1994 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 114:192-194.
  40.  24
    Migrant Domestic Careworkers: Between the Public and the Private in Catholic Social Teaching.Catherine R. Osborne - 2012 - Journal of Religious Ethics 40 (1):1-25.
    This essay argues that Catholic (magisterial) social teaching's division of ethics into public and private creates a structural lacuna which makes it almost impossible to envision a truly just situation for migrant domestic careworkers (MDCs) within the current horizon of Catholic social thought. Drawing on a variety of sociological studies, I conclude that it is easy for MDCs to “disappear” between two countries, two families, and, finally, two sets of ethical norms. If the magisterium genuinely wishes Catholic ethicists to address (...)
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  41.  30
    Holding the Centre and Untied Kingdom – by Ian Robinson. [REVIEW]Catherine Osborne - 2010 - Philosophical Investigations 33 (3):266-270.
  42.  26
    Companionable Aristotle J. Barnes (Ed.): The Cambridge Companion to Aristotle . Pp. Xxv + 404. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1995. ISBN: 0-521-41133-5 (0-521-42292-9 Pbk). [REVIEW]Catherine Osborne - 1999 - The Classical Review 49 (01):115-.
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  43.  10
    The Greek Cosmologists. Volume I: The Formation of the Atomic Theory and Its Earliest Critics. David Furley. [REVIEW]Catherine Osborne - 1988 - Isis 79 (3):536-537.
  44. Rethinking Early Greek Philosophy: Hippolytus of Rome and the Presocratics.Catherine Osborne - 1988 - Phronesis 33 (3):327-344.
     
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  45. Topography in the Timaeus: Plato and Augustine on Mankind's Place in the Natural World.Catherine Osborne - 1988 - Proceedings of the Cambridge Philological Society 34:104-111.
    I consider the relation between the shape or structure of the world and the moral position occupied by human beings, and show that a cosmology that places earth at the centre does not give the centre of the universe pride of place but the lowest place, so any reluctance to move the earth from the centre of the universe was not due to thinking that humans must be in the most important position. From Plato on, the surface of the earth (...)
     
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  46.  14
    Justin Martyr: Apologies. [REVIEW]Catherine Osborne - 1989 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 109:271-272.
  47.  11
    The Greek Cosmologists. Volume I: The Formation of the Atomic Theory and Its Earliest Critics by David Furley. [REVIEW]Catherine Osborne - 1988 - Isis 79:536-537.
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  48.  11
    The Presocratic Philosophers. [REVIEW]Catherine Osborne - 1985 - British Journal for the History of Science 18 (1):93-94.
  49.  7
    Anarchy in Our Churches? The American Architectural Press, 1944–65.Catherine R. Osborne - 2017 - The European Legacy 22 (3):278-292.
    In the mid-twentieth century American architectural journals, including Architectural Forum, Architectural Record, and Progressive Architecture, routinely ran features on the state of contemporary church architecture in the United States. Rapid suburban expansion and the revival of religious life in the post-Depression, postwar era generated tremendous amounts of construction, with a great deal of work available for architects. This article examines the concerns and hopes of modernist editors in the 1940s–1960s, as they sought to stabilize a “direction” for church architecture. Specifically, (...)
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  50. André Laks, Le vide et la haine: éléments pour une histoire archaïque de la négativité; Introduction à la “philosophie présocratique”. [REVIEW]Catherine Osborne - 2008 - Rhizai. A Journal for Ancient Philosophy and Science:339-344.
    Review of André Laks, Le vide et la haine: éléments pour une histoire archaïque de la négativité, Presses Universitaires de France, Paris, 2004 ; Introduction à la “philosophie présocratique”, Presses Universitaires de France, Paris, 2006.
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