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    Critical Thinking, Bias and Feminist Philosophy: Building a Better Framework Through Collaboration.Adam Dalgleish, Patrick Girard & Maree Davies - 2017 - Informal Logic 38 (2):351-369.
    In the late 20th century theorists within the radical feminist tradition such as Haraway highlighted the impossibility of separating knowledge from knowers, grounding firmly the idea that embodied bias can and does make its way into argument. Along a similar vein, Moulton exposed a gendered theme within critical thinking that casts the feminine as toxic ‘unreason’ and the ideal knower as distinctly masculine; framing critical thinking as a method of masculine knowers fighting off feminine ‘unreason’. Theorists such as Burrow have (...)
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    Critical Thinking, Bias and Feminist Philosophy: Building a Better Framework Through Collaboration.Adam Dalgleish, Patrick Girard & Maree Davies - 2018 - Informal Logic 38 (1):351-369.
    In the late 20th century theorists within the radical feminist tradition such as Haraway highlighted the impossibility of separating knowledge from knowers, grounding firmly the idea that embodied bias can and does make its way into argument. Along a similar vein, Moulton exposed a gendered theme within critical thinking that casts the feminine as toxic ‘unreason’ and the ideal knower as distinctly masculine; framing critical thinking as a method of masculine knowers fighting off feminine ‘unreason’. Theorists such as Burrow have (...)
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    Critical Thinking, Bias and Feminist Philosophy: Building a Better Framework Through Collaboration.Adam Dalgleish, Patrick Girard & Maree Davies - 2017 - Informal Logic 37 (4):351-369.
    In the late 20th century theorists within the radical feminist tradition such as Haraway highlighted the impossibility of separating knowledge from knowers, grounding firmly the idea that embodied bias can and does make its way into argument. Along a similar vein, Moulton exposed a gendered theme within critical thinking that casts the feminine as toxic ‘unreason’ and the ideal knower as distinctly masculine; framing critical thinking as a method of masculine knowers fighting off feminine ‘unreason’. Theorists such as Burrow have (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
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