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  1. Darwinism as a Scientific Theory: Professor Agassiz on the Origin of Species.Louis Agassiz - 1967 - In Raymond Jackson Wilson (ed.), Darwinism and the American Intellectual. Homewood, Ill., Dorsey Press.
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  2. A Darwinian Left.Peter Amato - 2003 - Social Theory and Practice 29 (3):515-522.
    Singer argues that thinking on the Left insufficiently appropriates the broader insights about life and human nature made possible by Darwin. I think Singer has it backwards: the problem is not that Darwin has insufficiently been allowed to influence thinking on the Left, but, rather, that the meaning of “Darwinism” has been distorted by the wider scientific and intellectual communities broadly as a support for Right-wing views including patriarchy and racism since its early days. That Darwin’s theories have so often (...)
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  3. Review. Darwinism's Struggle for Survival: Heredity and the Hypothesis of Natural Selection. J Gayon.R. Amundsom - 1999 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 50 (4):761-767.
  4. Following Form and Function: A Philosophical Archaeology of Life Science.Stephen Asma - 1996 - Northwestern University Press.
    The concepts of form and function have traditionally been defined in terms of biology and then extended to other disciplines. Stephen T. Asma examines the various interpretations of form and function in science and philosophy, reflecting on the philosophical presuppositions underlying the work of Geoffroy, Cuvier, Darwin, and others. -/- In the continental tradition of Canguilhem and Foucault, Asma's treatment of the historical form/function dispute analyzes the complex interactions among ideologies, metaphysical commitments, and research programs. Following Form and Function is (...)
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  5. Following Form and Function: A Philosophical Archeology of Life Science.Stephen Asma - 1996 - Northwestern University Press.
    The concepts of form and function have traditionally been defined in terms of biology and then extended to other disciplines. Stephen T. Asma examines the various interpretations of form and function in science and philosophy, reflecting on the philosophical presuppositions underlying the work of Geoffroy, Cuvier, Darwin, and others. -/- In the continental tradition of Canguilhem and Foucault, Asma's treatment of the historical form/function dispute analyzes the complex interactions among ideologies, metaphysical commitments, and research programs. Following Form and Function is (...)
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  6. Creation and Evolution.Robin Attfield - 2008 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 45:41-47.
    It is not inconsistent to believe in both creation and in Darwinian evolution at the same time as rejecting creationism, and endorsing a realist stance about religious and scientific language. Belief in creation is argued to be every bit as defensible as Darwinism, and reconcilable with phenomena such as predation. If (as Richard Dawkins holds) evolution is the only possible pathway to life as we know it, then a life-loving creator would select this pathway. If it is not the only (...)
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  7. Neo‐Darwinism: An Uneven Assessment. Evolutionary Theory: Paths Into the Future. Edited by J. W. POLLARD. John Wiley and Sons, 1984, Pp. 271. £21.50. [REVIEW]Francisco J. Ayala - 1985 - Bioessays 3 (1):44-45.
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  8. Book Review Of: Darwinism Defended: A Dude to the Evolution Controversies (Written by Michael Ruse, 1982). [REVIEW]L. Azar - 1986 - New Scholasticism 60 (2).
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  9. Marx and Darwin.T. Ball - 1979 - Political Theory 7 (4):469-483.
  10. On Warren's Response to "Marx and Darwin: A Reconsideration".Terence Ball & Terrell Carver - 1982 - Political Theory 10 (2):307-314.
  11. Mind & Cosmos: Why the Materialist Neo-Darwinian Conception of Nature is Almost Certainly False by Thomas Nagel. [REVIEW]Pierfrancesco Basile - 2014 - Process Studies 43 (1):111-114.
  12. Hamilton's Two Conceptions of Social Fitness.Jonathan Birch - 2016 - Philosophy of Science 83 (5):848-860.
    Hamilton introduced two conceptions of social fitness, which he called neighbour-modulated fitness and inclusive fitness. Although he regarded them as formally equivalent, a re-analysis of his own argument for their equivalence brings out two important assumptions on which it rests: weak additivity and actor's control. When weak additivity breaks down, neither fitness concept is appropriate in its original form. When actor's control breaks down, neighbour-modulated fitness may be appropriate, but inclusive fitness is not. Yet I argue that, despite its more (...)
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  13. Natural Selection and the Maximization of Fitness.Jonathan Birch - 2016 - Biological Reviews 91 (3):712-727.
    The notion that natural selection is a process of fitness maximization gets a bad press in population genetics, yet in other areas of biology the view that organisms behave as if attempting to maximize their fitness remains widespread. Here I critically appraise the prospects for reconciliation. I first distinguish four varieties of fitness maximization. I then examine two recent developments that may appear to vindicate at least one of these varieties. The first is the ‘new’ interpretation of Fisher's fundamental theorem (...)
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  14. Has Grafen Formalized Darwin?Jonathan Birch - 2014 - Biology and Philosophy 29 (2):175-180.
    One key aim of Grafen’s Formal Darwinism project is to formalize ‘modern biology’s understanding and updating of Darwin’s central argument’. In this commentary, I consider whether Grafen has succeeded in this aim.
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  15. Darwinism Without Populations: A More Inclusive Understanding of the “Survival of the Fittest”.Bouchard Frédéric - 2011 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 42 (1):106-114.
    Following Wallace’s suggestion, Darwin framed his theory using Spencer’s expression “survival of the fittest”. Since then, fitness occupies a significant place in the conventional understanding of Darwinism, even though the explicit meaning of the term ‘fitness’ is rarely stated. In this paper I examine some of the different roles that fitness has played in the development of the theory. Whereas the meaning of fitness was originally understood in ecological terms, it took a statistical turn in terms of reproductive success throughout (...)
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  16. The Gene’s-Eye View, Major Transitions and the Formal Darwinism Project.Andrew F. G. Bourke - 2014 - Biology and Philosophy 29 (2):241-248.
    I argue that Grafen’s formal darwinism project could profitably incorporate a gene’s-eye view, as informed by the major transitions framework. In this, instead of the individual being assumed to maximise its inclusive fitness, genes are assumed to maximise their inclusive fitness. Maximisation of fitness at the individual level is not a straightforward concept because the major transitions framework shows that there are several kinds of biological individual. In addition, individuals have a definable fitness, exhibit individual-level adaptations and arise in a (...)
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  17. The Eclipse of Pseudo-Darwinism? Reflections on Some Recent Developments in Darwin Studies.Peter J. Bowler - 2009 - History of Science 47 (158):431-443.
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  18. Revisiting the Eclipse of Darwinism.Peter J. Bowler - 2005 - Journal of the History of Biology 38 (1):19-32.
    The article sums up a number of points made by the author concerning the response to Darwinism in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, and repeats the claim that a proper understanding of the theory's impact must take account of the extent to which what are now regarded as the key aspects of Darwin's thinking were evaded by his immediate followers. Potential challenges to this position are described and responded to.
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  19. Darwin and Darwinism.Borden P. Bowne - 1909 - Hibbert Journal 8:122.
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  20. The Mastodon in the Room: How Darwinian is Neo-Darwinism?Daniel R. Brooks - 2011 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 42 (1):82-88.
    Failing to acknowledge substantial differences between Darwinism and neo-Darwinism impedes evolutionary biology. Darwin described evolution as the outcome of interactions between the nature of the organism and the nature of the conditions, each relatively autonomous but both historically and spatially intertwined. Furthermore, he postulated that the nature of the organism was more important than the nature of the conditions, leading to natural selection as an inevitable emergent product of biological systems. The neo-Darwinian tradition assumed a creative rather than selective view (...)
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  21. A Centennial Retrospective of John Dewey's "The Influence of Darwinism on Philosophy".Matthew J. Brown - manuscript
    n 1909, the 50th anniversary of both the publication of Origin of the Species and his own birth, John Dewey published "The Influence of Darwin on Philosophy." This optimistic essay saw Darwin's advance not only as one of empirical or theoretical biology, but a logical and conceptual revolution that would shake every corner of philosophy. Dewey tells us less about the influence that Darwin exerted over philosophy over the past 50 years and instead prophesied the influence it would take in (...)
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  22. Darwin, Naturalist: The Case of Fertilization of Orchids.Magi Cadevall - 2009 - Teorema: International Journal of Philosophy 28 (2):95-105.
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  23. Anti-Darwin, Anti-Spencer: Friedrich Nietzsche's Critique Of Darwin And "Darwinism".Lewis Call - 1998 - History of Science 36 (1):1-22.
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  24. Beyond Generalized Darwinism. II. More Things in Heaven and Earth.Werner Callebaut - 2011 - Biological Theory 6 (4):351-365.
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  25. Beyond Generalized Darwinism. I. Evolutionary Economics From the Perspective of Naturalistic Philosophy of Biology.Werner Callebaut - 2011 - Biological Theory 6 (4):338-350.
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  26. Science and Religion: 5 Questions.Gregg Caruso - 2014 - Automatic Press/VIP.
    Are science and religion compatible when it comes to understanding cosmology (the origin of the universe), biology (the origin of life and of the human species), ethics, and the human mind (minds, brains, souls, and free will)? Do science and religion occupy non-overlapping magisteria? Is Intelligent Design a scientific theory? How do the various faith traditions view the relationship between science and religion? What, if any, are the limits of scientific explanation? What are the most important open questions, problems, or (...)
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  27. John Durant, Ed.: "Darwinism and Divinity". [REVIEW]F. F. Centore - 1988 - The Thomist 52 (2):357.
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  28. Judaism, Darwinism, and the Typology of Suffering.Shai Cherry - 2011 - Zygon 46 (2):317-329.
    Abstract. Darwinism has attracted proportionately less attention from Jewish thinkers than from Christian thinkers. One significant reason for the disparity is that the theodicies created by Jews to contend with the catastrophes which punctuated Jewish history are equally suited to address the massive extinctions which characterize natural history. Theologies of divine hiddenness, restraint, and radical immanence, coming together in the sixteenth-century mystical cosmogony of Isaac Luria, have been rehabilitated and reworked by modern Jewish thinkers in the post-Darwin era.
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  29. La llama áurea de Darwin: Respuestas de la Bioquímica al diseño inteligente.V. Claramonte - 2009 - Teorema: International Journal of Philosophy 28 (2).
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  30. Conference on Evolution and the Human Sciences.Leda Cosmides, Martin Daly, Richard Dawkins, Daniel Dennett, W. D. Hamilton, Philip Kitcher, John Maynard Smith, Steven Pinker, Elliott Sober & Dan Sperber - 1993 - Biology and Philosophy 8 (131):699-700.
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  31. Uenther's Darwinism and the Problems of Life. [REVIEW]Henry Edward Crampton - 1907 - Journal of Philosophy 4 (11):297.
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  32. The Ant and the Peacock: Altruism and Sexual Selection From Darwin to Today.Helen Cronin - 1995 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 46 (1):122-138.
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  33. Exploring Mouse Trap History.Joachim L. Dagg - 2011 - Evolution Education and Outreach 4 (3):397-414.
    Since intelligent design (ID) advocates claimed the ubiquitous mouse trap as an example of systems that cannot have evolved, mouse trap history is doubly relevant to studying material culture. On the one hand, debunking ID claims about mouse traps and, by implication, also about other irreducibly complex systems has a high educational value. On the other hand, a case study of mouse trap history may contribute insights to the academic discussion about material culture evolution. Michael Behe argued that mouse traps (...)
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  34. L'origine delle specie.Charles Darwin - 1967 - Boringhieri.
  35. Darwin and Darwinism.Richard Dawkins - unknown
    To most people through history it has always seemed obvious that the teeming diversity of life, the uncanny perfection with which living organisms are equipped to survive and multiply, and the bewildering complexity of living machinery, can only have come about through divine creation. Yet repeatedly it has occurred to isolated thinkers that there might be an alternative to supernatural creation.
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  36. Towards a Darwinian Approach to Mathematics.Helen De Cruz - 2006 - Foundations of Science 11 (1-2):157-196.
    In the past decades, recent paradigm shifts in ethology, psychology, and the social sciences have given rise to various new disciplines like cognitive ethology and evolutionary psychology. These disciplines use concepts and theories of evolutionary biology to understand and explain the design, function and origin of the brain. I shall argue that there are several good reasons why this approach could also apply to human mathematical abilities. I will review evidence from various disciplines (cognitive ethology, cognitive psychology, cognitive archaeology and (...)
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  37. Why Peirce Matters : The Symbol in Deacon’s Symbolic Species.Tanya De Villiers - 2007 - Language Sciences 29 (1):88-101.
    In ‘‘Why brains matter: an integrational perspective on The Symbolic Species’’ Cowley (2002) [Language Sciences 24, 73–95] suggests that Deacon pictures brains as being able to process words qua tokens, which he identifies as the theory’s Achilles’ heel. He goes on to argue that Deacon’s thesis on the co-evolution of language and mind would benefit from an integrational approach. This paper argues that Cowley’s criticism relies on an invalid understanding of Deacon’s use the concept of ‘‘symbolic reference’’, which he appropriates (...)
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  38. Darwin's Predictable Defenders: A Response to Massimo Pigliucci by William A. Dembski.William Dembski - manuscript
    Some Darwinists keep their Darwinism close to the vest. Others wear it on their sleeves. Massimo Pigliucci has it tattooed on his forehead. Indeed, his "Darwin Day" celebrations at the University of Tennessee have become an annual orgy of self-congratulation before Darwin's idol.
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  39. Darwinism Evolving. System Dynamics and the Genealogy of Natural Selection.David J. Depew, Bruce H. Weber & Ernst Mayr - 1996 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 18 (1):135.
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  40. The Progress of Society: An Inquiry Into an 'Old-Fashioned' Thesis of Walter Bagehot.Ignaas Devisch - 2011 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 19 (3):519 - 541.
    The nineteenth century saw the rise of Darwinism as a new paradigm for the study of nature and man mans an integral part thereof. Many scholars were intent on removing the abstract principles and universal truths of early modern philosophy in favour of understanding man's nature through more scientifically-based methods. Walter Bagehot (1826?1877) was one of the leading exponents of this view. Our focus is on one of Bagehot's famous books, Physics and Politics, or thoughts on the application of the (...)
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  41. The Influence of Darwinism on Philosophy.John Dewey - 2009 - In Michael Ruse (ed.), Philosophy After Darwin: Classic and Contemporary Readings. Princeton University Press. pp. 55.
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  42. The Darwinization of the World.Antonio Dieguez - 2009 - Teorema: International Journal of Philosophy 28 (2):215-221.
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  43. Nihilismo darwinista.Antonio Diéguez - 2009 - Teorema: International Journal of Philosophy 28 (2):215-221.
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  44. Darwinian Evolution Across the Disciplines.Michael R. Dietrich, C. Robertson McClung & Mark A. McPeek - 2001 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 23 (3/4):339 - 340.
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  45. Darwinism and Human Dignity.Ben Dixon - 2007 - Environmental Values 16 (1):23 - 42.
    James Rachels argued against the possibility of finding some moral capacity in humans that confers upon them a unique dignity. His argument contends that Darwinism challenges such attempts, because Darwinism predicts that any morally valuable capacity able to bestow a unique dignity is likely present to a degree within both humans and non-human animals alike. I make the case, however, that some of Darwin's own thoughts regarding the nature of conscience provide a springboard for criticising Rachels's claim here. Using Darwin's (...)
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  46. Darwinism, Genre Theory, and City Laments.F. Dobbs-Allsopp - 2000 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 120 (4):625-630.
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  47. Concerning Darwinism.Jasper Doomen - 2012 - Journal of Human Values 18 (2):173-185.
    Darwinism has become an encompassing theory, leaving the confines of science and accounting for all aspects of life. Such an outlook entails important consequences for the evaluation of life. In particular, organisms are considered mere means for species’ preservation and development, while reason is no special faculty, but rather an outgrowth of functions that are rudimentarily present in animals. Darwinism cannot, for that reason, be said to be ‘true’, but if Darwinism is the correct view, the implications for man are (...)
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  48. The Irish Response to Darwinism.Thomas Duddy - 2004
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  49. Introducing Darwin to the Uninitiated. [REVIEW]Sean Dyde & Charles Wolfe - 2009 - Metascience 18 (2):325-329.
  50. Evolutionary Theory in the Social Philosophy of Charlotte Perkins Gilman.Maureen L. Egan - 1989 - Hypatia 4 (1):102 - 119.
    This paper examines Charlotte Perkins Gilman's connection with the evolutionist ideas of late nineteenth century Reform Darwinism. It focuses on the assumptions that her language and use of metaphor reveal, and upon her vision of human social evolution as a melioristic process through which the equality of the sexes must finally emerge.
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