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  1. Matthew C. Altman (2007). The Decomposition of the Corporate Body: What Kant Cannot Contribute to Business Ethics. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 74 (3):253 - 266.
    Kant is gaining popularity in business ethics because the categorical imperative rules out actions such as deceptive advertising and exploitative working conditions, both of which treat people merely as means to an end. However, those who apply Kant in this way often hold businesses themselves morally accountable, and this conception of collective responsibility contradicts the kind of moral agency that underlies Kant's ethics. A business has neither inclinations nor the capacity to reason, so it lacks the conditions necessary for constraint (...)
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  2. Heike Baranzke (2005). Tierethik, Tiernatur und Moralanthropologie im Kontext von § 17, Tugendlehre. Kant-Studien 96 (3):336-363.
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  3. Allan Beever (2013). Kant on the Law of Marriage. Kantian Review 18 (3):339-362.
    The account of marriage Kant presents in the Rechtslehre strikes most readers as cold, legalistic and obsessed with sex. It seems to ignore at least nearly all of the morally valuable aspects of marriage. Consequently, most have felt that this is a feature of Kant's theory best ignored. Against this view, this article argues that Kant's focus is appropriate, that his understanding of marriage is much more romantic than is commonly thought and that it presents a thought-provoking alternative to the (...)
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  4. Elizabeth Brake (2005). Justice and Virtue in Kant's Account of Marriage. Kantian Review 9 (1):58-94.
    All duties are either duties of right (officia iuris), that is, duties for which external lawgiving is possible, or duties of virtue (officia virtutis s. ethica), for which external lawgiving is not possible. – Duties of virtue cannot be subject to external lawgiving simply because they have to do with an end which (or the having of which) is also a duty. No external lawgiving can bring about someone's setting an end for himself (because this is an internal act of (...)
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  5. I. Brassington (2006). Killing People: What Kant Could Have Said About Suicide and Euthanasia but Did Not. Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (10):571-574.
    An agent who takes his own life acts in violation of the moral law, according to Kant; suicide, and, by extension, assisted suicide are therefore wrong. By a similar argument, and with a few important exceptions, killing is wrong; implicitly, then, voluntary euthanasia is also wrong. Kant's conclusions are uncompelling and his argument in these matters is undermined on considering other areas of his thought. Kant, in forbidding suicide and euthanasia, is conflating respect for persons and respect for people, and (...)
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  6. Alexander Broadie & Elizabeth M. Pybus (1974). Kant's Treatment of Animals. Philosophy 49 (190):375 - 383.
  7. C. Brown (2008). Kant and Therapeutic Privilege. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 33 (4):321-336.
  8. Gregory Lewis Bynum (2011). Kant's Conception of Respect and African American Education Rights. Educational Theory 61 (1):17-40.
    Immanuel Kant envisioned a kind of respect in which one recognizes each human (1) as being not fully comprehensible by any human understanding, (2) as being an end in him- or herself, and (3) as being a potential source of moral law. In this essay, Gregory Lewis Bynum uses this conception of respect as a lens with which to examine African American education rights on three levels: the individual level (the level of individual persons' moral experience and moral significance), the (...)
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  9. J. S. Callender (1998). Ethics and Aims in Psychotherapy: A Contribution From Kant. Journal of Medical Ethics 24 (4):274-278.
    Psychotherapy is an activity which takes many forms and which has many aims. The present paper argues that it can be viewed as a form of moral suasion. Kant's concepts of free will and ethics are described and these are then applied to the processes and outcome of psychotherapy. It is argued that his ideas, by linking rationality, free will and ethics into a single philosophical system, offer a valuable theoretical framework for thinking about aims and ethical issues in psychotherapy.
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  10. Ruth F. Chadwick (1989). The Market for Bodily Parts: Kant and Duties to Oneself. Journal of Applied Philosophy 6 (2):129-140.
    The demand for bodily parts such as organs is increasing, and individuals in certain circumstances are responding by offering parts of their bodies for sale. Is there anything wrong in this? Kant had arguments to suggest that there is, namely that we have duties towards our own bodies, among which is the duty not to sell parts of them. Kant's reasons for holding this view are examined, and found to depend on a notion of what is intrinsically degrading. Rom Harré's (...)
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  11. H. J. de Vleeschauwer (1966). La Doctrine du Suicide Dans l'Ethique de Kant. Kant-Studien 57 (1-4):251-265.
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  12. Richard Dean (2006). The Value of Humanity in Kant's Moral Theory. Oxford University Press.
    The humanity formulation of Kant's Categorical Imperative demands that we treat humanity as an end in itself. Because this principle resonates with currently influential ideals of human rights and dignity, contemporary readers often find it compelling, even if the rest of Kant's moral philosophy leaves them cold. Moreover, some prominent specialists in Kant's ethics have recently turned to the humanity formulation as the most theoretically central and promising principle of Kant's ethics. Nevertheless, it has received less attention than many other (...)
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  13. Lara Denis (2008). Animality and Agency: A Kantian Approach to Abortion. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 76 (1):117–137.
    This paper situates abortion in the context of women’s duties to themselves. I argue that the fundamental Kantian requirement to respect oneself as a rational being, combined with Kanrs view of our animal nature, form the basis for a view of pregnancy and abortion that focuses on women’s agency and characters without diminishing the importance of their bodies and emotions. The Kantian view of abortion that emerges takes abortion to be morally problematic, but sometimes permissible, and sometimes even required.After (...)
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  14. Lara Denis (2007). Abortion and Kant's Formula of Universal Law. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 37 (4):547-579.
  15. Lara Denis (2007). Abortion and Kant's Formula of Universal Law. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 37 (4):547-580.
    The formula of universal law (FUL) is a natural starting point for philosophers interested in a Kantian perspective on the morality of abortion. I argue, however, that FUL does not yield much in the way of promising or substantive conclusions regarding the morality of abortion. I first reveal how two philosophers' (Hare's and Gensler's) attempts to use Kantian considerations of universality and prescriptivity fail to provide analyses of abortion that are either compelling or true to Kant=s understanding of FUL. I (...)
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  16. Lara Denis (2006). Sex and the Virtuous Kantian Agent. In Raja Halwani (ed.), Sex and Ethics: Essays in Sexuality, Virtue, and the Good Life. Palgrave Macmillan.
    This paper explores how a virtuous Kantian agent would regard and express her sexuality. I argue both that Kant has a rich account of virtue, and that a virtuous Kantian agent should view her sexuality as a good thing–as an important aspect of her animal nature. On my view, the virtuous agent does not seek to suppress her sexuality, but rather to find modes and contexts for its expression that allow the agent to maintain her self-respect and to avoid degrading (...)
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  17. Lara Denis (2003). Review: Louden, Kant's Impure Ethics. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 66 (2):491-493.
  18. Lara Denis (2001). From Friendship to Marriage: Revising Kant. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 63 (1):1-28.
  19. Lara Denis (2000). Kant's Conception of Duties Regarding Animals: Reconstruction and Reconsideration. History of Philosophy Quarterly 17 (4):405-23.
    In Kant’s moral theory, we do not have duties to animals, though we have duties with regard to them. I reconstruct Kant’s arguments for several types of duties with regard to animals and show that Kant’s theory imposes far more robust requirements on our treatment of animals than one would expect. Kant’s duties regarding animals are perfect and imperfect; they are primarily but not exclusively duties to oneself; and they condemn not merely cruelty to animals for its own sake, but (...)
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  20. Dan Egonsson (1997). Kant's Vegetarianism. Journal of Value Inquiry 31 (4):473-483.
  21. Rolf George (2009). Langton on Duty and Desolation. Kantian Review 14 (1):123-128.
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  22. Nicole Gerrand (1999). The Misuse of Kant in the Debate About a Market for Human Body Parts. Journal of Applied Philosophy 16 (1):59–67.
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  23. Martin Gunderson (2007). Seeking Perfection: A Kantian Look at Human Genetic Engineering. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 28 (2):87-102.
    It is tempting to argue that Kantian moral philosophy justifies prohibiting both human germ-line genetic engineering and non-therapeutic genetic engineering because they fail to respect human dignity. There are, however, good reasons for resisting this temptation. In fact, Kant’s moral philosophy provides reasons that support genetic engineering—even germ-line and non-therapeutic. This is true of Kant’s imperfect duties to seek one’s own perfection and the happiness of others. It is also true of the categorical imperative. Kant’s moral philosophy does, however, provide (...)
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  24. Thomas D. Harter (2011). Reconsidering Kant on Suicide. Philosophical Forum 42 (2):167-185.
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  25. Jeroen G. J. Hasselaar (2008). Palliative Sedation Until Death: An Approach From Kant's Ethics of Virtue. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 29 (6):387-396.
    This paper is concerned with the moral justification for palliative sedation until death. Palliative sedation involves the intentional lowering of consciousness for the relief of untreatable symptoms. The paper focuses on the moral problems surrounding the intentional lowering of consciousness until death itself, rather than possible adjacent life-shortening effects. Starting from a Kantian perspective on virtue, it is shown that continuous deep sedation until death (CDS) does not conflict with the perfect duty of moral self-preservation because CDS does not destroy (...)
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  26. C. D. Herrera (1996). Applying Kant's Ethics to Deceptive Psychological Experiments. Southwest Philosophy Review 12 (1):257-269.
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  27. Thomas Hill (2009). Kant and Humanitarian Intervention. Philosophical Perspectives 23 (1):221-240.
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  28. Thomas E. Hill (1997). A Kantian Perspective on Political Violence. Journal of Ethics 1 (2):105 - 140.
    Rejecting Kant''s absolute opposition to revolution, I propose a modified Kantian perspective for reflecting on political violence, drawing from Kant''s basic ideas but abandoning some dubious assumptions. Developing suggestions in earlier papers, the essay sketches a model for moral legislation that combines the core ideas of each of Kant''s formulas of the Categorical Imperative. Though only a framework for deliberation, not a complete decision procedure, this excludes extremist positions, prohibitive and permissive, about political violence. Despite Kant''s hopes, the values implicit (...)
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  29. Heimo E. M. Hofmeister (1972). The Ethical Problem of the Lie in Kant. Kant-Studien 63 (1-4):353-368.
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  30. Sarah Williams Holtman (2004). Kantian Justice and Poverty Relief. Kant-Studien 95 (1):86-106.
  31. Sarah Williams Holtman (1999). Kant, Ideal Theory, and the Justice of Exclusionary Zoning. Ethics 110 (1):32-58.
  32. J. Ives (2007). Kant, Curves and Medical Learning Practice: A Reply to Le Morvan and Stock. Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (2):119-122.
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  33. David N. James (1992). Twenty Questions: Kant's Applied Ethics. Southern Journal of Philosophy 30 (3):67-87.
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  34. Soo Bae Kim (2009). The Formation of Kant's Casuistry and Method Problems of Applied Ethics. Kant-Studien 100 (3):332-345.
    This paper examines the methodological problem of casuistry by reference to Immanuel Kant's position on it. He addressed “Casuistical Questions” in his last work on ethics, Metaphysik der Sitten , in order to defend his position against attacks from scholars defending an Aristotelian (and also Ciceronian) eudemonistic viewpoint. It is argued that Kantian casuistry has much in common with the Aristotelian idea of emphasizing the moral objectives and sensibility of an agent in concrete circumstances. Nevertheless, Kant did not entirely adopt (...)
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  35. Christine M. Korsgaard, Fellow Creatures: Kantian Ethics and Our Duties to Animals.
    Christine M. Korsgaard is Arthur Kingsley Porter Professor of Philosophy at Harvard University. She was educated at the University of Illinois and received a Ph.D. from Harvard. She has held positions at Yale, the University of California at Santa Barbara, and the University of Chicago, and visiting positions at Berkeley and UCLA. She is a member of the American Philosophical Association and a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. She has published extensively on Kant, and about moral (...)
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  36. Christine M. Korsgaard, Interacting with Animals: A Kantian Account.
    1. Being an Animal Human beings are animals: phylum: chordata, class: mammalia, order: primates, family: hominids, species: homo sapiens, subspecies: homo sapiens sapiens. According to current scientific opinion, we evolved approximately 200,000 years ago in Africa from ancestors whom we share with the other great apes. What does it mean that we are animals? Scientifically speaking, an animal is essentially a complex, multicellular organism that feeds on other life forms. But what we share with the other animals is not just (...)
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  37. Jacquie L'Etang (1992). A Kantian Approach to Codes of Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 11 (10):737 - 744.
    The paper discusses whether codes of ethics are Kantian notions through an analysis of their intention and structure. The article also discusses some of the ideas put forward by William Starr in his article, Codes of Ethics — Towards a Rule-Utilitarian Justification,Journal of Business Ethics 2(2) (May 1983).The paper refers to recent definitions of codes of ethics and considers reasons for the proliferation of such codes. It examines the moral justification for these codes and analyses the underlying ethical theory particularly (...)
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  38. Stephen R. Latham (2007). Kant Condemned All Suicide. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (6):49-51.
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  39. Sylvie Loriaux (2007). Kant on International Distributive Justice. Journal of Global Ethics 3 (3):281 – 301.
    This paper concentrates on the way Kant's distinction between duties of right and duties of virtue operates at the interstate level. I argue that his Right of Nations (V ölkerrecht) can be interpreted as a duty to establish a kind of interstate distributive justice (that is, as a duty to secure states in their independence and territorial possessions), which is called for to secure domestic distributive justice and to protect individuals' freedom and private property. Or at least this is 'ideal (...)
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  40. James Edwin Mahon (2009). The Truth About Kant on Lies. In Clancy W. Martin (ed.), The Philosophy of Deception. Oxford University Press.
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  41. Bertha Manninen (2008). Are Human Embryos Kantian Persons?: Kantian Considerations in Favor of Embryonic Stem Cell Research. Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 3 (1):4.
    One argument used by detractors of human embryonic stem cell research (hESCR) invokes Kant's formula of humanity, which proscribes treating persons solely as a means to an end, rather than as ends in themselves. According to Fuat S. Oduncu, for example, adhering to this imperative entails that human embryos should not be disaggregated to obtain pluripotent stem cells for hESCR. Given that human embryos are Kantian persons from the time of their conception, killing them to obtain their cells for research (...)
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  42. Sue Martinelli-Fernandez (2002). Kant, Lies, and Business Ethics. Teaching Ethics 2 (2):41-52.
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  43. Lawrence Masek (2005). How Kant's View of Perfect and Imperfect Duties Resolves an Alleged Moral Dilemma for Judges. Ratio Juris 18 (4):415-428.
    I clarify Kant's classification of duties and criticize the apocryphal tradition that, according to Kant, perfect duties trump imperfect duties. I then use Kant's view to argue that judges who believe that an action is immoral and should be illegal need not set aside their beliefs in order to comply with binding precedents that permit the action. The same view of morality that causes some people to oppose certain actions, including abortion, requires lower–court judges to comply with binding precedents. Therefore, (...)
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  44. Kurt Mosser (1999). Kant and Feminism. Kant-Studien 90 (3):322-353.
  45. Steven Olson (2011). Too Bad for Kant : Lessons of Experience with the Three Questions Foundational to Teaching Business Ethics. In Ronald R. Sims & William I. Sauser (eds.), Experiences in Teaching Business Ethics. Information Age Pub..
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  46. Stuart Oultram (2010). Does the Baby Selling Objection to Commercial Surrogacy Misuse Immanuel Kant? In Matti Häyry (ed.), Arguments and Analysis in Bioethics. Rodopi.
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  47. Stephen Palmquist, Kant, Sexism and the Ethics of Polygamy.
  48. Stephen Palmquist & Adriano Palomo, Kant, Buddhism, and the Moral Metaphysics of Medicine.
    "This paper examines Kant's moral theory and compares it with certain key aspects of oriental (especially Buddhist) moral philosophy. In both cases, we focus on the suggestion that there may be a connection between a person's physical health and moral state. Special attention is paid to the nature of pain, illness, and personal happiness and to their mutual interrelationships. A frequently ignored feature of Kant's approach to morality is his preoccupation with health, and his attempt to interpret it in terms (...)
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  49. Lina Papadaki (2010). Kantian Marriage and Beyond: Why It Is Worth Thinking About Kant on Marriage. Hypatia 25 (2):276 - 294.
    Kant has famously argued that monogamous marriage is the only relationship where sexual use can take place "without degrading humanity and breaking the moral laws." Kantian marriage, however, has been the target of fierce criticisms by contemporary things: it has been regarded as flawed and paradoncal, as being deeply at odds with feminism, and, at best, as plainly uninteresting. In this paper, I argue that Kantian marriage can indeed survive these criticisms. Finally, the paper advances the discussion beyond marriage. Drawing (...)
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  50. H. J. Paton (1954). An Alleged Right to Lie. A Problem in Kantian Ethics. Kant-Studien 45 (1-4):190-203.
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