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Profile: Gene Fendt (University of Nebraska at Kearney)
  1. Libidinal Economy and the Life of Logos.Gene Fendt - 1994 - Philosophy and Literature 18 (2):320-325.
  2. Sweet Use: Genre and Performance of the Merchant of Venice.Gene Fendt - 2009 - Philosophy and Literature 33 (2):pp. 280-295.
    This paper answers the questions ‘what is the Merchant of Venice?’ and ‘how may it accomplish its purpose?’ I argue that the usual treatments of this play are inadequate and show how the play is a comedy through which the passions appropriate for the good human being are engendered. What is raised and ridiculed are our own temptations to lesser joys and less sweet uses mimetically roused in us by the action and characters of the play. What is whetted but (...)
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  3.  14
    Platonic Errors: Plato, a Kind of Poet.Gene Fendt - 1998 - Greenwood Press.
    Poetic and dramatic readings of selected Platonic dialogues show the fallacy of the philosophical and political positions usually attributed to Plato.
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  4.  26
    Innate Corruption and the Space of Finite Freedom.Gene Fendt - 1994 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 68 (2):179-201.
    This paper explicates the relationship of innate corruption and natural goodness in Kant's Religion against a background of mistaken arguments and interpretations by Goethe, Allison, and Gordon Michalson, among others. It also argues that the only argument that can be given for the claim of innate moral corruption is a kind of ad hominem; it shows that Kant is giving such an argument, and argues that that argument is valid in its place. It concludes by saying that if this explication (...)
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  5.  48
    The Relation of Monologion and Proslogion.Gene Fendt - 2005 - Heythrop Journal 46 (2):149–166.
    This paper argues that Monologion and Proslogion though distinguishable are not really separable. They are distinct as "the way in" and "the way when one is in" but "the way in" reveals itself as a discovery of already being in; thus these ways are distinct in act, but not in being. Monologion moves from imaginary ignorance to real reverence, while Proslogion begins within reverence to achieve understanding.
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  6.  81
    Resolution, Catharsis, Culture: As You Like It.Gene Fendt - 1995 - Philosophy and Literature 19 (2):248-260.
    This paper is not so much a reading of Shakespeare's play as reading through As You Like It to the kinds of resolution and catharsis that can exist in comedy. We will find two kinds of resolution and catharsis, and within each kind two sub-types. We will then read through the figures of the play and the catharses available in it to the kinds of culture that need or can use each type of catharsis.
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  7.  42
    The Others In/Of Aristotle's Poetics.Gene Fendt - 1997 - Journal of Philosophical Research 22:245-260.
    This paper aims at interpreting (primarily) the first six chapters of Aristotle’s Poetics in a way that dissolves many of the scholarly arguments conceming them. It shows that Aristotle frequently identifies the object of his inquiry by opposing it to what is other than it (in several different ways). As a result aporiai arise where there is only supposed to be illuminating exclusion of one sort or another. Two exemplary cases of this in chapters 1-6 are Aristotle’s account of mimesis (...)
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  8.  38
    Plato's Mimetic Art.Gene Fendt - 2010 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 84:239-252.
    Plato’s dialogues are self-defined as works of mimetic art, and the ancients clearly consider mimesis as working naturally before reason and beneath it. Such aview connects with two contemporary ideas—Rene Girard’s idea of the mimetic basis of culture and neurophysiological research into mirror neurons. Individualityarises out of, and can collapse back into our mimetic origin. This para-rational notion of mimesis as that in which and by which all our knowledge is framed requires we not only concern ourselves with Socrates’s arguments (...)
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  9.  13
    Five Readings of Euthyphro.Gene Fendt - 2014 - Philosophy and Literature 38 (2):495-509.
    Euthyphro is frequently dissected for its philosophical dilemmas regarding god’s love’s relation to holiness, and whether justice is a part of the holy or the converse. But how can we understand it as a literary whole? This paper exhibits five ways in which it can be so understood: Euthyphro is the subjectivist patsy (both a literalist and divine command theorist) playing against Socrates’ natural law-like moral objectivity; the dialogue is elenchic because the dilemmas are true; the dialogue is elenchic, but (...)
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  10.  48
    Book Reviews. [REVIEW]Lewis S. Ford, Louis P. Pojman, Edward L. Schoen, Donald Wayne Viney, George I. Mavrodes & Gene Fendt - 1993 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 34 (3):181-194.
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  11.  4
    Ion: Plato’s Defense of Poetry.Gene Fendt - 1997 - International Studies in Philosophy 29 (4):23-50.
    This reading of Plato's Ion shows that the philosophic action mimed and engendered by the dialogue thoroughly reverses its (and Plato's) often supposed philosophical point, revealing that poetry is just as defensible as philosophy, and only in the same way. It is by Plato's indirections we find true directions out: the war between philosophy and poetry is a hoax on Plato's part, and a mistake on the part of his literalist readers. The dilemma around which the dialogue moves is false, (...)
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  12.  39
    Number, Form, Content: Hume's Dialogues , Number Nine.Gene Fendt - 2009 - Philosophy 84 (3):393-412.
    This paper's aim is threefold. First, I wish to show that there is an analogy in section nine that arises out of the interaction of the interlocutors; this analogy is, or has, a certain comic adequatic to the traditional (e.g. Aquinas's) arguments about proofs for the existence of God. Second, Philo's seemingly inconsequential example of the strange necessity of products of 9 in section nine is a perfected analogy of the broken arguments actually given in that section, destroying Philo's earlier (...)
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  13.  26
    God Is Love, Therefore There Is Evil.Gene Fendt - 1995 - Philosophy and Theology 9 (1/2):3-12.
    This paper attempts to explicate the philosophical and theological premisses involved in Fr. Paneloux’s second sermon in Camus’ The Plague. In that sermon Fr. Paneloux says that the suffering of children is our bread of affliction. The article shows where one must start in order to get to that point, and what follows from it. Whether or not the argument given should be called a theodicy or a reductio ad absurdum of religious belief is an open question for a philosopher, (...)
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  14. For What May I Hope? Thinking with Kant and Kierkegaard.Gene Fendt - 1990 - Peter Lang.
    This book exhibits the centrality of hope in Kant's critical philosophy, and brings into question the rationality of that hope, and how the question of that rationality can be raised. The question of the rationality of hope is further explored through Kierkegaard's writing.
     
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  15.  6
    Intentionality and Mimesis: Canonic Variations on an Ancient Grudge, Scored for New Mutinies.Gene Fendt - 1994 - Substance 23 (3):46.
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  16.  24
    Ion"Plato's Defense of Poetry".Gene Fendt - 1997 - International Studies in Philosophy 29 (4):23-50.
    Reads Ion, Plato's only dialogue on poetry as such, poetically—noting what it does as much as what it says. Doing so allows explanation of several historical anomalies and factual inconsistencies in it, and proves that the dilemma (techne/mania) of the dialogue is false; that the dilemma is intimately related to a view of language as names; that the flaw which the dialogue exhibits in the rhapsode is both moral and intellectual; that those flaws are not transferable simpliciter to the poem (...)
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  17.  12
    Socrates and the Gods: How to Read Plato's Euthyphro, Apology and Crito. By Nalin Ranasinghe. [REVIEW]Gene Fendt - 2014 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 88 (1):187-189.
  18.  27
    The Empiricist Looks at a Poem.Gene Fendt - 1997 - Philosophy and Literature 21 (2):306-318.
    Why would an empiricist look at a poem? And if he did, what could he find? This paper begins with Hume's programmatic statement for literary renewal based on the empirical principles set forth in the first Enquiry, and raises the question about the worth of poetry according to those principles. There is little "abstract reasoning concerning quantity or number, or experimental reasoning concerning matter of fact and existence" in poetry and so "commit it to the flames." The second Enquiry allows (...)
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  19.  20
    Book Review: Mimesis: Culture, Art, Society. [REVIEW]Gene Fendt - 1997 - Philosophy and Literature 21 (1):199-201.
  20.  23
    Confessions'bliss: Postmodern Criticism as a Palimpsest of Augustine's Confessions.Gene Fendt - 1995 - Heythrop Journal 36 (1):30–45.
    This paper reads through some contemporary literary critical problems and theorizing about textuality to Augustine's Confessions, to the enrichment, if not the ecstasy of both contemporary and medieval thinking. It shows that Augustine is both aware of much that passes as new in theorizing about language, and that his text is argumentatively and rhetorically structured to set difference at play. Like Augustine's writing, this article is a performance piece: besides arguing, it acknowledges; beside demonstration, it questions; besides telling, it shows; (...)
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  21.  14
    Upheavals of Thought. [REVIEW]Gene Fendt - 2004 - Faith and Philosophy 21 (3):402-406.
  22.  14
    Hippias Major, Version 1.0: Software for Post-Colonial, Multicultural Technology Systems.Gene Fendt - 2003 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 37 (1):89–99.
    The first half of Plato’s Hippias Major exhibits the interfacing of the first teacher (Socrates) with the first version of a post-colonial, multi-cultural information technology system (Hippias). In this interface the purposes, results, and values of two contradictory types of operating system for educational servicing units are exhibited to, and can be discovered by, anyone who is not an information technologist.
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  23.  1
    The Others In/Of Aristotle’s Poetics.Gene Fendt - 1997 - Journal of Philosophical Research 22:245-260.
    This paper aims at interpreting the first six chapters of Aristotle’s Poetics in a way that dissolves many of the scholarly arguments conceming them. It shows that Aristotle frequently identifies the object of his inquiry by opposing it to what is other than it. As a result aporiai arise where there is only supposed to be illuminating exclusion of one sort or another. Two exemplary cases of this in chapters 1-6 are Aristotle’s account of mimesis as other than enunciative speech (...)
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  24.  1
    The Problem of Reading Confessions: Augustine’s Double Argument Against Drama.Gene Fendt - 1998 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 72:171-184.
    In Augustine's Confessions we can find two arguments against drama. One is entirely Platonic, echoing the problems raised in Republic 2 and 3 that representations of evil encourage moral turpitude. The other, an echo of Republic 10, is much more visible in Confessions, and Augustine is more perspicuous than Plato in laying out the difficulty; it has to do with the immoral effect of suffering grief at staged sufferings, where we are moved neither to escape the suffering nor to aid (...)
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  25.  7
    The (Moral) Problem of Reading Confessions.Gene Fendt - 1998 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 72:171-184.
    In Augustine's Confessions we can find two arguments against drama. One of them is entirely Platonic, echoing the problems raised in Republic 2 and 3 that representations of evil encourage moral turpitude. The other, which can be found in Republic 10, is much more visible in Confessions, and Augustine is more perspicuous than Plato in laying out the difficulty; it has to do with the immoral effect of suffering grief at staged sufferings, where we are moved neither to escape the (...)
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  26.  1
    ION: Plato's Defense of Poetry.Gene Fendt - 1997 - International Studies in Philosophy 29 (4):23-50.
  27. Comic Cure for Delusional Democracy: Plato's Republic.Gene Fendt - 2014 - Lexington Books.
    In this book, author Gene Fendt shows how Plato's Republic provides a liturgical purification for the political and psychic delusions of democratic readers, even as Socrates provides the same for his interlocutors at the festival of Bendis. Each of the several characters is analyzed in accord with Book Eight's 6 geometrically possible kinds of character showing how their answers and failures in the dialogue exhibit the particular kind of movement and blindness predictable for the type.
     
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  28. Confessions’Bliss: Postmodern Criticism as a Palimpsest of Augustine's Confessions.Gene Fendt - 1995 - Heythrop Journal 36 (1):30-45.
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  29. Hippias Major, Version 1.0: Software for Post-Colonial, Multicultural Technology Systems.Gene Fendt - 2003 - Philosophy of Education 37 (1):89-99.
    The first half of Plato’s Hippias Major exhibits the interfacing of the first teacher (Socrates) with the first version of a post-colonial, multi-cultural information technology system (Hippias). In this interface the purposes, results, and values of two contradictory types of operating system for educational servicing units are exhibited to, and can be discovered by, anyone who is not an information technologist.
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  30. Number, Form, Content: Hume's 'Dialogues'.Gene Fendt - 2009 - Philosophy 84 (3):393 - 412.
    This paper’s aim is threefold. First, I wish to show that there is an analogy in section nine that arises out of the interaction of the interlocutors; this analogy is, or has, a certain comic adequatio to the traditional (e.g., Aquinas’s) arguments about proofs for the existence of God. Second, Philo’s seemingly inconsequential example of the strange necessity of products of 9 in section nine is a perfected analogy of the broken arguments actually given in that section, destroying Philo’s earlier (...)
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  31. Number, Form, Content: Hume's Dialogues, Number Nine: Gene Fendt.Gene Fendt - 2009 - Philosophy 84 (3):393-412.
    This paper's aim is threefold. First, I wish to show that there is an analogy in section nine that arises out of the interaction of the interlocutors; this analogy is, or has, a certain comic adequatic to the traditional arguments about proofs for the existence of God. Second, Philo's seemingly inconsequential example of the strange necessity of products of 9 in section nine is a perfected analogy of the broken arguments actually given in that section, destroying Philo's earlier arguments. Finally, (...)
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  32. Plato’s Mimetic Art: The Power of the Mimetic and Complexity of Reading Plato.Gene Fendt - 2010 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 84:239-252.
    Plato’s dialogues are self-defined as works of mimetic art, and the ancients clearly consider mimesis as working naturally before reason and beneath it. Such aview connects with two contemporary ideas—Rene Girard’s idea of the mimetic basis of culture and neurophysiological research into mirror neurons. Individualityarises out of, and can collapse back into our mimetic origin. This para-rational notion of mimesis as that in which and by which all our knowledge is framed requires we not only concern ourselves with Socrates’s arguments (...)
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  33. Sublimity and Human Works.Gene Fendt - 1995 - Proceedings of the Eighth International Kant Congress 2:509-517.
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  34. Upheavals of Thought: The Intelligence of the Emotions. [REVIEW]Gene Fendt - 2004 - Faith and Philosophy 21 (3):402-406.
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