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  1. Alia Al-Saji (2004). The Memory of Another Past: Bergson, Deleuze and a New Theory of Time. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 37 (2):203-239.
    Through the philosophies of Bergson and Deleuze, my paper explores a different theory of time. I reconstitute Deleuze’s paradoxes of the past in Difference and Repetition and Bergsonism to reveal a theory of time in which the relation between past and present is one of coexistence rather than succession. The theory of memory implied here is a non-representational one. To elaborate this theory, I ask: what is the role of the “virtual image” in Bergson’s Matter and Memory? Far from representing (...)
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  2. Jan Almäng (2012). Time, Mode and Perceptual Content. Acta Analytica 27 (4):425-439.
    Francois Recanati has recently argued that each perceptual state has two distinct kinds of content, complete and explicit content. According to Recanati, the former is a function of the latter and the psychological mode of perception. Furthermore, he has argued that explicit content is temporally neutral and that time-consciousness is a feature of psychological mode. In this paper it is argued, pace Recanati, that explicit content is not temporally neutral. Recanati’s position is initially presented. Three desiderata for a theory of (...)
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  3. Holly Andersen (2014). The Development of the ‘Specious Present’ and James’ Views on Temporal Experience. In Dan Lloyd Valtteri Arstila (ed.), Subjective Time: the philosophy, psychology, and neuroscience of temporality. MIT Press. 25-42.
    This chapter examines the philosophical discussion concerning the relationship between time, memory, attention, and consciousness, from Locke through the Scottish Common Sense tradition, in terms of its influence on James' development of the specious present doctrine. The specious present doctrine is the view that the present moment in experience is non punctate, but instead comprises some nonzero amount of time; it contrasts with the mathematical view of the present, in which the divide between past and future is merely a point (...)
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  4. Jose M. Arcaya (1991). Making Time for Memory: A Transcendental Approach. Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 11 (2):75-90.
  5. Jose M. Arcaya (1989). Memory and Temporality: A Phenomenological Alternative. Philosophical Psychology 2 (1):101-110.
    The notion of memory storage, central to most contemporary theories of remembering, is challenged from a philosophical perspective as being contradictory and untenable. It criticizes this storage hypothesis as relying upon a linear explanation of time, an assumption which results in infinite regression, solipsism, and a failure to contact the real past. A model based on the phenomenological viewpoints of Edmund Husserl and Maurice Merleau-Ponty is offered as an alternative paradigm. Finally, a research method suggested by this descriptive approach to (...)
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  6. Henri Bergson (1991/2004). Matter and Memory. MIT Press.
    A monumental work by an important modern philosopher, Matter and Memory (1896) represents one of the great inquiries into perception and memory, movement and time, matter and mind. Nobel Prize-winner Henri Bergson surveys these independent but related spheres, exploring the connection of mind and body to individual freedom of choice. Bergson’s efforts to reconcile the facts of biology to a theory of consciousness offered a challenge to the mechanistic view of nature, and his original and innovative views exercised a profound (...)
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  7. Richard A. Block (1996). Psychological Time and Memory Systems of the Brain. In J. T. Fraser & M. Soulsby (eds.), Dimensions of Time and Life: The Study of Time. , Volume 8.
  8. John Campbell (2001). Memory Demonstratives. In Christoph Hoerl & Teresa McCormark (eds.), Time and Memory. Oxford University Press. 177--194.
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  9. John Campbell (1997). The Realism of Memory. In Richard G. Heck (ed.), Language, Thought, and Logic: Essays in Honour of Michael Dummett. Oxford University Press.
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  10. Edward S. Casey (1979). Perceiving and Remembering. Review of Metaphysics 32 (March):407-436.
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  11. Daniel C. Dennett (1995). Is Perception the "Leading Edge" of Memory? In A. Spafadora (ed.), Iride: Luoghi Della Memoria E Dell'oblio.
    Daniel C. Dennett Is Perception the 'Leading Edge' of Memory? Consciousness appears to us to consist of a sequence of contentful items, arranged in a sequence, the so-called "stream of consciousness," in which each item in turn bursts quite suddenly into consciousness and thereby enters memory, perhaps only briefly to be remembered, and then forgotten. I think that hidden in this comfortable and largely innocent picture of consciousness is a deep and seductive mistake. I intend to expose and elucidate that (...)
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  12. Jordi Fernandez (2008). Memory and Time. Philosophical Studies 141 (3):333 - 356.
    The purpose of this essay is to clarify the notion of mnemonic content. Memories have content. However, it is not clear whether memories are about past events in the world, past states of our own minds, or some combination of those two elements. I suggest that any proposal about mnemonic content should help us understand why events are presented to us in memory as being in the past. I discuss three proposals about mnemonic content and, eventually, I put forward a (...)
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  13. J. T. Fraser & Nathaniel M. Lawrence (eds.) (1975). The Study of Time II. Springer-Verlag.
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  14. J. T. Fraser & M. Soulsby (eds.) (1996). Dimensions of Time and Life: The Study of Time. , Volume 8.
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  15. E. A. Grosz (ed.) (1999). Becomings: Explorations in Time, Memory, and Futures. Cornell University Press.
    Although the equally pervasive and abstract concept of space has generated a vast body of disciplines, time, and the related idea of "becoming" (transforming, ...
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  16. Pete A. Y. Gunter (2008). Perception, Memory, and Duration: The Binding Problem and the Synthesis of the Past. World Futures 64 (2):125 – 132.
    Theories of perception and of memory are closely allied. The binding problem (which considers how bits of perception are reassembled by the brain) leads to neurophysiological subjectivism. This could be outflanked by arguing with Bergson that perceiving consciousness is out in the world. Thus the brain would bind only behavioral “maps.” In turn, consciousness would retain our personal pasts. Such personal (episodic) memories both help us to recognize present objects and to perform creative acts. Memory, although retentive, is also creative. (...)
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  17. Christoph Hoerl & Teresa McCormack (2001). Perspectives on Time and Memory: An Introduction. In Christoph Hoerl & Teresa McCormack (eds.), Time and memory: Issues in Philosophy and Psychology. Oxford University Press. 1--33.
    What is the connection between the way we represent time and things in time, on the one hand, and our capacity to remember particular past events, on the other? This is the substantive question that has stood behind the project of putting together this volume. The methodological assumption that has informed this project is that any progress with the difficult and fascinating set of issues that are raised by this question must draw on the resources of various areas both in (...)
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  18. Christoph Hoerl & Teresa McCormack (eds.) (2001). Time and Memory: Philosophical Perspectives. Oxford University Press.
  19. Christoph Hoerl & Teresa McCormack (eds.) (2001). Time and Memory: Issues in Philosophy and Psychology. Oxford University Press.
    Time and Memory throws new light on fundamental aspects of human cognition and consciousness by bringing together, for the first time, psychological and philosophical approaches dealing with the connection between the capacity to represent and think about time, and the capacity to recollect the past. Fifteen specially written essays offer insights into current theories of memory processes and of the mechanisms and cognitive abilities underlying temporal judgements, and draw out key issues concerning the phenomenology and epistemology of memory and its (...)
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  20. Louise Hull (2004). Time and Memory. Issues in Philosophy and Psychology. [REVIEW] Australasian Journal of Philosophy 82 (2):363 – 364.
    Book Information Time and Memory: Issues in Philosophy and Psychology. Time and Memory: Issues in Philosophy and Psychology Christoph Hoerl and McCormack Teresa , eds., Oxford: Clarendon Press , 2001 , xiii + 419 , £45 ( cloth ), £17.99 ( paper ) Edited by Christoph Hoerl; and McCormack Teresa . Oxford: Clarendon Press. Pp. xiii + 419. £45 (cloth:), £17.99 (paper:).
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  21. Edmund G. Husserl (1991). On the Phenomenology of the Consciousness of Internal Time (1893-1917). Translated by John Barnett Brough. Dordrecht: Kluwer.
  22. Jenann Ismael, Memory.
    In the general project of trying to reconcile the subjective view of the world (how things seem from the perspective of the embedded agent) with the objective view (the view of the world from the outside, as represented, for example, in our best physics), analytic philosophy, especially in recent years, has been almost solely focused on sensory phenomenology.1 There are two very salient features of the subjective view that haven’t been explored even on the descriptive side but that present prima (...)
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  23. Michael R. Kelly (2004). On the Mind's Pronouncement of Time. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 78:247-262.
    This essay contests the standard historical comparison that links Husserl’s account of time-consciousness to the tradition by way of Book XI of Augustine’sConfessions. This comparison rests on the mistaken assumption that both thinkers attribute the soul’s distention and corresponding apprehension of time to memory. While true for Augustine and Husserl’s 1905 lectures on time, Husserl concluded after 1907 that these lectures advanced the flawed and counter-intuitive position that memory extends perception. I will trace the shortcomings of Augustine’s and Husserl’s conflation (...)
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  24. Sean D. Kelly (forthcoming). Time and Experience. In A. Brooks & Kathleen Akins (eds.), Philosophy and the Neurosciences. Cambridge.
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  25. Sean D. Kelly (2005). Temporal Awareness. In David Woodruff Smith & Amie L. Thomasson (eds.), Phenomenology and Philosophy of Mind. Oxford: Clarendon Press.
  26. Julian Kiverstein (2010). Making Sense of Phenomenal Unity: An Intentionalist Account of Temporal Experience. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 85 (67):155-181.
    Our perceptual experiences stretch across time to present us with movement, persistence and change. How is this possible given that perceptual experiences take place in the present that has no duration? In this paper I argue that this problem is one and the same as the problem of accounting for how our experiences occurring at different times can be phenomenally unified over time so that events occurring at different times can be experienced together. Any adequate account of temporal experience must (...)
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  27. Stan Klein (2013). The Complex Act of Projecting Oneself Into the Future. WIREs Cognitive Science 4:63-79.
    Research on future-oriented mental time travel (FMTT) is highly active yet somewhat unruly. I believe this is due, in large part, to the complexity of both the tasks used to test FMTT and the concepts involved. Extraordinary care is a necessity when grappling with such complex and perplexing metaphysical constructs as self and time and their co-instantiation in memory. In this review, I first discuss the relation between future mental time travel and types of memory (episodic and semantic). I then (...)
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  28. Steinar Kvale (1974). The Temporality of Memory. Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 5 (1):7-31.
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  29. Teresa McCormack (1999). Temporal Concepts and Episodic Memory: A Response to Hoerl. Mind and Language 14 (2):252-262.
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  30. Bjorn Merker (2007). Memory, Imagination, and the Asymmetry Between Past and Future. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (3):325-326.
    A number of difficulties encumber the Suddendorf & Corballis (S&C) proposal regarding mental time travel into the future. Among these are conceptual issues turning on the inherent asymmetry of time and causality with regard to past and future, and the bearing of such asymmetry on the uses and utility of retrospective versus prospective mental time travel, on which I comment.
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  31. John A. Michon (1975). Time Experience and Memory Processes. In J. T. Fraser & Nathaniel M. Lawrence (eds.), The Study of Time Ii. Springer-Verlag.
    The experience of time, and more particularly of duration, has been studied rather separately from its functional fundament: the memory process. Yet, in the past few years some rather intriguing patterns of connection have emerged. Especially the effect of the usual distinction between immediate memory (IM), short term memory (STM) and long term memory (LTM) (Shiffrin and Atkinson 1969; Norman 1970) seems to provide some conceptual cement to link the two fields: time and memory.
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  32. Gregory Nixon (ed.) (2010). Time & Consciousness: Two Faces of One Mystery. QuantumDream, Inc..
    In what follows, I suggest that, against most theories of time, there really is an actual present, a now, but that such an eternal moment cannot be found before or after time. It may even be semantically incoherent to say that such an eternal present exists since “it” is changeless and formless (presumably a dynamic chaos without location or duration) yet with creative potential. Such a field of near-infinite potential energy could have had no beginning and will have no end, (...)
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  33. H. D. Oakeley (1931). The Status of the Past. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 32:227 - 250.
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  34. Ian B. Phillips (2009). Robin le Poidevin the Images of Time: An Essay on Temporal Representation. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 60 (2):439-446.
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  35. Gilbert Plumer (1985). The Myth of the Specious Present. Mind 94 (373):19-35.
    The doctrine of the specious present holds that sensation at an instant encompasses objects as they are over an interval. Now there actually is intersubjective agreement with respect to past, present, and future determinations, and it is a necessary condition for legitimately postulating them as objective. I argue that the specious present doctrine would make this actuality an impossibility, and that the data on which the doctrine is based do not in fact support it.
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  36. Israel Rosenfield (2000). Consciousness and Subjectivity: Memory, Language and the "Body Image". Intellectica 31:111-123.
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  37. Charles Scott (1999). Memory of Time in the Light of Flesh. Continental Philosophy Review 32 (4):421-432.
    I wish to show that living is composed of events that are defined by memories, that memories are inclusive of what we might call animality, that memories are definitive of the occurrence of time, and that experiences of light and of animality are inseparably associated. Our ability to communicate With animals, our projections onto them, and our own experiences of animality show memories of something that is intrinsic to our lives and to events of appearance as well as something that (...)
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  38. Stephen Tyman (1983). The Phenomenology of Forgetting. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 44 (September):45-60.
  39. Roger Wasserman (2008). On a Common and Unmooted (Neo-)Platonic Source for the Husserlian and Augustinian Conceptions of Memory: A Response to Michael R. Kelly. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 82 (2):293-315.
    Although Michael Kelly, in his article, “On the Mind’s Pronouncement of Time” (Proceedings of the ACPA 78 [2005]: 247–62), is correct to maintain that Augustine and Husserl share a common conception of time-consciousness, I argue that the similarity does not lie where he thinks nor is it restricted to Husserl’s early period. Instead I locate the source of this commonality in a shared response to a particular Platonic problematic, which I find expressed at Parmenides 151e–152e. This essay shows how the (...)
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