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  1. Liliana Acero (2009). Response: The Commodification of Women's Bodies in Trafficking for Prostitution and Egg Donation. International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 2 (1):25 - 32.
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  2. Gwen Adshead (2011). Same but Different: Constructions of Female Violence in Forensic Mental Health. International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 4 (1):41-68.
    We are more alike than we are different.In male prisons, the agency and antisocial mindset of violent offenders is taken seriously in the pursuit of rehabilitation. Male offenders are expected to own full agency for their cruelty and violence to others, and to explore it in supported rehabilitative group-work programs. Such programs have been shown to be highly effective for some offenders and relate to a process of engaging with a new pro-social identity and taking responsibility for leading a "good (...)
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  3. Anita LaFrance Allen (1997). Book Review: Joan Callahan. Reproduction, Ethics, and the Law. Bloomington, In: Indiana University Press, 1995 and Laura Purdy. Reproducing Persons: Issues in Feminist Bioethics. And Kathy Rudy. Beyond Pro-Life and Pro-Choice. [REVIEW] Hypatia 12 (4):202-211.
  4. Ben Almassi (2010). Disability, Functional Diversity, and Trans/Feminism. International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 3 (2):126-149.
    Feminist approaches to bioethics have the striking ability to usefully disrupt conversations otherwise in danger of calcifying into immovable opposing camps. Take, for instance, debates between theorists in disability studies and bioethicists who often take two different approaches to understanding disability. On one side are those such as Buchanan, Brock, Daniels, and Wikler (2000) who seek to locate the apparent functional deficiency of disability in biologically abnormal bodies. Let us call this a normal functioning approach to understanding disability. On the (...)
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  5. Rustem Ertug Altinay (2009). "This Child, Whose Bone Age Is Fourteen . . .": Ethical Dimensions of Skeletal Age Assessment. International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 2 (1):165 - 173.
    Forensic age estimation in living subjects is an important task for forensic experts, especially in countries where birth records are not well maintained. The process often is used to confirm the chronological age of a criminal or victim when there is a lack of available evidence, such as birth records and witnesses. Focusing on the case of Turkey where the Greulich and Pyle method is often the only method used in forensic estimation of age, this paper seeks to discuss the (...)
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  6. Judith Andre (2011). Feminist Bioethics. Biomedical Law and Ethics 4 (2).
    Overview of feminist bioethics for the journal of the Ewha Women's College, Seoul, South Korea.
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  7. Judith Andre (2006). Remember the Nurses. Apa Newsletter on Feminism and Philosophy 5 (2):19-21.
    As feminist theory explicates its fundamental principles – justice for the oppressed – it can lose its essential focus on the situation of women. One example is the inattention to nurses within feminist bioethics. Nurses deserve attention because most are women, but also because their lack of power is paradigmatic of patriarchy. Those examining ethics consultations should discuss whether nurses are allowed to request them. But feminists also need to imagine ways in which nurses can be heard when, for instance, (...)
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  8. Pat Armstrong (2013). Time, Race, Gender, and Care: Communicative and Strategic Action in Ancillary Care Commentary on Carol Levine's "Caring for Money". International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 6 (2):118-121.
    Monique Lanoix convincingly argues that what she calls ancillary work requires both communicative and strategic action. As she makes clear, in residential care communicative work is foundational both because strategic speech acts are not enough to fulfill the needs of either residents or care providers and because the space in which they live and work is a home; it is not a system but a lifeworld. As is the case with most interesting articles, this one prompts expansion and additional questions (...)
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  9. Adrienne Asch & Gail Geller (forthcoming). Feminism, Bioethics and Genetics. Feminism and Bioethics: Beyond Reproduction.
  10. S. Ashenden (2013). Reproblematising Relations of Agency and Coercion: Surrogacy. In Sumi Madhok, Anne Phillips & Kalpana Wilson (eds.), Gender, Agency, and Coercion. Palgrave Macmillan.
  11. Alison Bailey (2011). Reconceiving Surrogacy: Toward a Reproductive Justice Account of Indian Surrogacy. Hypatia 26 (4):715-741.
    My project here is to argue for situating moral judgments about Indian surrogacy in the context of Reproductive Justice. I begin by crafting the best picture of Indian surrogacy available to me while marking some worries I have about discursive colonialism and epistemic honesty. Western feminists' responses to contract pregnancy fall loosely into two interrelated moments: post-Baby M discussions that focus on the morality of surrogacy work in Western contexts, and feminist biomedical ethnographies that focus on the lived dimensions of (...)
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  12. Brenda M. Baker (1996). A Case for Permitting Altruistic Surrogacy. Hypatia 11 (2):34 - 48.
    Canada's Royal Commission on New Reproductive Technologies rejects all forms of surrogacy arrangement under the rubric of objecting to commercial surrogacy. Noncommercial surrogacy arrangements, however, can be defended against the commission's objections. They can be viewed as cases of giving a benefit or service to another in a way that expresses benevolence, and establishes a relationship between surrogates and prospective 'social' parents that allows mutual understanding and reciprocal personal interaction between them.
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  13. Jennifer Baker, Terry Dunbar & Margaret Scrimgeour (2010). Feminist Bioethics and Indigenous Research Reform in Australia : Is an Alliance Across Gender, Racial, and Cultural Borders a Useful Strategy for Promoting Change? In Jackie Leach Scully, Laurel Baldwin-Ragaven & Petya Fitzpatrick (eds.), Feminist Bioethics: At the Center, on the Margins. Johns Hopkins University Press.
  14. Angela Ballantyne & Sheryl de Lacey (2008). Wanted—Egg Donors for Research: A Research Ethics Approach to Donor Recruitment and Compensation. International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 1 (2):145-164.
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  15. Angela Ballantyne & Sheryl De Lacey (2008). Wanted—Egg Donors for Research: A Research Ethics Approach to Donor Recruitment and Compensation. International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 1 (2):145 - 164.
    As the demand for human eggs for stem cell research increases, debate about appropriate standards for recruitment and compensation of women intensifies. In the majority of cases, the source of eggs for research is women undergoing fertility treatment requiring ovarian stimulation and egg retrieval. The principle of "just participant selection" requires that research subjects be selected from the population that stands to benefit from the research. Based on this principle, infertile women should be actively recruited to donate eggs for fertility-related (...)
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  16. Amrita Banerjee (2011). Reorienting the Ethics of Transnational Surrogacy as a Feminist Pragmatist. The Pluralist 5 (3):107-127.
    The issue of surrogacy has received a great deal of attention in the West ever since the famous Baby M case in the latter part of the 1980s. Ethicists, psychologists, and legal experts have struggled with the meanings and implications of this practice, especially in its commercial form. In contemporary times, however, the phenomenon of surrogacy has assumed new dimensions as it travels across national borders in the context of globalization. As a transnational phenomenon, it is now marketed as an (...)
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  17. Françoise Baylis, Elisabeth Boetzkes, Alisa L. Carse, Jocelyn Downie, Lisa Handwerker, Helen Bequaert Holmes, Nikki Jones, Hilde Lindemann Nelson, Julien S. Murphy, Barbara Nicholas, Wendy A. Rogers, Mary V. Rorty, Laura Shanner, Susan Sherwin, Anita Silvers, Rosemarie Tong & Susan Wolf (1999). Embodying Bioethics: Recent Feminist Advances. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
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  18. Françoise Baylis & Carolyn McLeod (2007). The Stem Cell Debate Continues: The Buying and Selling of Eggs for Research. Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (12):726-731.
    Now that stem cell scientists are clamouring for human eggs for cloning-based stem cell research, there is vigorous debate about the ethics of paying women for their eggs. Generally speaking, some claim that women should be paid a fair wage for their reproductive labour or tissues, while others argue against the further commodification of reproductive labour or tissues and worry about voluntariness among potential egg providers. Siding mainly with those who believe that women should be financially compensated for providing eggs (...)
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  19. Dana Belu, Sylvia Burrow & Elizabeth Soliday (2012). Introduction: Feminism, Autonomy, and Reproductive Technology. Techne 16 (1):1-2.
  20. Elizabeth Ben-Ishai (2012). Responding to Vulnerability: The Case of Injection Drug Use. International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 5 (2):39-63.
    "Before they were 'junkies,' they were kids." The words appear on a poster, beneath a montage of photographs of children and the text: "Save Insite." Insite, located in Vancouver, Canada, is North America's first and only supervised injection facility (SIF). At Insite, people who use injection drugs can inject previously obtained drugs, such as heroin and cocaine, under medical supervision, using sterile equipment provided by this government-run facility. Opened under the auspices of a three-year exemption from federal drug laws in (...)
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  21. Leslie Bender (1997). Feminism & Bioethics: Beyond Reproduction. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 25 (1):58-61.
  22. Laura Benkov (1996). Reproduction, Ethics, and the Law: Feminist Perspectives (Book). Ethics and Behavior 6 (3):265 – 267.
  23. Belinda Bennett & Isabel Karpin (2008). Regulatory Options for Gender Equity in Health Research. International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 1 (2):80 - 99.
    It is clear that where a disease affects men and women differently, research on potential therapies or cures should include both men and women and should examine whether the therapy is effective and safe for both sexes. In this paper we consider whether there is an appropriate role for law in regulating to ensure an examination of these sex- and gender-specific aspects in health research. We consider the relative advantages and disadvantages of pursuing a regulatory approach to achieving gender equity (...)
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  24. Rosalie Ber (2000). Ethical Issues in Gestational Surrogacy. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 21 (2):153-169.
    The introduction of contraceptive technologies hasresulted in the separation of sex and procreation. Theintroduction of new reproductive technologies (mainlyIVF and embryo transfer) has led not only to theseparation of procreation and sex, but also to there-definition of the terms mother and family.For the purpose of this essay, I will distinguishbetween:1. the genetic mother – the donor of the egg;2. the gestational mother – she who bears and gives birth to the baby;3. the social mother – the woman who raises the (...)
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  25. Véronique Bergeron (2008). Bioethics and Women Across the Life Span (Review). International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 1 (2):179-182.
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  26. Véronique Bergeron (2008). Mary Briody Mahowald,Bioethics and Women Across the Life Span(Oxford University Press, 2006). International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 1 (2):179-182.
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  27. M. Julia Bertomeu (2009). Bioethics, Globalization, and Politics. International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 2 (1):33 - 51.
    Bioethics has evolved from a non-institutional, ideal, and ahistorical model toward a more political, institutional, and historically anchored one. This change is healthy and has, in part, been a product of the devastating consequences of globalization. I illustrate the distinct moments in the evolution of bioethics with an analysis of three discussions within the discipline: the debate on autonomy and the right to health (points 1 and 2) and some of the issues raised by biotechnology (point 3), especially by the (...)
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  28. Robyn Bluhm (2012). Vulnerability, Health, and Illness. International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 5 (2):147-161.
    It seems clear that being sick makes people vulnerable. Not only can even relatively mild, transient illnesses such as colds or flus serve as an unpleasant reminder of the vulnerability of the usual state of health that many of us are fortunate enough to enjoy, but more serious, chronic conditions can force individuals to adapt—or even abandon—life plans or projects, and can also alter their self-conception. Yet philosophical theories of health and disease do not discuss vulnerability, nor does it have (...)
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  29. Robyn Bluhm (2011). Feminist Bioethics: At the Center, on the Margins. Edited by Jackie Leach Scully, Laurel E. Baldwin-Ragaven, and Petya Fitzpatrick. International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 4 (2):154-159.
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  30. Robyn Bluhm (2011). Feminist Bioethics: At the Center, on the Margins. [REVIEW] International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 4 (2):154-159.
    Feminist Bioethics: At the Center, on the Margins is a collection of essays that “reflect on the positioning of feminist bioethics” (xi). The volume editors suggest that the discipline of feminist bioethics, twenty years after it began, faces tension between becoming incorporated into mainstream bioethics, which would mean that it has greater influence on bioethics as a whole, and remaining “on the margins,” where it can perhaps better continue its critical project of drawing attention to the ways in which “dominant (...)
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  31. Robyn Bluhm (2011). Gender Differences in Depression: Explanations From Feminist Ethics. International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 4 (1):69-88.
    Feminist bioethics is committed to recognizing the way that power differentials arising from differences in social location shape health and health care, and also to ensuring that women's experiences inform bioethical analyses (Sherwin 1992, 1998; Scully et al. 2010). Yet there may be a tension between these two points of emphasis, not because they are incompatible but because they require very different perspectives. In this article, I argue that feminist analyses of the relationship between gender and mental disorder have tended (...)
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  32. Amanda K. Booher (2010). Docile Bodies, Supercrips, and the Plays of Prosthetics. International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 3 (2):63-89.
    In 2007, Oscar Pistorius, a South African sprinter, was training and competing in preparation for the 2008 Beijing Olympic trials. Having had double transtibial amputations when he was eleven months old, Pistorius runs on technologically advanced prosthetics known as "Cheetah" legs. In January 2008, the International Association of Athletics Federation (IAAF) ruled him ineligible for IAAF competitions (including the Olympics) on the grounds that these carbon-fiber blade prosthetics were technical devices that gave him an advantage over other able-bodied sprinters. Pistorius (...)
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  33. Kirstin Borgerson (2009). Why Reading the Title Isn't Good Enough: An Evaluation of the 4S Approach to Evidence-Based Medicine. International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 2 (2):152-175.
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  34. Sarah-Vaughn Brakman & Sally J. Scholz (2006). Adoption, ART, and a Re-Conception of the Maternal Body: Toward Embodied Maternity. Hypatia 21 (1):54-73.
    : We criticize a view of maternity that equates the natural with the genetic and biological and show how such a practice overdetermines the maternal body and the maternal experience for women who are mothers through adoption and ART (Assisted Reproductive Technologies). As an alternative, we propose a new framework designed to rethink maternal bodies through the lens of feminist embodiment. Feminist embodied maternity, as we call it, stresses the particularity of experience through subjective embodiment. A feminist embodied maternity emphasizes (...)
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  35. Sylvia Burrow (2012). Reproductive Autonomy and Reproductive Technology. Techne 16 (1):31-45.
    This paper presents a relational account of autonomy showing that a technological imperative impedes autonomy through undermining women’s capacity to resist use of technology in the context of labor and birth. A technological imperative encourages dependence on technology for reassurance whenever possible through creating a (i) separation of maternal and fetal interests; and (ii) perceived need to use technology whenever possible. In response I offer an account of how women might promote autonomy through cultivating self-trust and self-confidence. Autonomy is not (...)
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  36. Jessica Robyn Cadwallader (2012). (Un)Expected Suffering: The Corporeal Specificity of Vulnerability. International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 5 (2):105-125.
    Judith Butler's (2006) account of vulnerability, resonant with other accounts offered by feminist theorists of embodiment (such as Margrit Shildrick [2000] and Rosalyn Diprose [2002]), underscores a "conception of the human . . . in which we are, from the start, given over to the other, one in which we are, from the start, even prior to individuation itself and, by virtue of bodily requirements, given over to some set of primary others" (31). She is concerned with how this state (...)
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  37. Leslie Cannold (1997). "There Is No Evidence to Suggest...": Changing the Way We Judge Information for Disclosure in the Informed Consent Process. Hypatia 12 (2):165 - 184.
    Feminist health activists and medical researchers frequently disagree on the adequacy of the informed consent processes in clinical trials. I argue for an informed consent process that reflects the central importance of patient-participant autonomy. Such a standard may raise concerns for medical researchers about their capacity to control the quantity and quality of the information they disclose to potential participants. These difficulties might be addressed by presenting potential participants with differently sized disclosure packages.
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  38. Jennifer Caseldine-Bracht (2010). The HPV Vaccine Controversy Where Are the Women? Where Are the Men? Where is the Money? International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 3 (1):99-112.
    In November 2006, Merck pharmaceuticals started a massive advertising and lobbying campaign aimed at promoting Gardasil, a vaccine that prevents cervical cancer from two of the thirty strains of the human papillomavirus (HPV) that can cause cervical cancer. Their advertising campaign, titled "One Less," touted the benefits of the vaccine through a series of commercials in which female actors stated that they wanted to be "one less woman who will battle cervical cancer. One less" (Merck 2007, 1). A few months (...)
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  39. Lisa Cassidy (2013). Thoughts on the Bioethics of Estranged Biological Kin. Hypatia 28 (1):32-48.
    This paper considers the bioethics of estranged biological kin, who are biologically related people not in contact with one another (due to adoption, abandonment, or other long-term estrangement). Specifically, I am interested in what is owed to estranged biological kin in the event of medical need. A survey of current bioethics demonstrates that most analyses are not prepared to reckon with the complications of having or being estranged biological kin. For example, adoptees might wonder if a lack of contact with (...)
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  40. Olio Center (1987). Mary B. Mahowald Sex-Role Stereotypes In Medicine. Hypatia 2 (2).
  41. Sonya Charles (2011). Obstetricians and Violence Against Women. American Journal of Bioethics 11 (12):51-56.
    I argue that the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG), as an organization and through its individual members, can and should be a far greater ally in the prevention of violence against women. Specifically, I argue that we need to pay attention to obstetrical practices that inadvertently contribute to the problem of violence against women. While intimate partner violence is a complex phenomenon, I focus on the coercive control of women and adherence to oppressive gender norms. Using physician response (...)
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  42. Wendy Chavkin, Vicki Breitbart & Paul H. Wise (1994). Finding Common Ground: The Necessity of an Integrated Agenda for Women's and Children's Health. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 22 (3):262-269.
  43. Amanda R. Clarke (2011). Beyond Reproduction: Women's Health, Activism, and Public Policy. International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 4 (2):159-164.
    In the current political climate, understanding women’s health is necessary to achieve progressive and equitable health care reform. Women access the healthcare system more frequently and in greater numbers than men, and are more likely to vote at the polls.1 Yet politicians, corporations, activists, and patients continue to disagree on the scope and definition of women’s health. In her book Beyond Reproduction: Women’s Health, Activism, and Public Policy, Karen L. Baird offers a retrospective analysis of the women’s health movement in (...)
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  44. Patrick Clipsham (2013). Comparing Policies on Conscientious Refusals: A Feminist Perspective. International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 6 (1):159-165.
    Given numerous ethical concerns with conscientious refusals by healthcare professionals, there is a need for detailed policies outlining the permissibility of conscientious refusals. I suggest that the Canadian Medical Association (CMA) and American Medical Association (AMA) policies are inadequate and that these associations have good reason to endorse more restrictive, more detailed policies regarding conscientious refusals, much like those endorsed by nursing associations.Health-care professionals sometimes refuse to participate in the administration of legal interventions because the administration of these interventions conflicts (...)
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  45. Drucilla Cornell (1993). Transformations: Recollective Imagination and Sexual Difference. Routledge.
    At a time when the political left have watched the apparent decline of socialism, and with it the cynical rejection of political hope, the question of how to rethink political transformation has become a pressing question. In Transformations Drucilla Cornell offers us a unique conception of recollective imagination which allows us to preserve and re-articulate the tradition of critical social theory. Cornell argues that psychoanalysis must play a role in social theory because we need to understand the connection between our (...)
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  46. G. K. D. Crozier (2010). Care Workers in the Global Market Appraising Applications of Feminist Care Ethics. International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 3 (1):113-137.
    In the current global care regime, care shortages in wealthy nations such as the United States, Canada, Italy, and Hong Kong are being addressed through the global supply of cheap migrant care labor from less wealthy nations. This paper argues that Feminist Care Ethics has a great deal to offer in the analysis of this global care regime. Joan Tronto's own critiques of the migration of care workers have focused on analogies between workers and imported slaves: both are intrinsically exploited, (...)
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  47. Inmaculada de Melo-Martín (2013). Sex Selection and the Procreative Liberty Framework. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 23 (1):1-18.
    Although surprising to some proponents of sex selection for non-medical reasons (Dahl 2005), a considerable amount of critical debate has been raised by this practice (Blyth, Frith, and Crawshaw 2008; Dawson and Trounson 1996; Dickens 2002; Harris 2005; Heyd 2003; Holm 2004; Macklin 2010; Malpani 2002; McDougall 2005; Purdy 2007; Seavilleklein and Sherwin 2007; Steinbock 2002; Strange and Chadwick 2010; Wilkinson 2008). While abortion or infanticide has long been used as means of sex selection, a new technology—preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD)—has (...)
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  48. Inmaculada de Melo-Martín (2006). Furthering Injustices Against Women: Genetic Information, Moral Obligations, and Gender. Bioethics 20 (6):301–307.
  49. Inmaculada de Melo-Martín (2004). On Our Obligation to Select the Best Children: A Reply to Savulescu. Bioethics 18 (1):72–83.
  50. D. Dickenson (1998). Leaky Bodies and Boundaries: Feminism, Postmodernism and (Bio) Ethics. Journal of Medical Ethics 24 (3):212-213.
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