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Gene Fendt
University of Nebraska at Kearney
  1. Ion: Plato’s Defense of Poetry.Gene Fendt - 1997 - International Studies in Philosophy 29 (4):23-50.
    This reading of Plato's Ion shows that the philosophic action mimed and engendered by the dialogue thoroughly reverses its (and Plato's) often supposed philosophical point, revealing that poetry is just as defensible as philosophy, and only in the same way. It is by Plato's indirections we find true directions out: the war between philosophy and poetry is a hoax on Plato's part, and a mistake on the part of his literalist readers. The dilemma around which the dialogue moves is false, (...)
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  2.  37
    How to Play the Platonic Flute: Mimêsis and Truth in Republic X.Gene Fendt - 2018 - In Heather L. Reid & Jeremy C. DeLong (eds.), The Many Faces of Mimēsis: Selected Essays from the Third Interdisciplinary Symposium on the Heritage of Western Greece,. Sioux City, IA, USA: Parnassos Press. pp. 37-48.
    The usual interpretation of Republic 10 takes it as Socrates’ multilevel philosophical demonstration of the untruth and dangerousness of mimesis and its required excision from a well ordered polity. Such readings miss the play of the Platonic mimesis which has within it precisely ordered antistrophes which turn its oft remarked strophes perfectly around. First, this argument, famously concluding to the unreliability of image-makers for producing knowledge begins with two images—the mirror (596e) and the painter. I will show both undercut the (...)
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  3.  21
    Reason, Feeling, and Happiness: Bridging an Ancient/Modern Divide in The Plague.Gene Fendt - 2019 - Philosophy and Literature 43 (2):350-368.
    Camus is defined by many as an absurdist philosopher of revolt. The Plague, however, shows him working rigorously through a well-known division between ancient and modern ethics concerning the relation of reason, feeling and happiness. For Aristotle, the virtues are stable dispositions including affective and intellectual elements. For Kant, one’s particular feelings are either that from which we must abstract to judge moral worth, or are a constant hindrance to proper moral activity. Further, Kant claims “habit belongs to the physical (...)
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  4.  20
    The Augustinianism of Albert Camus' The Plague.Gene Fendt - 2020 - Heythrop Journal 61 (3):471-482.
    Camus himself called The Plague his most anti-Christian text, and most theologically oriented readings of the text agree. This paper shows how the sermons of Fr. Paneloux—an Augustine scholar--as well as Dr. Rieux’s mother present an Augustinian picture of love. This love opposes the passionate concupiscence for possession of things with the divine love which wishes for the constant conscious presence of the beloved in the light of the good. Such is possible for us, as Augustine exhibits and helps us (...)
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  5. Libidinal Economy and the Life of Logos.Gene Fendt - 1994 - Philosophy and Literature 18 (2):320-325.
  6.  92
    The Others In/Of Aristotle’s Poetics.Gene Fendt - 1997 - Journal of Philosophical Research 22:245-260.
    This paper aims at interpreting the first six chapters of Aristotle’s Poetics in a way that dissolves many of the scholarly arguments conceming them. It shows that Aristotle frequently identifies the object of his inquiry by opposing it to what is other than it. As a result aporiai arise where there is only supposed to be illuminating exclusion of one sort or another. Two exemplary cases of this in chapters 1-6 are Aristotle’s account of mimesis as other than enunciative speech (...)
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  7. Sweet Use: Genre and Performance of the Merchant of Venice.Gene Fendt - 2009 - Philosophy and Literature 33 (2):pp. 280-295.
    This paper answers the questions ‘what is the Merchant of Venice?’ and ‘how may it accomplish its purpose?’ I argue that the usual treatments of this play are inadequate and show how the play is a comedy through which the passions appropriate for the good human being are engendered. What is raised and ridiculed are our own temptations to lesser joys and less sweet uses mimetically roused in us by the action and characters of the play. What is whetted but (...)
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  8.  26
    Five Readings of Euthyphro.Gene Fendt - 2014 - Philosophy and Literature 38 (2):495-509.
    Euthyphro is frequently dissected for its philosophical dilemmas regarding god’s love’s relation to holiness, and whether justice is a part of the holy or the converse. But how can we understand it as a literary whole? This paper exhibits five ways in which it can be so understood: Euthyphro is the subjectivist patsy (both a literalist and divine command theorist) playing against Socrates’ natural law-like moral objectivity; the dialogue is elenchic because the dilemmas are true; the dialogue is elenchic, but (...)
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  9.  18
    Platonic Errors: Plato, a Kind of Poet.Gene Fendt - 1998 - Greenwood Press.
    Poetic and dramatic readings of selected Platonic dialogues show the fallacy of the philosophical and political positions usually attributed to Plato.
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  10.  11
    Augustine and Kierkegaard. Edited by John Doody, Kim Paffenroth, and Helene Tallon Russell. [REVIEW]Gene Fendt - 2019 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 93 (3):577-579.
    Review of an edited book of articles by various authors, each article on some aspect of both thinkers.
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  11.  15
    Aristotle on Dramatic Musical Composition. By Gregory Scott.Gene Fendt - 2019 - Ancient Philosophy 39 (1):248-252.
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  12.  52
    Confessions’Bliss: Postmodern Criticism as a Palimpsest of Augustine's Confessions.Gene Fendt - 1995 - Heythrop Journal 36 (1):30-45.
    This paper reads through some contemporary literary critical problems and theorizing about textuality to Augustine's Confessions, to the enrichment, if not the ecstasy of both contemporary and medieval thinking. It shows that Augustine is both aware of much that passes as new in theorizing about language, and that his text is argumentatively and rhetorically structured to set difference at play. Like Augustine's writing, this article is a performance piece: besides arguing, it acknowledges; beside demonstration, it questions; besides telling, it shows; (...)
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  13.  17
    Readings of Plato’s Apology of Socrates: Defending The Philosophical Life. Edited by Vivil Valvik Haralden, Olof Pettersson, and Oda E. Wiese Tvedt. [REVIEW]Gene Fendt - 2019 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 93 (1):177-178.
  14.  98
    The Relation of Monologion and Proslogion.Gene Fendt - 2005 - Heythrop Journal 46 (2):149–166.
    This paper argues that Monologion and Proslogion though distinguishable are not really separable. They are distinct as "the way in" and "the way when one is in" but "the way in" reveals itself as a discovery of already being in; thus these ways are distinct in act, but not in being. Monologion moves from imaginary ignorance to real reverence, while Proslogion begins within reverence to achieve understanding.
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  15.  46
    Sublimity and Human Works: Kant on Tragedy and War.Gene Fendt - 1995 - Proceedings of the Eighth International Kant Congress 2:509-517.
    Kant admits that there are two kinds of human works that have something sublime about them, the work of the poet, e.g., tragedy, and the work of the politician, i.e., war. This paper will explore Kant's reasoning about the sublime element in these two human works.
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  16.  44
    Innate Corruption and the Space of Finite Freedom.Gene Fendt - 1994 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 68 (2):179-201.
    This paper explicates the relationship of innate corruption and natural goodness in Kant's Religion against a background of mistaken arguments and interpretations by Goethe, Allison, and Gordon Michalson, among others. It also argues that the only argument that can be given for the claim of innate moral corruption is a kind of ad hominem; it shows that Kant is giving such an argument, and argues that that argument is valid in its place. It concludes by saying that if this explication (...)
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  17. Resolution, Catharsis, Culture: As You Like It.Gene Fendt - 1995 - Philosophy and Literature 19 (2):248-260.
    This paper is not so much a reading of Shakespeare's play as reading through As You Like It to the kinds of resolution and catharsis that can exist in comedy. We will find two kinds of resolution and catharsis, and within each kind two sub-types. We will then read through the figures of the play and the catharses available in it to the kinds of culture that need or can use each type of catharsis.
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  18.  61
    The Others In/Of Aristotle’s Poetics.Gene Fendt - 1997 - Journal of Philosophical Research 22:245-260.
    This paper aims at interpreting (primarily) the first six chapters of Aristotle’s Poetics in a way that dissolves many of the scholarly arguments conceming them. It shows that Aristotle frequently identifies the object of his inquiry by opposing it to what is other than it (in several different ways). As a result aporiai arise where there is only supposed to be illuminating exclusion of one sort or another. Two exemplary cases of this in chapters 1-6 are Aristotle’s account of mimesis (...)
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  19.  15
    Socrates as the Mimesis of Piety in Republic.Gene Fendt - 2018 - International Philosophical Quarterly 58 (3):243-254.
    The absence of any discussion of the virtue of piety in Plato’s Republic has been much remarked, but there are textual clues by which to recognize its importance for Plato’s construction and for the book’s intended effect. This dialogue is Socrates’s repetition, on the day after the first festival of Bendis, of a liturgical action that he undertook—at his own expense, at the “vote” of his “city”—on the previous day. Socrates’s activity in repeating it the next day is an “ethological” (...)
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  20.  61
    Plato’s Mimetic Art: The Power of the Mimetic and Complexity of Reading Plato.Gene Fendt - 2010 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 84:239-252.
    Plato’s dialogues are self-defined as works of mimetic art, and the ancients clearly consider mimesis as working naturally before reason and beneath it. Such aview connects with two contemporary ideas—Rene Girard’s idea of the mimetic basis of culture and neurophysiological research into mirror neurons. Individualityarises out of, and can collapse back into our mimetic origin. This para-rational notion of mimesis as that in which and by which all our knowledge is framed requires we not only concern ourselves with Socrates’s arguments (...)
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  21.  53
    God Is Love, Therefore There Is Evil.Gene Fendt - 1995 - Philosophy and Theology 9 (1/2):3-12.
    This paper attempts to explicate the philosophical and theological premisses involved in Fr. Paneloux’s second sermon in Camus’ The Plague. In that sermon Fr. Paneloux says that the suffering of children is our bread of affliction. The article shows where one must start in order to get to that point, and what follows from it. Whether or not the argument given should be called a theodicy or a reductio ad absurdum of religious belief is an open question for a philosopher, (...)
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  22.  41
    The (Moral) Problem of Reading Confessions.Gene Fendt - 1998 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 72:171-184.
    In Augustine's Confessions we can find two arguments against drama. One of them is entirely Platonic, echoing the problems raised in Republic 2 and 3 that representations of evil encourage moral turpitude. The other, which can be found in Republic 10, is much more visible in Confessions, and Augustine is more perspicuous than Plato in laying out the difficulty; it has to do with the immoral effect of suffering grief at staged sufferings, where we are moved neither to escape the (...)
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  23.  54
    Number, Form, Content: Hume's Dialogues , Number Nine.Gene Fendt - 2009 - Philosophy 84 (3):393-412.
    This paper's aim is threefold. First, I wish to show that there is an analogy in section nine that arises out of the interaction of the interlocutors; this analogy is, or has, a certain comic adequatic to the traditional (e.g. Aquinas's) arguments about proofs for the existence of God. Second, Philo's seemingly inconsequential example of the strange necessity of products of 9 in section nine is a perfected analogy of the broken arguments actually given in that section, destroying Philo's earlier (...)
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  24.  55
    Book Reviews. [REVIEW]Lewis S. Ford, Louis P. Pojman, Edward L. Schoen, Donald Wayne Viney, George I. Mavrodes & Gene Fendt - 1993 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 34 (3):181-194.
  25.  45
    Book Review: Mimesis: Culture, Art, Society. [REVIEW]Gene Fendt - 1997 - Philosophy and Literature 21 (1):199-201.
  26. For What May I Hope? Thinking with Kant and Kierkegaard.Gene Fendt - 1990 - Peter Lang.
    This book exhibits the centrality of hope in Kant's critical philosophy, and brings into question the rationality of that hope, and how the question of that rationality can be raised. The question of the rationality of hope is further explored through Kierkegaard's writing.
     
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  27.  23
    Socrates and the Gods: How to Read Plato's Euthyphro, Apology and Crito. By Nalin Ranasinghe. [REVIEW]Gene Fendt - 2014 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 88 (1):187-189.
  28.  15
    Intentionality and Mimesis: Canonic Variations on an Ancient Grudge, Scored for New Mutinies.Gene Fendt - 1994 - Substance 23 (3):46.
    The thesis of this text is that representation and mimesis, and so reason and passion, are not opposed, but differ. Their presumed opposition leads to many false and therefore harmful ideas and practices, as Glaucon exhibits in his republic, but even these harmful ideas and practices exhibit not only that it is not possible to escape either mimesis or representation but also that the harm is precisely to develop a culture along the lines of a hegemonic structure wherein one is (...)
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  29.  42
    The Empiricist Looks at a Poem.Gene Fendt - 1997 - Philosophy and Literature 21 (2):306-318.
    Why would an empiricist look at a poem? And if he did, what could he find? This paper begins with Hume's programmatic statement for literary renewal based on the empirical principles set forth in the first Enquiry, and raises the question about the worth of poetry according to those principles. There is little "abstract reasoning concerning quantity or number, or experimental reasoning concerning matter of fact and existence" in poetry and so "commit it to the flames." The second Enquiry allows (...)
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  30.  12
    Number, Form, Content: Hume's Dialogues, Number Nine: Gene Fendt.Gene Fendt - 2009 - Philosophy 84 (3):393-412.
    This paper's aim is threefold. First, I wish to show that there is an analogy in section nine that arises out of the interaction of the interlocutors; this analogy is, or has, a certain comic adequatic to the traditional arguments about proofs for the existence of God. Second, Philo's seemingly inconsequential example of the strange necessity of products of 9 in section nine is a perfected analogy of the broken arguments actually given in that section, destroying Philo's earlier arguments. Finally, (...)
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  31.  30
    Upheavals of Thought: The Intelligence of the Emotions. [REVIEW]Gene Fendt - 2004 - Faith and Philosophy 21 (3):402-406.
  32.  31
    Hippias Major, Version 1.0: Software for Post-Colonial, Multicultural Technology Systems.Gene Fendt - 2003 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 37 (1):89–99.
    The first half of Plato’s Hippias Major exhibits the interfacing of the first teacher (Socrates) with the first version of a post-colonial, multi-cultural information technology system (Hippias). In this interface the purposes, results, and values of two contradictory types of operating system for educational servicing units are exhibited to, and can be discovered by, anyone who is not an information technologist.
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  33.  7
    Hippias Major, Version 1.0: Software for Post-Colonial, Multicultural Technology Systems.Gene Fendt - 2003 - Philosophy of Education 37 (1):89-99.
    The first half of Plato’s Hippias Major exhibits the interfacing of the first teacher (Socrates) with the first version of a post-colonial, multi-cultural information technology system (Hippias). In this interface the purposes, results, and values of two contradictory types of operating system for educational servicing units are exhibited to, and can be discovered by, anyone who is not an information technologist.
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  34. Aristotle and Tolkien: An Essay in Comparative Poetics.Gene Fendt - 2019 - Christian Scholar's Review 49 (Number 1 (Fall 2019)).
    Both Aristotle and Tolkien are authors of short works seemingly concentrated on one form of literary art. Both works contain references which seem to extend further than that single art and offer insights into the worth and purpose of art more generally. Both men understand the relevant processes of mind of the artist in a similar way, and both distinguish the value of works of art based on their effect on the audience. But Tolkien figures the natural human artistic bent (...)
     
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  35.  18
    Comic Cure for Delusional Democracy: Plato's Republic.Gene Fendt - 2014 - Lexington Books.
    In this book, author Gene Fendt shows how Plato's Republic provides a liturgical purification for the political and psychic delusions of democratic readers, even as Socrates provides the same for his interlocutors at the festival of Bendis. Each of the several characters is analyzed in accord with Book Eight's 6 geometrically possible kinds of character showing how their answers and failures in the dialogue exhibit the particular kind of movement and blindness predictable for the type.
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  36.  3
    Love Song for the Life of the Mind: An Essay on the Purpose of Comedy.Gene Fendt - 2007 - Washington, DC, USA: Catholic University of America Press.
    Prefaced by an argument that the ancients understood mimesis as fundamental to being human, and art as therefore essential to human moral and intellectual development, this book starts from the problematic status of the (happily ending) Iphigenia in Poetics. How Aristotle must explicate tragedy to hold Iphigenia as the best thus sets up the exploration of comedy. Chapter two shows that comedy aims at the catharsis of desire and sympathy. This analysis is then applied in detail to Aristophanes’ Acharnians, Shakespeare’s (...)
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  37. Psychology, Character, and Performance in Hamlet.Gene Fendt - 2008 - In Ignatius Critical Editions: Hamlet. San Francisco, CA, USA: Ignatius Press. pp. 217-230.
    As Shakespeare is closer in time and spirit to medieval psychology than to popular modern explanations of psyche, this article presents a fourfold analysis of ecstasy from Aquinas' Summa Theologiae to examine the characters of the play. I also suggest performance choices which make a variety of these ecstasies of soul more visible.
     
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  38. Pagan Politics, War, and the Construction of Nomoi.Gene Fendt - 1997 - In Plato's Political Philosophy, Vol. 2. Athens, Greece: pp. 58-71.
  39. The Anatomy of Truth: Literary Modes as a Kantian Model for Understanding the Openness of Knowledge and Morality to Faith.Gene Fendt - 2006 - In Chris L. Firestone & Stephen R. Palmquist (eds.), Kant and the New Philosophy of Religion. Bloomington, IN, USA: Indiana University Press. pp. 90-104.
    Kant's famous statement (from the first Critique) that he found it necessary to deny knowledge in order to make room for faith acknowledges a religious or theological telos to the entire critical project. This article outlines a series of relations of 'knowledge' to 'faith' in the architectonic repetitions with variation that plays from the first Critique through the Religion. Various deployments of 'truth' at each stage presume a kind of 'faith' or trust all the way along. These deployments are shown (...)
     
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  40. The Writ Against Religious Drama: Frater Taciturnus V. Søren Kierkegaard.Gene Fendt - 1997 - In Niels J. Cappelørn (ed.), Kierkegaard Revisited: Proceedings From the Conference "Kierkegaard and the Meaning of Meaning It", Copenhagen, May 5-9, 1996. Berlin, Germany: pp. 48-74.
    In a very literarily complicated setting, Frater Taciturnus sets a remark about Hamlet not being a Christian tragedy. After unpeeling that literary setting and noting that Taciturnus' remark aims more at Jacob Börne than at Shakespeare, the paper shows how Frater Taciturnus' remark calls into question the religious project of a certain danish author. For, Taciturnus' primary concern is to show that religious drama is not possible, or at least "ought not be." This general law applies to Hamlet as well, (...)
     
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  41. Works of Love?: Reflections on 'Works of Love'.Gene Fendt - 1993 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 33 (2):123-125.
     
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