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  1. Mitchell Aboulafia (2011). Through the Eyes of Mad Men: Simulation, Interaction, and Ethics. European Journal of Pragmatism and American Philosophy (2):133-147.
    Traditionally pragmatists have been favorably disposed to improving our understanding of agency and ethics through the use of empirical research. In the last two decades simulation theory has been championed in certain cognitive science circles as a way of explaining how we attribute mental states and predict human behavior. Drawing on research in psychology and neuroscience, Alvin I. Goldman and Robert M. Gordon have not only used simulation theory to discuss how we “mindread”, but have suggested that the theory has (...)
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  2. Alia Al-Saji (2009). A Phenomenology of Critical-Ethical Vision: Merleau-Ponty, Bergson, and the Question of Seeing Differently. Chiasmi International 11:375-398.
    Drawing on Merleau-Ponty’s “Eye and Mind” and Bergson’s Matière et mémoire and “La perception du changement,” I ask what resources are available in vision for interrupting objectifying habits of seeing. While both Bergson and Merleau-Ponty locate the possibility of seeing differently in the figure of the painter, I develop by means of their texts, and in dialogue with Iris Marion Young’s work, a more general phenomenology of hesitation that grounds what I am calling “critical-ethical vision.” Hesitation, I argue, stems from (...)
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  3. Alia Al-Saji (2006). Vision, Mirror and Expression: The Genesis of the Ethical Body in Merleau-Ponty’s Later Works. In James Hatley, Janice McLane & Christian Diehm (eds.), Interrogating Ethics: Embodying the Good in Merleau-Ponty. Duquesne University Press.
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  4. Erik Baldwin (2012). Religious Dogma Without Religious Fundamentalism. Journal of Social Science 8 (1):85-90.
    New Atheists and Anti-Theists (such as Richard Dawkins, Daniel Dennett, Sam Harris, Christopher Hutchins) affirm that there is a strong connection between being a traditional theist and being a religious fundamentalist who advocates violence, terrorism, and war. They are especially critical of Islam. On the contrary, I argue that, when correctly understood, religious dogmatic belief, present in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, is progressive and open to internal and external criticism and revision. Moreover, acknowledging that human knowledge is finite and that (...)
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  5. Peter Brian Barry, Evil Actions, Evildoers, and Evil People.
    Typically, philosophers interested in evil have typically been concerned with reconciling (or not) the apparent existence of gratuitous suffering with the existence of an omnipotent and omniscient and supremely loving and caring Deity. Undeniably, ‘evil’ functions as a mass noun: note the intelligibility of asking “Why is there so much evil in the world?” But ‘evil’ sometimes functions as an adjective and is used variously to describe persons, actions, desires, motives, and intentions; Joel Feinberg even speaks of “evil smells.” In (...)
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  6. Peter Brian Barry (2011). Saving Strawson: Evil and Strawsonian Accounts of Moral Responsibility. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 14 (1):5-21.
    Almost everyone allows that conditions can obtain that exempt agents from moral responsibility—that someone is not a morally responsible agent if certain conditions obtain. In his seminal Freedom and Resentment, Peter Strawson denies that the truth of determinism globally exempts agents from moral responsibility. As has been noted elsewhere, Strawson appears committed to the surprising thesis that being an evil person is an exempting condition. Less often noted is the fact that various Strawsonians—philosophers sympathetic with Strawson’s account of moral responsibility—at (...)
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  7. Peter Brian Barry (2011). Wickedness Redux. Philo 14 (2):137-160.
    Some philosophers have argued that the concepts of evil and wickedness cannot be well grasped by those inclined to a naturalist bent, perhaps because evil is so intimately tied to religious discourse or because it is ultimately not possible to understand evil, period. By contrast, I argue that evil—or, at least, what it is to be an evil person—can be understood by naturalist philosophers, and I articulate an independently plausible account of evil character.
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  8. Peter Brian Barry (2010). Extremity of Vice and the Character of Evil. Journal of Philosophical Research 35:25-42.
    It is plausible that being an evil person is a matter of having a particularly morally depraved character. I argue that suffering from extreme moral vices—and not consistently lacking moral vices, for example—suffices for being evil. Alternatively, I defend an extremity account concerning evil personhood against consistency accounts of evil personhood. After clarifying what it is for vices to be extreme, I note that the extremity thesis I defend allows that a person could suffer from both extremely vicious character traits (...)
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  9. Erica Benner (2009). Machiavelli's Ethics. Princeton University Press.
    Benner, Erica. Machiavelli’s Ethics. Princeton, 2009. 527p bibl index afp; ISBN 9780691141763, $75.00; ISBN 9780691141770 pbk, $35.00.

    Reviewed in CHOICE, April 2010

    This major new study of Machiavelli’s moral and political philosophy by Benner (Yale) argues that most readings of Machiavelli suffer from a failure to appreciate his debt to Greek sources, particularly the Socratic tradition of moral and political philosophy. Benner argues that when read in the light of his Greek sources, Machiavelli appears as much less the immoralist or sophist (...)
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  10. Lorraine Besser-jones (2008). Social Psychology, Moral Character, and Moral Fallibility. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 76 (2):310–332.
    In recent years, there has been considerable debate in the literature concerning the existence of moral character. One lesson we should take away from these debates is that the concept of character, and the role it plays in guiding our actions, is far more complex than most of us initially took it to be. Just as Gilbert Harman, for example, makes a serious mistake in insisting, plainly and simply, that ther is no such thing as character, defenders of character also (...)
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  11. J. S. Blumenthal-Barby (2012). Seeking Better Health Care Outcomes: The Ethics of Using the “Nudge”. American Journal of Bioethics 12 (2):1-10.
    Policymakers, employers, insurance companies, researchers, and health care providers have developed an increasing interest in using principles from behavioral economics and psychology to persuade people to change their health-related behaviors, lifestyles, and habits. In this article, we examine how principles from behavioral economics and psychology are being used to nudge people (the public, patients, or health care providers) toward particular decisions or behaviors related to health or health care, and we identify the ethically relevant dimensions that should be considered for (...)
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  12. Ruth Chang (2005). Parity, Interval Value, and Choice. Ethics 115 (2):331-350.
    This paper begins with a response to Josh Gert’s challenge that ‘on a par with’ is not a sui generis fourth value relation beyond ‘better than’, ‘worse than’, and ‘equally good’. It then explores two further questions: can parity be modeled by an interval representation of value? And what should one rationally do when faced with items on a par? I argue that an interval representation of value is incompatible with the possibility that items are on a par (a mathematical (...)
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  13. Andrew J. Corsa (2013). Thomas Hobbes: Magnanimity, Felicity, and Justice. Hobbes Studies 26 (2):130-151.
    Thomas Hobbes’s concept of magnanimity, a descendant of Aristotle’s “greatness of soul,” plays a key role in Hobbes’s theory with respect to felicity and the virtue of justice. In his Critique du ‘De Mundo’, Hobbes implies that only genuinely magnanimous people can achieve the greatest felicity in their lives. A life of felicity is a life of pleasure, where the only pleasure that counts is the well grounded glory experienced by those who are magnanimous. Hobbes suggests that felicity involves the (...)
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  14. Mark Anthony Dacela (2008). Peter H. Spader: Scheller's Ethical Personalism: It's Logic, Development, and Promise. [REVIEW] Philosophia 37 (1).
    Spader identifies and addresses in this work three enigmas that continue to overshadow the merits of Scheler's ethical personalism (9-10): (a) the lack of phenomenological evidences, (b) the sudden change of path from ethics to religion and metaphysics, and (c) the movement from theism to panentheism. Spader's book is thus an attempt to rid Scheler's ethical theory of its illusive reputation by making explicit the rationale behind the obscurities that Scheler seems to have intentionally embraced.
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  15. Hermann Deuser & Dennis Beach (1993). Christianity—Sign Among Signs? Journal of Speculative Philosophy 7 (4):286 - 297.
    The author uses Eco's The Name of the Rose to pose the problem of the relation between the infinite aesthetic play of semiotics and pragmatic moral responsibility for human conduct. This problem is addressed through Peirce's semiotic theory, which not only links signs to objects, but situates them in an interpretant relation that is formative of human conduct. Religion is advanced as the paradigm of this relation; a "categorial semiotic" where concrete symbolic acts move beyond nominalism through real experience of (...)
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  16. Ulrich Diehl (2010). Neidüberwindung als Problem der philosophischen Lebenskunst. In B. Harress (ed.), Neid. Darstellung und Deutung in den Wissenschaften und Künsten. LIST.
    Der Neid wirft als Thema der philosophischen und psychologischen Reflexion eine ganze Reihe von Fragen auf, die theoretischer Natur sind. Dazu gehören die Frage nach der Analyse des alltagspsychologischen Neidbegriffes, die damit verbundene Frage nach der Abgrenzung des psychologischen Phänomens des Neides im Verhältnis zu verwandten Emotionen, wie z.B. Eifersucht, Habgier, Ehrgeiz, Wetteifer, Geiz, etc., die Frage nach dem Wesen des Neides als einem reflexartigen und unkontrollierbaren Affekt, als einer dauerhaften und unbewussten Stimmung, als einem momentanen, intentionalen und bewussten Gefühl, (...)
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  17. Ulrich Diehl (2010). Neid als Mangel an gelingendem Selbstsein. In B. Harress (ed.), Neid. Darstellung un Deutung in den Wissenschaften und Künsten. LIST.
    Neidische Gedanken, neidische Gefühle, neidische Menschen sind im alltäglichen Leben gegenwärtig. Kaum vergeht ein Tag, an dem man nicht mit dem Phänomen des Neides konfrontiert wäre. Bei sich selbst mag man ihn schon gar nicht, denn der Neid ist ein schmerzliches und unschönes Gefühl. Obwohl der Neid ein alltägliches Phänomen ist, bleibt er im Alltag ein weitgehend tabuisiertes Thema: Über den Neid spricht man entweder gar nicht oder nur selten. Falls man doch über den Neid spricht, dann zumeist über den (...)
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  18. David Forman (2012). Kant on Moral Freedom and Moral Slavery. Kantian Review 17 (1):1-32.
    Kant’s account of the freedom gained through virtue builds on the Socratic tradition. On the Socratic view, when morality is our end, nothing can hinder us from attaining satisfaction: we are self-sufficient and free since moral goodness is (as Kant says) “created by us, hence is in our power.” But when our end is the fulfillment of sensible desires, our satisfaction requires luck as well as the cooperation of others. For Kant, this means that happiness requires that we get other (...)
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  19. Joseph S. Fulda (2013). The Illiberal Fruits of Corruption. The St. Croix Review 46 (4):58-63.
    Article interrelating /de facto/ bribery, public corruption, the disconnect between private life and public life, the disconnect between logic, on the one hand, and politics and ethics, on the other, and the four rationales for the exclusionary rules (in law), using New York City as a case study.
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  20. Joseph S. Fulda (2007). The Ethics of Pseudonymous Publication. Journal of Information Ethics 16 (2):75-89.
    This article explores the ethics of pseudonymous publication of nonfiction by examining what and why an author might hide behind the veil of pseudonymity, when this is and is not appropriate, and when it is deemed appropriate what measures should be taken to ensure accountability despite the veil. The argument begins by assuming that the sole duty an author has qua author is to his audience and centers on issues in both ethics and philosophy of language.
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  21. Jens Johansson (2010). Being and Betterness. Utilitas 22 (3):285-302.
    In this article I discuss the question of whether a person’s existence can be better (or worse) for him than his non-existence. Recently, Nils Holtug and Melinda A. Roberts have defended an affirmative answer. These defenses, I shall argue, do not succeed. In different ways, Holtug and Roberts have got the metaphysics and axiology wrong. However, I also argue that a person’s existence can after all be better (or worse) for him than his non-existence, though for reasons other than those (...)
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  22. Eugene Kelly (2011). Material Ethics of Value: Max Scheler and Nicolai Hartmann. Springer.
    This volume demonstrates that their contributions to a material ethics of value are complementary: by supplementing the work of one with that of the other, we obtain a comprehensive and defensible axiological and moral theory.
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  23. Eugene Kelly (2008). Material Value-Ethics: Max Scheler and Nicolai Hartmann. Philosophy Compass 3 (1):1-16.
  24. Eva Kittay (forthcoming). DEPENDENCY. In Rachel Adams (ed.), KEYWORDS IN DISABILITY STUDIES. NYU PRESS.
    Dependency is a keyword in disability studies. The article reviews the negative force of the term and why disability researchers and activists have made the case for the independence of disabled people. But dependency, I claim, is a feature of any human life and I argue that disability studies needs to neutralize the term and appropriate dependency as that which binds people, regardless of their abilities or disabilities. I argue that we can acknowledge dependency and work toward an ideal of (...)
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  25. Hallvard Lillehammer (forthcoming). Minding Your Own Business? Understanding Indifference as a Virtue. Philosophical Perspectives 28.
    Indifference is sometimes described as a virtue. Yet who is indifferent; to what; and in what way is poorly understood, and frequently subject to controversy and confusion. This paper proposes a framework for the interpretation and analysis of ethically acceptable forms of indifference in terms of how different states of indifference can be either more or less dynamic, or more or less sensitive to the nature and state of their object.
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  26. Michelle Mason (forthcoming). Reactivity and Refuge. In David Shoemaker (ed.), Oxford Studies in Agency and Responsibility. Oxford University Press. 143-162.
    P.F. Strawson famously suggested that employment of the objective attitude in an intimate relationship forebodes the relationship’s demise. Relatively less remarked is Strawson's admission that the objective attitude is available as a refuge from the strains of relating to normal, mature adults as proper subjects of the reactive attitudes. I develop an account of the strategic employment of the objective attitude in such cases according to which it denies a person a power of will – authorial power – whose recognition (...)
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  27. Tom McClelland (2013). Review of Mark Rowlands, Can Animals Be Moral? [REVIEW] Metapsychology Online 17 (29).
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  28. Donovan Miyasaki, (2009) Can Nietzsche's Noble Be Moral and Just?
    Nietzsche implicitly endorses a positive value system grounded in his concept of the will to power, a “noble” alternative to the “slavish” and life-denying values that he believes characterize modern European morality. His own power-affirming value system is usually presented amorally: as an alternative to morality, rather than as a competing morality. Most commentators believe this is necessarily so: because Nietzsche founds his values in the affirmation of power, they are incompatible with the concern for the well-being of others that (...)
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  29. Olaf L. Müller (2005). Benign Blackmail. Cassandra's Plan or What Is Terrorism? In Georg Meggle (ed.), Ethics of Terrorism and Counter-Terrorism. Ontos.
    In its reaction on the terroristic attacks of September 9th, 2001, the US-government threatened Afghanistan's Taleban with war in order to force them to extradite terrorist leader Bin Laden; the Taleban said that they would not surrender to this kind of blackmail – and so, they were removed from Kabul by means of military force. The rivalling versions of this story depend crucially on notions such as "terrorism" and "blackmail". Obviously you'll gain public support for your preferrend version of the (...)
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  30. Jin Y. Park (2013). Ethics of Tension: A Buddhist-Postmodern Ethical Paradigm. Taiwan Journal of East Asian Studies 10 (19):123-142.
    This essay considers an ethical paradigm that can be drawn from Buddhist and postmodern philosophy. Ethics is a practical branch of philosophy and an ethical paradigm is closely connected to the fundamental structure and tenets of a philosophical system. That ethics is a practical branch of philosophy also indicates that meaning and value of a certain ethical paradigm is directly related to the environments in which the paradigm is understood and practiced. In considering an ethical paradigm based on Buddhist and (...)
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  31. Jin Y. Park (2013). Ethics of Tension: A Buddhist-Postmodern Ethical Paradigm. Taiwan Journal of East Asian Studies 10 (19):123-142.
    This essay considers an ethical paradigm that can be drawn from Buddhist and postmodern philosophy. Ethics is a practical branch of philosophy and an ethical paradigm is closely connected to the fundamental structure and tenets of a philosophical system. That ethics is a practical branch of philosophy also indicates that meaning and value of a certain ethical paradigm is directly related to the environments in which the paradigm is understood and practiced. In considering an ethical paradigm based on Buddhist and (...)
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  32. Glen Pettigrove (2010). I Was Wrong. Social Theory and Practice 36 (2):355-362.
    In I Was Wrong, Nick Smith explores a number of factors that contribute to our evaluation of apologies as being better or worse, adequate or inadequate. After discussing some of the strengths of Smith's account, I consider some of its limitations. In particular, I draw attention to a number of qualities that contribute to our normative assessment of apologies but that have been neglected by recent discussions of the ethics of apologizing.
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  33. Glen Pettigrove (2008). The Dilemma of Divine Forgiveness. Religious Studies 44 (4):457-464.
    The dilemma of divine forgiveness suggests it is unreasonable to be comforted by the thought that God forgives acts that injure human victims. A plausible response to the dilemma suggests that the comfort derives from the belief that God’s forgiveness releases the wrongdoer from punishment for her misdeed. This response is shown to be flawed. A more adequate response is then developed out of the connection between forgiveness and reconciliation.
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  34. Glen Pettigrove (2007). Hume on Forgiveness and the Unforgivable. Utilitas 19 (4):447-465.
    Are torture and torturers unforgivable? The article examines this question in the light of a Humean account of forgiveness. Initially, the Humean account appears to suggest that torturers are unforgivable. However, in the end, I argue it provides us with good reasons to think that even torturers may be forgiven.
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  35. Glen Pettigrove (2007). Forgiveness and Interpretation. Journal of Religious Ethics 35 (3):429 - 452.
    This paper explores the relationship between our interpretations of another's actions and our readiness to forgive. It begins by articulating an account of forgiveness drawn from the New Testament. It then employs the work of Schleiermacher, Dilthey, and Gadamer to investigate ways in which our interpretations of an act or agent can promote or prevent such forgiveness. It concludes with a discussion of some ethical restrictions that may pertain to the interpretation of actions or agents as opposed to utterances and (...)
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  36. Glen Pettigrove (2007). Understanding, Excusing, Forgiving. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 74 (1):156–175.
    This paper explores the relation between understanding and forgiving. A number of people have argued against the old adage that to understand is to forgive, for in many instances understanding leads to excusing rather than forgiving. Nonetheless, there is an interesting connection to be found between forgiving and understanding. I identify three ways in which understanding can lead to forgiveness ofunexcused wrongdoing: It can do so by changing our interpretation of the actor, by changing our interpretation of the action, and (...)
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  37. Glen Pettigrove (2004). The Forgiveness We Speak: The Illocutionary Force of Forgiving. Southern Journal of Philosophy 42 (3):371-392.
    What are we doing when we say "I forgive you"? This paper employs Austin's notion of illocutionary force to analyze three different kinds of acts in which we might engage when saying "I forgive you." We might use it (1) to disclose an emotional condition, (2) to declare a debt cancelled, or (3) to commit ourselves to a future course of action. I suggest that the forgiving utterances we seek possess qualities of both the first and the third types of (...)
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  38. Glen Pettigrove & Michael Meyer (2009). Moral Ambition. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 87 (2):285-299.
    The paper opens with an account of moral ambition which, it argues, is both a coherent ideal and an admirable trait. It closes with a discussion of some of the ways in which this trait might differ from traditional virtues such as temperance, courage, or benevolence.
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  39. David Shoemaker, Personal Identity and Ethics. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    What justifies our holding a <span class='Hi'>person</span> morally responsible for some past action? Why am I justified in having a special prudential concern for some future persons and not others? Why do many of us think that maximizing the good within a single life is perfectly acceptable, but maximizing the good across lives is wrong? In these and other normative questions, it looks like any answer we come up with will have to make an essential reference to personal identity. So, (...)
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  40. Tamler Sommers (forthcoming). Partial Desert. In David Shoemaker (ed.), Oxford Studies in Agency and Responsibility. Oxford University Press.
    Theories of moral desert focus only on the personal culpability of the agent to determine the amount of blame and punishment the agent deserves. I defend an alternative account of desert, one that does not focus only facts about offenders and their offenses. In this revised framework, personal culpability can do no more than set upper and lower limits for deserved blame and punishment. For more precise judgments within that spectrum, additional factors must be considered, factors that are independent of (...)
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  41. Sergio Tenenbaum (2014). The Perils of Earnest Consequentializing. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 88 (1):233-240.
  42. Mark van Roojen (2013). Scanlon's Promising Proposal and the Righ Kind of Reasons to Believe. In Mark Timmons (ed.), Oxford Studies in Normative Ethics, Volume 3. 59-78.
    T. M. Scanlon suggests that the binding nature of promises itself plays a role in allowing a promisee rationally to expect follow through even while that binding nature itself depends on the promisee’s rational expectation of follow through. Kolodny and Wallace object that this makes the account viciously circular. The chapter defends Scanlon’s theory from this objection. It argues that the basic complaint is a form of wrong kinds of reason objection. The thought is that the promisee’s reason to expect (...)
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  43. Shannon Winnubst (2006). What If the Law is Written in a Porno Book? Symposium: The Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy 10 (1):103-115.
  44. Jason Wyckoff (2013). Is the Concept of Violence Normative? Revue Internationale de Philosophie 67 (3):337-352.
    Legitimist definitions of 'violence' are those that make explicit reference to the illegality, illegitimacy, or wrongfulness of the acts classified as acts of violence. All acts of violence, according to the legitimist definitions, involve a violation of some kind. I defend the view that legitimist definitions are defective—that notions like “wrongness” and “violation” are not part of the concept of violence. I offer three lines of argument: (1) that legitimist definitions of “violence” reduce the doctrine of nonviolence to a trivial (...)
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  45. Edoardo Zamuner, David K. Levy & Valentina di Lascio (2007). Ludwig Wittgenstein's Lecture on Ethics. Introduction, Interpretation and Complete Text. Quodlibet.
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