Results for 'Self (Philosophy) History'

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  1.  20
    The Self: A History.Patricia Kitcher (ed.) - 2021 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    "No philosophical dictum is better known than Descartes's assertion about the intimate relation between thinking and existing. What remains unknown is how we are to understand the 'I' who thinks and exists. This book is about the ways that the concept of an 'I' or a 'self' has been developed and deployed at different times in the history of Western Philosophy. It also offers a striking contrast case, the 'interconnected' self, who appears in some expressions of (...)
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  2. The History of Sexual Anatomy and Self-Referential Philosophy of Science.Alan G. Soble - 2003 - Metaphilosophy 34 (3):229-249.
    This essay is a case study of the self-destruction that occurs in the work of a social-constructionist historian of science who embraces a radical philosophy of science. It focuses on Thomas Laqueur's Making Sex: Body and Gender from the Greeks to Freud in arguing that a history of science committed to the social construction of science and to the central theses of Kuhnian, Duhemian, and Quinean philosophy of science is incoherent through self-reference. Laqueur's text is (...)
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  3.  1
    Socialism.Peter Self - 2017 - In Robert E. Goodin, Philip Pettit & Thomas Pogge (eds.), A Companion to Contemporary Political Philosophy. Oxford, UK: Blackwell. pp. 414–438.
    Socialism grew up in opposition to capitalism, just as liberalism developed in reaction to feudalism. Both liberalism and socialism combined potent critiques of the existing socio‐economic order with blueprints for a desirable future society. However, liberalism provides a rather more coherent body of thought than does socialism, and its theories are linked with the emergence of a dominant system combining capitalism and liberal democracy. By contrast, no widespread socio‐economic order has as yet emerged which can be confidently or closely associated (...)
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  4.  5
    The self and its pleasures: Bataille, Lacan, and the history of the decentered subject.Carolyn Janice Dean - 1992 - Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press.
    In this innovative cultural history, Carolyn J. Dean sheds light on the origins of poststructuralist thought, paying particular attention to the reinterpretation of the self by Jacques Lacan, Georges Bataille, and other French thinkers.
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  5. Self-Awareness in Islamic Philosophy: Avicenna and Beyond.Jari Kaukua - 2014 - Cambridge, United Kingdom: Cambridge University Press.
    This important book investigates the emergence and development of a distinct concept of self-awareness in post-classical, pre-modern Islamic philosophy. Jari Kaukua presents the first extended analysis of Avicenna's arguments on self-awareness - including the flying man, the argument from the unity of experience, the argument against reflection models of self-awareness and the argument from personal identity - arguing that all these arguments hinge on a clearly definable concept of self-awareness as pure first-personality. He substantiates his (...)
     
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  6. Rewriting the self: histories from the Renaissance to the present.Roy Porter (ed.) - 1997 - New York: Routledge.
    Rewriting the Self is an exploration of ideas of the self in the western cultural tradition from the Renaissance to the present. The contributors analyze different religious, philosophical, psychological, political, psychoanalytical and literary models of personal identity from a number of viewpoints, including the history of ideas, contemporary gender politics, and post-modernist literary theory. Challenging the received version of the "ascent of western man," they assess the discursive construction of the self in the light of political, (...)
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  7. The Category of the person: anthropology, philosophy, history.Michael Carrithers, Steven Collins & Steven Lukes (eds.) - 1985 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    The concept that peope have of themselves as a 'person' is one of the most intimate notions that they hold. Yet the way in which the category of the person is conceived varies over time and space. In this volume, anthropologists, philosophers, and historians examine the notion of the person in different cultures, past and present. Taking as their starting point a lecture on the person as a category of the human mind, given by Marcel Mauss in 1938, the contributors (...)
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  8.  8
    Self-Knowledge: A History.Ursula Renz (ed.) - 2016 - New York: Oxford University Press USA.
    The acquisition of self-knowledge is often described as one of the main goals of philosophical inquiry. At the same time, some sort of self-knowledge is often regarded as a necessary condition of our being a human agent or human subject. Thus self-knowledge is taken to constitute both the beginning and the end of humans' search for wisdom, and as such it is intricately bound up with the very idea of philosophy. Not surprisingly therefore, the Delphic injunction (...)
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  9.  4
    The Self in Indian philosophy.Kāliprasāda Siṃha - 1991 - Calcutta: Punthi Pustak.
    This Work Deals With The Concept Of The Individual Self As Found In All The Well-Known Systems Of Indian Philosophy Including Those Of Vaisnavism, Saivism And Saktism.
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  10. Continental philosophy since 1750: the rise and fall of the self.Robert C. Solomon - 1988 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    The flowering of creative and speculative philosophy that emerged in modern Europe--particularly in Germany--is a thrilling adventure story as well as an essential chapter in the history of philosophy. In this integrative narrative, Solomon provides an accessible introduction to the major authors and movements of modern European philosophy, including the Enlightenment and Romanticism, Rousseau, German Idealism, Kant, Fichte, Schelling and the Romantics, Hegel, Schopenhauer, Kierkegaard, Feuerbach, Max Brentano, Meinong, Frege, Dilthey, Bergson, Nietzsche, Husserl, Freud, Wittgenstein, Heidegger, (...)
     
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  11.  12
    Individualism and self-knowledge, Tyler bürge the history of philosophy as a discipline, Michael Frede.Rayme E. Engel - 1988 - Journal of Philosophy 85 (12).
  12.  55
    Self-Creation, Identity and Authenticity: A Study of "A History of Violence" and "Eastern Promises".Daniel Moseley - 2012 - In Simon Riches (ed.), The Philosophy of David Cronenberg. University Press of Kentucky.
    This essay explores philosophical questions about practical identity that emerge in David Cronenberg's films, "A History of Violence" and "Eastern Promises." I distinguish the metaphysical problems of personal identity from the practical problems and contend that the latter are of central importance to the topic of authenticity. Central scenes from both films are examined with an eye to their engagement with the issues of authenticity and self-creation.
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  13.  42
    Self, value, and narrative: a Kierkegaardian approach.Anthony Rudd - 2012 - Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    Anthony Rudd presents a striking new account of the self as an ethical, evaluative being.
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  14.  16
    Self-defense: a philosophy of violence.Elsa Dorlin - 2022 - Brooklyn: Verso. Edited by Kieran Aarons.
    Philosopher Elsa Dorlin looks across the global history of the left to trace the politics, philosophy, and ethics of self defense.
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  15.  4
    History and the self.Hilda Diana Oakeley - 1934 - London,: Williams & Norgate.
  16.  2
    Philosophy, Openness, and the Imperative of Continuous Self-Renewal.Pascah Mungwini - 2022 - Filosofia Theoretica 11 (2):27-42.
    Philosophy premises itself on the ideals of openness and continuous self-renewal. And yet, the story of philosophy has been an endless struggle against the violence of systematic exclusion and erasure. This article deploys the principle of openness as an analytic category to reflect on the broader question of epistemic decolonisation and the imperative this imposes on the practice of philosophy. There are important ontological, epistemological, and ethical dimensions to the principle of openness with a bearing on (...)
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  17.  2
    The fractured self in Freud and German philosophy.Matthew C. Altman & Cynthia D. Coe - 2013 - New York, NY: Palgrave-Macmillan. Edited by Cynthia D. Coe.
    The Fractured Self in Freud and German Philosophy examines Freud's transformation of German philosophical approaches to freedom, history, and self-knowledge; defends a theory of situated knowledge and agency; and considers the relevance of Freudian thought for contemporary cultural issues.
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  18.  17
    Sacrifice Regained: Morality and Self-Interest in British Moral Philosophy From Hobbes to Bentham.Roger Crisp - 2019 - New York, NY, United States of America: Oxford University Press.
    From Thomas Hobbes to Jeremy Bentham, 'British Moralists' have questioned whether being virtuous makes you happy. Roger Crisp elucidaties their views on happiness and virtue, self-interest and sacrifice, and well-being and morality, and highlights key themes such as psychological egoism, evaluative hedonism, and moral reason in their thought.
  19.  35
    Time/History, Self-disclosure and Anticipation: Pannenberg, Heidegger and the Question of Metaphysics.Najeeb G. Awad - 2011 - Sophia 50 (1):113-133.
    This essay examines Wolfhart Pannenberg’s defense of metaphysics’ foundational importance for philosophy and theology. Among all the modern philosophers whose claims Pannenberg challenges, Martin Heidegger’s discourse against Western metaphysics receives the major portion of criticism. The first thing one concludes from this criticism is an affirmation of a wide intellectual gap that separates Pannenberg’s thought from Heidegger’s, as if each stands at the very opposite corner of the other’s school of thought. The questions this essay tackles are: is this (...)
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  20. The history of philosophy and the puzzles of life. Windelband and Dilthey on the ahistorical core of philosophical thinking.Katherina Kinzel - 2019 - In Martin Kusch, Katherina Kinzel, Johannes Steizinger & Niels Jacob Wildschut (eds.), The Emergence of Relativism: German Thought from the Enlightenment to National Socialism. London: Routledge. pp. 26-42.
    The professionalization of the study of history in the Nineteenth Century made possible a new way of thinking about the history of philosophy: the thought emerged that philosophy itself might be relative to time, historical culture, and nationality. The simultaneous demise of speculative metaphysics scattered philosophers’ confidence that the historical variance of philosophical systems could be viewed in terms of the teleological self-realization of reason. Towards the late Nineteenth Century, philosophers began to explicitly address the (...)
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  21.  29
    Comparisons in the history of philosophy: a review of The metaphysics of Margaret Cavendish and Anne Conway: monism, vitalism, and self-motion_ Comparisons in the history of philosophy: a review of _The metaphysics of Margaret Cavendish and Anne Conway: monism, vitalism, and self-motion, by Marcy P. Lascano, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 2023, pp. 240, £54.00 (hb), ISBN: 9780197651636. [REVIEW]Peter West - forthcoming - British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-5.
    In The Metaphysics of Margaret Cavendish and Anne Conway, Marcy P. Lascano holds up the metaphysical views of two early modern women philosophers alongside one another in order to demonstrate that...
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  22. History and the Self: A Study in the Roots of History and the Relations of History and Ethics.Hilda D. Oakeley - 1934 - Philosophy 9 (35):371-373.
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  23.  29
    Self-mastery and universal history.David James - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (9):932-952.
    Horkheimer and Adorno make claims that imply a complete rejection of the idea of a universal history developed in classical German philosophy. Using Kant’s account of universal history, I argue that some features of the idea of a universal history can nevertheless be detected in the Dialectic of Enlightenment and some of Adorno’s remarks on freedom and history. This is done in connection with the kind of rational self-mastery that they associate with the story (...)
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  24.  3
    The Impertinent Self: A Heroic History of Modernity.Sarah Kirkby (ed.) - 2009 - Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University Press.
    _The Impertinent Self_ provides a philosophical and cultural theory of modernity by constructing a parallel between the philosophical self and the hero figure found in certain cinematic genres. Früchtl argues that modernity is not unified and should be conceived as a phenomenon consisting of three strata: the classical, the agonist, and the hybrid. He demonstrates this by following a dual trajectory: the shift in the concept of the self from German idealism to Romanticism and so-called postmodernism, and the (...)
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  25. History vs. Fiction: The Self-Destruction of The Executioner's Song.Robert L. McLaughlin - 1988 - Clio: A Journal of Literature, History, and the Philosophy of History 17 (3):225-238.
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  26.  6
    Self-Reference and Philosophy.Walter Cerf - 1953 - Proceedings of the XIth International Congress of Philosophy 1:92-98.
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  27.  9
    Philosophy, Society and the Cunning of History in Eastern Europe.Costica Bradatan (ed.) - 2012 - Routledge.
    Philosophy, Society and the Cunning of History in Eastern Europe charts the intellectual landscape of twentieth century East-Central Europe under the unifying theme of 'precariousness' as a mode of historical existence. Caught between empires, often marked by catastrophic historic events and grand political failures, the countries of East-Central Europe have for a long time developed a certain intellectual self-representation, a culture that not only helps them make some sense of such misfortunes, but also protects them somehow from (...)
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  28.  25
    Meanings of History as Permanent Self-Tests of Groups and Societies.Nikolai S. Rozov - 2008 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 38:71-81.
    The analytical and self-critical bias of modern philosophy lets ideology expand to most significant world-view and value areas. Hence, philosophy of history escapes such problems as meaning of history, course of history, and self-identification in history. Ideology aggressively grasps these ideas and transforms them into its own primitive dogmas that usually serve as symbolical tools for political struggle or for legitimating ruling elites. This paper shows how it is possible for philosophy, (...)
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  29. The history and philosophy of taxonomy as an information science.Catherine Kendig & Joeri Witteveen - 2020 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 42 (3):1-9.
    We undeniably live in an information age—as, indeed, did those who lived before us. After all, as the cultural historian Robert Darnton pointed out: ‘every age was an age of information, each in its own way’ (Darnton 2000: 1). Darnton was referring to the news media, but his insight surely also applies to the sciences. The practices of acquiring, storing, labeling, organizing, retrieving, mobilizing, and integrating data about the natural world has always been an enabling aspect of scientific work. Natural (...)
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  30.  93
    Naturalization of the Soul: Self and Personal Identity in the Eighteenth Century.John Barresi & Raymond Martin - 1999 - New York: Routledge. Edited by John Barresi.
    _Naturalization of the Soul_ charts the development of the concepts of soul and self in Western thought, from Plato to the present. It fills an important gap in intellectual history by being the first book to emphasize the enormous intellectual transformation in the eighteenth century, when the religious 'soul' was replaced first by a philosophical 'self' and then by a scientific 'mind'. The authors show that many supposedly contemporary theories of the self were actually discussed in (...)
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  31. Philosophy’s Self-Image.Jay F. Rosenberg - 1982 - Analyse & Kritik 4 (1):114-128.
    Rorty rejects the idea of a "permanent and neutral matrix of Heuristic concepts". The claim of privilege, however, is separable from the aim of universality, and this idea can be transposed into a regulative ideal, while still preserving the unique intellectual mission of a discipline of philosophy. Rorty's own positive picture of "edifying Philosophy" in contrast is arguably irresponsible and grounded in misreadings both of the epistemology of science and of episodes in the history of philosophy, (...)
     
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  32.  7
    What is the self?: a philosophy of psychology.Anita P. Craig - 2005 - Lewiston, N.Y.: Edwin Mellen Press.
    The studies presented here in this work have a central point of departure: it is remarkable that we, as biological organisms in a social world, configure our lives in terms of selves. This book succeeds in brining together different but related disciplines concerned with people and the histories and conditions of their lives. The answer worked out to the central question addressed is thus an optimistic one in that it shows the niche for knowledge of human nature and the texts (...)
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  33.  43
    Feminism and history of philosophy.Genevieve Lloyd (ed.) - 2002 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    This new collection of essays by leading feminist critics highlights the fresh perspectives that feminism can offer to the discussion of past philosophers. Rather than defining itself through opposition to a "male" philosophical tradition, feminist philosophy emerges not only as an exciting new contribution to the history of philosophy, but also as a source of cultural self-understanding in the present.
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  34.  3
    Philosophy of Mind in the Early and High Middle Ages: The History of the Philosophy of Mind.Margaret Cameron (ed.) - 2018 - New York: Routledge.
    Philosophy of Mind in the Early and High Middle Ages provides an outstanding overview to a tumultuous 900-year period of discovery, innovation, and intellectual controversy that began with the Roman senator Boethius and concluded with the Franciscan theologian and philosopher John Duns Scotus. Relatively neglected in philosophy of mind, this volume highlights the importance of philosophers such as Abelard, Duns Scotus, and the Persian philosopher and polymath Avicenna to the history of philosophy of mind. Following an (...)
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  35.  2
    Philosophy, Openness, and the imperative of continuous self-renewal.Pascah Mungwini - 2022 - Filosofia Theoretica: Journal of African Philosophy, Culture and Religions 11 (2):27-42.
    Philosophy premises itself on the ideals of openness and continuous self-renewal. And yet, the story of philosophy has been an endless struggle against the violence of systematic exclusion and erasure. This article deploys the principle of openness as an analytic category to reflect on the broader question of epistemic decolonisation and the imperative this imposes on the practice of philosophy. There are important ontological, epistemological, and ethical dimensions to the principle of openness with a bearing on (...)
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  36.  16
    The Self and the Dramas of History[REVIEW]M. C. - 1955 - Review of Metaphysics 9 (1):162-162.
    Inspired by Martin Buber's I and Thou, the author holds that the self is neither mind nor body, but rather the "I" which engages in dialogues with itself, with its fellows, and with God. Philosophers and scientists are criticized for their "reductionism" with regard to the self, and the Hellenic tendency to view history and the self as "structured artifacts" is rejected. The author calls for renewed allegiance to the Hebraic heritage of Western culture, and for (...)
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  37. Self-reference and type distinctions in Greek philosophy and mathematics.Ioannis M. Vandoulakis - forthcoming - In Jens Lemanski & Ingolf Max (eds.), History of Logic and its Modern Interpretation. College Publications.
    In this paper, we examine a fundamental problem that appears in Greek philosophy: the paradoxes of self-reference of the type of “Third Man” that appears first in Plato’s 'Parmenides', and is further discussed in Aristotle and the Peripatetic commentators and Proclus. We show that the various versions are analysed using different language, reflecting different understandings by Plato and the Platonists, such as Proclus, on the one hand, and the Peripatetics (Aristotle, Alexander, Eudemus), on the other hand. We show (...)
     
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  38.  5
    Hegel: Lectures on the History of Philosophy 1825-6: Volume I: Introduction and Oriental Philosophy.Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel (ed.) - 2009 - New York: Oxford University Press UK.
    This new edition of Hegel's Lectures on the History of Philosophy sets forth clearly, for the first time for the English reader, what Hegel actually said. These lectures challenged the antiquarianism of Hegel's contemporaries by boldly contending that the history of philosophy is itself philosophy, not just history. It portrays the journey of reason or spirit through time, as reason or spirit comes in stages to its full development and self-conscious existence, through the (...)
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  39.  8
    The Making of the Good Person: Self-Help, Ethics and Philosophy.Nora Hämäläinen - 2023 - New York, NY: Routledge.
    This book provides a philosophical assessment of the idea of personhood advanced in popular self-help literature. It also traces, within academic philosophy and philosophical scholarship, a self-help culture where the self is brought forth as an object of improvement and a key to meaning, progress and profundity. Unlike other academic treatments of the topic of self-help, this book is not primarily concerned with providing a critique of popular self-help and self-transformative practices. Rather, it (...)
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  40.  46
    Philosophy and History.A. Robert Caponigri - 1949 - Review of Metaphysics 3 (2):119 - 136.
    The theoretical problems of historiography derive chiefly from an ambiguity at the heart of the historian's task; historiography is uncertain as to its own theoretical character, that is, its character and status as a mode of knowing. On the one hand, historiography is oriented wholly toward the concrete, toward its rich and inexhaustible determination in quality; moreover, the concrete toward which it is oriented, is not statuesque, substantively plural and fixed, but fluid, dynamic, continuous. Such concretion can be fixed and (...)
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  41.  70
    Self‐Images and “Perspicuous Representations”: Reflection, Philosophy, and the Glass Mirror.Anna Mudde - 2015 - Metaphilosophy 46 (4-5):539-554.
    Reflection names the central activity of Western philosophical practice; the mirror and its attendant metaphors of reflection are omnipresent in the self-image of Western philosophy and in metaphilosophical reflection on reflection. But the physical experiences of being reflected by glass mirrors have been inadequately theorized contributors to those metaphors, and this has implications not only for the self-image and the self of philosophy but also for metaphilosophical practice. This article begins to rethink the metaphor of (...)
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  42. Baffioni, Carmela (ed.) On Logic: An Arabic Critical Edition and English Translation of EPISTLES 10-14 (Epistles of the Brethren of Purity). [REVIEW]Simon Blackburn, Andreas Blank, Christopher Bobonich, S. ‘Laws’ Plato, Luca Castagnoli & Ancient Self-Refutation - 2011 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 19 (2):357-359.
     
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  43.  25
    Self-Consciousness and the Philosophy of Mind.Dieter Sturma - 1995 - Proceedings of the Eighth International Kant Congress 1:661-674.
  44.  35
    Indigenous peoples tribal self government: Legal history and public policy manifestations in canada, new zealand and the united states.Michael Lane - unknown
    Contemporary notions of what constitutes tribal self government for Indigenous Peoples in the legal systems of the nation-states Canada, New Zealand and the United States of America have their origins in philosophies and theories developed by European nation-states generally, in relation to their colonial expansion into what is now called the Americas. This thesis examines the nature of these theories, and how they have formed the basis for legal precedent and public policy in the three nation-states. A representative analysis (...)
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  45. A few moments of the debate on the theories of" non-self" and the" two truths" in the history of buddhist philosophy.Giuseppe Ferraro - 2011 - Kriterion: Journal of Philosophy 52 (123):7-29.
     
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  46.  3
    Moral Philosophy in Eighteenth-Century Britain: God, Self, and Other.Colin Heydt - 2017 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    The long eighteenth century is a crucial period in the history of ethics, when our moral relations to God, ourselves and others were minutely examined and our duties, rights and virtues systematically and powerfully presented. Colin Heydt charts the history of practical morality - what we ought to do and to be - from the 1670s, when practical ethics arising from Protestant natural law gained an institutional foothold in England, to early British responses to the French Revolution around (...)
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  47.  26
    Self-Love, Egoism, and the Selfish Hypothesis: Key Debates in Eighteenth-Century British Moral Philosophy by Christian Maurer.Aaron Garrett - 2021 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 59 (1):150-151.
    Self-love was a pivotal topic of debate for moral philosophers in the first half of the eighteenth century. But, as was also the case for related concepts like sociability and virtue, philosophers meant many different things by ‘self-love.’ The historians of philosophy who discuss self-love often do as well. A great virtue of Christian Maurer’s Self-Love, Egoism, and the Selfish Hypothesis is to disambiguate five senses of self-love in eighteenth-century discussions. ‘Self-love’ and its (...)
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  48.  32
    Self-interest and public interest in shaftesbury's philosophy.Stanley Grean - 1964 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 2 (1):37-45.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Self-Interest and Public Interest m Shaftesbury's Philosophy STANLEY GREAN THE SEV~NTEENTrt-CV.NTVRYproblem of the relationship of self-interest and public interest was carried over by the third Earl of Shaftesbury into the eighteenth century where it became a major issue for generations of British moralists. His own preoccupation with the problem began at an early date in his career, for the lnquiry Concerning Virtue or Merit (1699), the (...)
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  49.  25
    An alternative social history of the self.Michael Carrithers - 1985 - In Michael Carrithers, Steven Collins & Steven Lukes (eds.), The Category of the Person: Anthropology, Philosophy, History. Cambridge University Press. pp. 234--256.
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  50. Philosophy of History as the History of Philosophy in Schelling’s System of Transcendental Idealism.Jeffrey Bernstein - 2004 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 8 (2):233-254.
    Schelling’s System of Transcendental Idealism is usually considered to be either (1) an early Fichtean-influenced work that gives little insight into Schelling’s philosophy or (2) a text focusing on self-consciousness and aesthetics. I argue that Schelling’s System develops a subtle conception of history which originates in a dialogue with Kant and Hegel (concerning the question of teleology) and concludes in proximity to an Idealist version of Spinoza. In this way, Schelling develops a philosophy of history (...)
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