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  1. Matthew C. Altman (2007). The Decomposition of the Corporate Body: What Kant Cannot Contribute to Business Ethics. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 74 (3):253 - 266.
    Kant is gaining popularity in business ethics because the categorical imperative rules out actions such as deceptive advertising and exploitative working conditions, both of which treat people merely as means to an end. However, those who apply Kant in this way often hold businesses themselves morally accountable, and this conception of collective responsibility contradicts the kind of moral agency that underlies Kant's ethics. A business has neither inclinations nor the capacity to reason, so it lacks the conditions necessary for constraint (...)
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  2. Sharon Anderson-Gold (2008). The Purposiveness of Nature: Kant and Environmental Ethics. In Valerio Hrsg V. Rohden, Ricardo Terra & Guido Almeida (eds.), Recht Und Frieden in der Philosophie Kants. 3--12.
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  3. Mikhail Antonov (2007). Unser schwerer Weg zum Recht - Grundprobleme der modernen theoretischen Rechtswissenschaft in Rubland. Rechtstheorie 38 (1):157-168.
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  4. Ruben G. Apressyan (2009). On the Right to Lie. Russian Studies in Philosophy 48 (3):9-25.
    The author questions the validity of Kant's insistence on the absoluteness of the requirement "Do not lie" as well as the very possibility of absolute moral principles in general. He argues for applied ethics, the object of which would be individual-situational behavior and the rules and requirements of which have a concrete situational character. He points out that Kant's insistence on the absoluteness contradicts the humanity imperative, especially its requirement to treat others as an end in itself. He stresses that (...)
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  5. Stefano Bacin (2015). Kant’s Idea of Human Dignity: Between Tradition and Originality. Kant-Studien 106 (1):97-106.
    Name der Zeitschrift: Kant-Studien Jahrgang: 106 Heft: 1 Seiten: 97-106.
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  6. Stefano Bacin (2002). Sul rapporto tra riflessione e vita morale in Kant: le dottrine del metodo nella filosofia pratica. Studi Kantiani 15.
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  7. Heike Baranzke (2005). Tierethik, Tiernatur und Moralanthropologie im Kontext von § 17, Tugendlehre. Kant-Studien 96 (3):336-363.
    Vor mehr als 150 Jahren formulierte Arthur Schopenhauer in seiner Preisschrift über die Grundlage der Moral Kritikpunkte an Äußerungen Kants zum moralischen Verhältnis des Menschen zu den Tieren, die seither zu den tierethischen Standardvorwürfen an die Adresse der Kantischen Ethik gehören und ihr völlige tierethische Leistungsunfähigkeit attestieren. Schopenhauer sieht jede „ächte Moral“ durch den Satz beleidigt, daß die vernunftlosen Wesen Sachen wären und daher auch bloß als Mittel, die nicht zugleich Zweck sind, behandelt werden dürften. In Uebereinstimmung hiemit wird, in (...)
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  8. Marcia Baron (2009). Kantian Moral Maturity and the Cultivation of Character. In Harvey Siegel (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Education. Oxford University Press 227.
  9. Allan Beever (2013). Kant on the Law of Marriage. Kantian Review 18 (3):339-362.
    The account of marriage Kant presents in the Rechtslehre strikes most readers as cold, legalistic and obsessed with sex. It seems to ignore at least nearly all of the morally valuable aspects of marriage. Consequently, most have felt that this is a feature of Kant's theory best ignored. Against this view, this article argues that Kant's focus is appropriate, that his understanding of marriage is much more romantic than is commonly thought and that it presents a thought-provoking alternative to the (...)
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  10. Elizabeth Brake (2005). Justice and Virtue in Kant's Account of Marriage. Kantian Review 9 (1):58-94.
    All duties are either duties of right (officia iuris), that is, duties for which external lawgiving is possible, or duties of virtue (officia virtutis s. ethica), for which external lawgiving is not possible. – Duties of virtue cannot be subject to external lawgiving simply because they have to do with an end which (or the having of which) is also a duty. No external lawgiving can bring about someone's setting an end for himself (because this is an internal act of (...)
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  11. I. Brassington (2006). Killing People: What Kant Could Have Said About Suicide and Euthanasia but Did Not. Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (10):571-574.
    An agent who takes his own life acts in violation of the moral law, according to Kant; suicide, and, by extension, assisted suicide are therefore wrong. By a similar argument, and with a few important exceptions, killing is wrong; implicitly, then, voluntary euthanasia is also wrong. Kant's conclusions are uncompelling and his argument in these matters is undermined on considering other areas of his thought. Kant, in forbidding suicide and euthanasia, is conflating respect for persons and respect for people, and (...)
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  12. Angela Breitenbach (2009). Umweltethik nach Kant. Ein analogisches Verständnis vom Wert der Natur. Deutsche Zeitschrift für Philosophie 57 (3):377-395.
    Kant is often characterised as the chief exponent of an anthropocentric ethics that can ascribe to nature only a purely instrumental value. By contrast, this paper argues that Kant′s teleological conception of nature provides the basis for a promising account of environmental ethics. According to this account we can attribute to nature a value that is independent of its usefulness to human beings without making this value independent from the judgment of the rational valuer.
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  13. Alexander Broadie & Elizabeth M. Pybus (1974). Kant's Treatment of Animals. Philosophy 49 (190):375 - 383.
  14. C. Brown (2008). Kant and Therapeutic Privilege. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 33 (4):321-336.
    Given Kant's exceptionless moral prohibition on lying, one might suspect that he is committed to a similar prohibition on withholding diagnostic and prognostic information from patients. I confirm this suspicion by adapting arguments against therapeutic privilege from his arguments against lying. However, I show that all these arguments are importantly flawed and submit that they should be rejected. A more compelling Kantian take on informed consent and therapeutic privilege is achievable, I argue, by focusing on Kant's duty of beneficence, which (...)
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  15. Gregory Lewis Bynum (2011). Kant's Conception of Respect and African American Education Rights. Educational Theory 61 (1):17-40.
    Immanuel Kant envisioned a kind of respect in which one recognizes each human (1) as being not fully comprehensible by any human understanding, (2) as being an end in him- or herself, and (3) as being a potential source of moral law. In this essay, Gregory Lewis Bynum uses this conception of respect as a lens with which to examine African American education rights on three levels: the individual level (the level of individual persons' moral experience and moral significance), the (...)
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  16. J. S. Callender (1998). Ethics and Aims in Psychotherapy: A Contribution From Kant. Journal of Medical Ethics 24 (4):274-278.
    Psychotherapy is an activity which takes many forms and which has many aims. The present paper argues that it can be viewed as a form of moral suasion. Kant's concepts of free will and ethics are described and these are then applied to the processes and outcome of psychotherapy. It is argued that his ideas, by linking rationality, free will and ethics into a single philosophical system, offer a valuable theoretical framework for thinking about aims and ethical issues in psychotherapy.
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  17. Ruth F. Chadwick (1989). The Market for Bodily Parts: Kant and Duties to Oneself. Journal of Applied Philosophy 6 (2):129-140.
    The demand for bodily parts such as organs is increasing, and individuals in certain circumstances are responding by offering parts of their bodies for sale. Is there anything wrong in this? Kant had arguments to suggest that there is, namely that we have duties towards our own bodies, among which is the duty not to sell parts of them. Kant's reasons for holding this view are examined, and found to depend on a notion of what is intrinsically degrading. Rom Harré's (...)
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  18. H. J. de Vleeschauwer (1966). La Doctrine du Suicide Dans l'Ethique de Kant. Kant-Studien 57 (1-4):251-265.
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  19. Richard Dean (2006). The Value of Humanity in Kant's Moral Theory. Oxford University Press.
    The humanity formulation of Kant's Categorical Imperative demands that we treat humanity as an end in itself. Because this principle resonates with currently influential ideals of human rights and dignity, contemporary readers often find it compelling, even if the rest of Kant's moral philosophy leaves them cold. Moreover, some prominent specialists in Kant's ethics have recently turned to the humanity formulation as the most theoretically central and promising principle of Kant's ethics. Nevertheless, it has received less attention than many other (...)
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  20. Lara Denis (2008). Animality and Agency: A Kantian Approach to Abortion. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 76 (1):117-37.
    This paper situates abortion in the context of women’s duties to themselves. I argue that Kant’s fundamental moral requirement (found in the formula of humanity) to respect oneself as a rational being, combined with Kant’s view of our animal nature, form the basis for a view of pregnancy and abortion that focuses on women’s agency and moral character without diminishing the importance of their bodies and emotions. The Kantian view of abortion that emerges takes abortion to be morally problematic, but (...)
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  21. Lara Denis (2007). Abortion and Kant's Formula of Universal Law. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 37 (4):547-579.
  22. Lara Denis (2007). Abortion and Kant's Formula of Universal Law. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 37 (4):547-580.
    The formula of universal law (FUL) is a natural starting point for philosophers interested in a Kantian perspective on the morality of abortion. I argue, however, that FUL does not yield much in the way of promising or substantive conclusions regarding the morality of abortion. I first reveal how two philosophers' (Hare's and Gensler's) attempts to use Kantian considerations of universality and prescriptivity fail to provide analyses of abortion that are either compelling or true to Kant=s understanding of FUL. I (...)
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  23. Lara Denis (2006). Sex and the Virtuous Kantian Agent. In Raja Halwani (ed.), Sex and Ethics: Essays in Sexuality, Virtue, and the Good Life. Palgrave Macmillan
    This paper explores how a virtuous Kantian agent would regard and express her sexuality. I argue both that Kant has a rich account of virtue, and that a virtuous Kantian agent should view her sexuality as a good thing–as an important aspect of her animal nature. On my view, the virtuous agent does not seek to suppress her sexuality, but rather to find modes and contexts for its expression that allow the agent to maintain her self-respect and to avoid degrading (...)
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  24. Lara Denis (2003). Review: Louden, Kant's Impure Ethics. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 66 (2):491-493.
  25. Lara Denis (2001). From Friendship to Marriage: Revising Kant. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 63 (1):1-28.
    This paper examines Kant’s accounts of friendship and marriage, and argues for what can be called an ideal of “moral marriage” based on Kant’s notion of moral friendship. After explaining why Kant values friendship so highly, it gives an account of the ways in which marriage falls far short, according to Kant, of what friendship has to offer. The paper then argues that many of Kant’s reasons for finding marriage morally impoverished compared with friendship are wrong-headed. The paper further argues (...)
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  26. Lara Denis (2000). Kant's Conception of Duties Regarding Animals: Reconstruction and Reconsideration. History of Philosophy Quarterly 17 (4):405-23.
    In Kant’s moral theory, we do not have duties to animals, though we have duties with regard to them. I reconstruct Kant’s arguments for several types of duties with regard to animals and show that Kant’s theory imposes far more robust requirements on our treatment of animals than one would expect. Kant’s duties regarding animals are perfect and imperfect; they are primarily but not exclusively duties to oneself; and they condemn not merely cruelty to animals for its own sake, but (...)
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  27. Jeffrey Edwards (2008). Truthiness and Consequences in the Public Use of Reason. Veritas: Revista de Filosofia da PUCRS 53 (1):73-91.
    The paper argues that there is good reason to doubt that virtue-based approaches to the question of justice can adequately come to grips with sophistic uses of the political lie – especially when sophistic thinking is stretched to the point of thoroughgoing moral skepticism, or well beyond that to outright moral nihilism and its cynical uses. To counter such uses, I turn to Kant’s most influential discussion of lying, which is found in his 1797article entitled “Of a Supposed Right to (...)
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  28. Dan Egonsson (1997). Kant's Vegetarianism. Journal of Value Inquiry 31 (4):473-483.
  29. Rolf George (2009). Langton on Duty and Desolation. Kantian Review 14 (1):123-128.
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  30. Nicole Gerrand (1999). The Misuse of Kant in the Debate About a Market for Human Body Parts. Journal of Applied Philosophy 16 (1):59–67.
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  31. Martin Gunderson (2007). Seeking Perfection: A Kantian Look at Human Genetic Engineering. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 28 (2):87-102.
    It is tempting to argue that Kantian moral philosophy justifies prohibiting both human germ-line genetic engineering and non-therapeutic genetic engineering because they fail to respect human dignity. There are, however, good reasons for resisting this temptation. In fact, Kant’s moral philosophy provides reasons that support genetic engineering—even germ-line and non-therapeutic. This is true of Kant’s imperfect duties to seek one’s own perfection and the happiness of others. It is also true of the categorical imperative. Kant’s moral philosophy does, however, provide (...)
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  32. Thomas D. Harter (2011). Reconsidering Kant on Suicide. Philosophical Forum 42 (2):167-185.
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  33. Jeroen G. J. Hasselaar (2008). Palliative Sedation Until Death: An Approach From Kant's Ethics of Virtue. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 29 (6):387-396.
    This paper is concerned with the moral justification for palliative sedation until death. Palliative sedation involves the intentional lowering of consciousness for the relief of untreatable symptoms. The paper focuses on the moral problems surrounding the intentional lowering of consciousness until death itself, rather than possible adjacent life-shortening effects. Starting from a Kantian perspective on virtue, it is shown that continuous deep sedation until death (CDS) does not conflict with the perfect duty of moral self-preservation because CDS does not destroy (...)
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  34. C. D. Herrera (1996). Applying Kant's Ethics to Deceptive Psychological Experiments. Southwest Philosophy Review 12 (1):257-269.
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  35. Thomas E. Hill (2003). Treating Criminals as Ends in Themselves. Jahrbuch für Recht Und Ethik 11.
    Bezugnehmend auf Kants Moralphilosophie entwickelt dieser Beitrag eine These dazu, was mit der Forderung gemeint sein soll, Personen unter Beachtung ihrer Würde bzw. als "Zweck an sich selbst" zu behandeln. Es wird vorgeschlagen, die Implikationen von Kants "Menschheitsformel" als ein Bündel von mit einander verwandten Vorschriften zu interpretieren, die das moralische Nachdenken darüber, wie die Prinzipien unserer tagtäglichen Entscheidungen spezifiziert und interpretiert werden sollten, leiten und begrenzen können. Der Beitrag bearbeitet sodann die folgenden drei Fragestellungen: Was folgt aus dem Vorangehenden (...)
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  36. Thomas E. Hill (1997). A Kantian Perspective on Political Violence. Journal of Ethics 1 (2):105 - 140.
    Rejecting Kant''s absolute opposition to revolution, I propose a modified Kantian perspective for reflecting on political violence, drawing from Kant''s basic ideas but abandoning some dubious assumptions. Developing suggestions in earlier papers, the essay sketches a model for moral legislation that combines the core ideas of each of Kant''s formulas of the Categorical Imperative. Though only a framework for deliberation, not a complete decision procedure, this excludes extremist positions, prohibitive and permissive, about political violence. Despite Kant''s hopes, the values implicit (...)
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  37. Thomas E. Hill (1997). Kant On Punishment: A Coherent Mix Of Deterrence And Retribution? Jahrbuch für Recht Und Ethik 5.
    Kant is often regarded as an extreme retributivist, but recently commentators emphasize the importance of deterrence in Kant's basic justification of punishment. Kant's combination of deterrence and retributive elements, however, must be distinguished from others that are less plausible. To interpret Kant as merely adding retributive side-constraints to a basic deterrence aim fails to capture fully the retributive strain in Kant's thought. The basic questions are: who should be punished, how much, in what manner, and why? Kant held that all (...)
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  38. Thomas E. Hill (1994). Kant On Responsibility For Consequences. Jahrbuch für Recht Und Ethik 2.
    In The Metaphysics of Morals Kant suggests that the bad results of wrongful acts can always be imputed to the agent but the bad results of dutiful acts can never be. Although Kant's concern in the context was apparently legal imputation, the article considers how Kant's doctrine might apply to questions about moral responsibility for bad consequences in cases where legal enforcement is inappropriate. First , interpretative questions are addressed. For example, does imputation imply being to blame for bad results (...)
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  39. Heimo E. M. Hofmeister (1972). The Ethical Problem of the Lie in Kant. Kant-Studien 63 (1-4):353-368.
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  40. Sarah Williams Holtman (2004). Kantian Justice and Poverty Relief. Kant-Studien 95 (1):86-106.
  41. Sarah Williams Holtman (1999). Kant, Ideal Theory, and the Justice of Exclusionary Zoning. Ethics 110 (1):32-58.
  42. Sarah Williams Holtman (1997). A Kantian Approach To Prison Reform. Jahrbuch für Recht Und Ethik 5.
    Despite the extreme violence and severe overcrowding that plague U.S. prisons, prison reform is nearly a non-issue in this country. Immanuel Kant's Metaphysics of Morals may first appear an unlikely place to seek support for a more critical view of prison conditions and popular attitudes toward them. But by appeal to the doctrines of right and virtue, we can discover substantial Kantian grounds to support reform efforts.On Kantian bases I thus develop two principles, the first a principle of justice and (...)
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  43. J. Ives (2007). Kant, Curves and Medical Learning Practice: A Reply to Le Morvan and Stock. Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (2):119-122.
    In a recent paper published in the Journal of Medical Ethics, Le Morvan and Stock claim that the kantian ideal of treating people always as ends in themselves and never merely as a means is in direct and insurmountable conflict with the current medical practice of allowing practitioners at the bottom of their “learning curve” to “practise their skills” on patients. In this response, I take up the challenge they issue is and try to reconcile this conflict. The kantian ideal (...)
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  44. David N. James (1992). Twenty Questions: Kant's Applied Ethics. Southern Journal of Philosophy 30 (3):67-87.
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  45. Tim Jankowiak (2014). Review of Patrick Frierson's Kant's Questions: What Is The Human Being. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2014.
  46. Samuel J. Kerstein (2013). How to Treat Persons. OUP Oxford.
    Samuel J. Kerstein develops a new, broadly Kantian account of the ethical issues that arise when a person treats another merely as a means. He explores how Kantian principles on the dignity of persons shed light on pressing issues in modern bioethics, including the distribution of scarce medical resources and the regulation of markets in organs.
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  47. Samuel J. Kerstein (2009). Kantian Condemnation of Commerce in Organs. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 19 (2):pp. 147-169.
  48. Soo Bae Kim (2009). The Formation of Kant's Casuistry and Method Problems of Applied Ethics. Kant-Studien 100 (3):332-345.
    This paper examines the methodological problem of casuistry by reference to Immanuel Kant's position on it. He addressed “Casuistical Questions” in his last work on ethics, Metaphysik der Sitten , in order to defend his position against attacks from scholars defending an Aristotelian (and also Ciceronian) eudemonistic viewpoint. It is argued that Kantian casuistry has much in common with the Aristotelian idea of emphasizing the moral objectives and sensibility of an agent in concrete circumstances. Nevertheless, Kant did not entirely adopt (...)
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  49. Christine M. Korsgaard, Fellow Creatures: Kantian Ethics and Our Duties to Animals.
    Christine M. Korsgaard is Arthur Kingsley Porter Professor of Philosophy at Harvard University. She was educated at the University of Illinois and received a Ph.D. from Harvard. She has held positions at Yale, the University of California at Santa Barbara, and the University of Chicago, and visiting positions at Berkeley and UCLA. She is a member of the American Philosophical Association and a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. She has published extensively on Kant, and about moral (...)
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  50. Christine M. Korsgaard, Interacting with Animals: A Kantian Account.
    1. Being an Animal Human beings are animals: phylum: chordata, class: mammalia, order: primates, family: hominids, species: homo sapiens, subspecies: homo sapiens sapiens. According to current scientific opinion, we evolved approximately 200,000 years ago in Africa from ancestors whom we share with the other great apes. What does it mean that we are animals? Scientifically speaking, an animal is essentially a complex, multicellular organism that feeds on other life forms. But what we share with the other animals is not just (...)
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