Results for 'Phillip Lord'

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  1.  14
    The rich club of the brain in bipolar disorder.Lord Anton, Roberts Gloria, Breakspear Michael & Mitchell Phillip - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  2. The Ontology for Biomedical Investigations.Anita Bandrowski, Ryan Brinkman, Mathias Brochhausen, Matthew H. Brush, Bill Bug, Marcus C. Chibucos, Kevin Clancy, Mélanie Courtot, Dirk Derom, Michel Dumontier, Liju Fan, Jennifer Fostel, Gilberto Fragoso, Frank Gibson, Alejandra Gonzalez-Beltran, Melissa A. Haendel, Yongqun He, Mervi Heiskanen, Tina Hernandez-Boussard, Mark Jensen, Yu Lin, Allyson L. Lister, Phillip Lord, James Malone, Elisabetta Manduchi, Monnie McGee, Norman Morrison, James A. Overton, Helen Parkinson, Bjoern Peters, Philippe Rocca-Serra, Alan Ruttenberg, Susanna-Assunta Sansone, Richard H. Scheuermann, Daniel Schober, Barry Smith, Larisa N. Soldatova, Christian J. Stoeckert, Chris F. Taylor, Carlo Torniai, Jessica A. Turner, Randi Vita, Patricia L. Whetzel & Jie Zheng - 2016 - PLoS ONE 11 (4):e0154556.
    The Ontology for Biomedical Investigations (OBI) is an ontology that provides terms with precisely defined meanings to describe all aspects of how investigations in the biological and medical domains are conducted. OBI re-uses ontologies that provide a representation of biomedical knowledge from the Open Biological and Biomedical Ontologies (OBO) project and adds the ability to describe how this knowledge was derived. We here describe the state of OBI and several applications that are using it, such as adding semantic expressivity to (...)
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  3. Promoting coherent minimum reporting guidelines for biological and biomedical investigations: the MIBBI project.Chris F. Taylor, Dawn Field, Susanna-Assunta Sansone, Jan Aerts, Rolf Apweiler, Michael Ashburner, Catherine A. Ball, Pierre-Alain Binz, Molly Bogue, Tim Booth, Alvis Brazma, Ryan R. Brinkman, Adam Michael Clark, Eric W. Deutsch, Oliver Fiehn, Jennifer Fostel, Peter Ghazal, Frank Gibson, Tanya Gray, Graeme Grimes, John M. Hancock, Nigel W. Hardy, Henning Hermjakob, Randall K. Julian, Matthew Kane, Carsten Kettner, Christopher Kinsinger, Eugene Kolker, Martin Kuiper, Nicolas Le Novere, Jim Leebens-Mack, Suzanna E. Lewis, Phillip Lord, Ann-Marie Mallon, Nishanth Marthandan, Hiroshi Masuya, Ruth McNally, Alexander Mehrle, Norman Morrison, Sandra Orchard, John Quackenbush, James M. Reecy, Donald G. Robertson, Philippe Rocca-Serra, Henry Rodriguez, Heiko Rosenfelder, Javier Santoyo-Lopez, Richard H. Scheuermann, Daniel Schober, Barry Smith & Jason Snape - 2008 - Nature Biotechnology 26 (8):889-896.
    Throughout the biological and biomedical sciences there is a growing need for, prescriptive ‘minimum information’ (MI) checklists specifying the key information to include when reporting experimental results are beginning to find favor with experimentalists, analysts, publishers and funders alike. Such checklists aim to ensure that methods, data, analyses and results are described to a level sufficient to support the unambiguous interpretation, sophisticated search, reanalysis and experimental corroboration and reuse of data sets, facilitating the extraction of maximum value from data sets (...)
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  4. Chase, A. H., and H. Phillips, Jr., A New Greek Reader.E. W. Lord - 1954 - Classical Weekly 48:163.
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  5.  12
    John W. Baldwin, Knights, Lords, and Ladies: In Search of Aristocrats in the Paris Region, 1180–1220, with a foreword by William Chester Jordan. (Middle Ages.) Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2019. Pp. 432; color and black-and-white figures. $59.95. ISBN: 978-0-8122-5128-9. [REVIEW]Jenna Phillips - 2022 - Speculum 97 (2):475-476.
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  6.  13
    Reply to Vaidya, Guhe, and Williams on the Bloomsbury Translation of the Tattva-cintā-maṇi of Gaṅgeśa.Stephen Phillips - 2023 - Philosophy East and West 73 (2):519-529.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Reply to Vaidya, Guhe, and Williams on the Bloomsbury Translation of the Tattva-cintā-maṇi of GaṅgeśaStephen Phillips (bio)More or less happy with the reviews, I would like mainly, in response, to identify advances made in the study of Gaṅgeśa. Anand Vaidya articulates a clearer overview of Gaṅgeśa's theory of knowledge; Eberhard Guhe shows a better way to render the notion of vyāpti, "pervasion," which is central in the theory of (...)
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  7.  32
    The Logics of Counterinference and the “Additional Condition” (upādhi) in Gaṅgeśa’s Defense of the Nyāya Theistic Inference from Effects.Stephen Phillips - 2022 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 50 (5):821-833.
    This paper is taken from a long section of the _Tattva-cintā-maṇi_ by Gaṅgeśa that is devoted to proving the existence of—to use an inadequate word—“God” in a somewhat minimalist sense. The _īśvara_, the “Lord,” is for Gaṅgeśa, following Nyāya predecessors, a divine agent, a self, responsible for much, not all, of the order in the world. Unseen Force, _adṛṣṭa_, which is in effect _karman_ made by human action, is also a powerful agent as well as things’ intrinsic natures. Moreover, (...)
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  8. A Treatise of the Laws of Nature. By the Right Reverend... Richard Cumberland, Lord Bishop of Peterborough. Made English From the Latin by John Maxwell,... To Which is Prefix'd, an Introduction.Richard Cumberland, R. Phillips, John Knapton, Senex & Francis Fayram - 1727 - Printed by R. Phillips; and Sold by J. Knapton, ... J. Senex, ... F. Fayram, ... J. Osborne, and T. Longman, ... And T. Osborne,..
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  9. The Fabric of Space: Intrinsic vs. Extrinsic Distance Relations.Phillip Bricker - 1993 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 18 (1):271-294.
    In this chapter, I evaluate various conceptions of distance. Of the two most prominent, one takes distance relations to be intrinsic, the other extrinsic. I recommend pluralism: different conceptions can peacefully coexist as long as each holds sway over a distinct region of logical space. But when one asks which conception holds sway at the actual world, one conception stands out. It is the conception of distance embodied in differential geometry, what I call the Gaussian conception. On this conception, all (...)
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  10.  5
    Conventional revolution: the ethical implications of the natural progress of neonatal intensive care to artificial wombs.Phillip Stefan Wozniak & Ashley Keith Fernandes - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics Recent Issues 47 (12):e54-e54.
    Research teams have used extra-uterine systems to support premature fetal lambs and to bring them to maturation in a way not previously possible. The researchers have called attention to possible implications of these systems for sustaining premature human fetuses in a similar way. Some commentators have pointed out that perfecting these systems for human fetuses might alter a standard expectation in abortion practices: that the termination of a pregnancy also entails the death of the fetus. With Biobags, it might be (...)
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  11.  29
    Virtue Ethics: A Qualified Success Story.Phillip Montague - 1992 - American Philosophical Quarterly 29 (1):53 - 61.
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  12.  96
    Self-defense, culpability, and distributive justice.Phillip Montague - 2010 - Law and Philosophy 29 (1):75-91.
    This paper has a threefold purpose: to question the adequacy of two familiar proposals for explaining the permissibility of harming others in self-defense, to suggest an alternative explanation, and to answer some objections to this latter explanation. By and large, discussions of the proposals whose adequacy I will question focus on what they imply about the permissibility of self-defense in controversial cases. I will argue here that the proposals themselves contain large and significant theoretical gaps. Accordingly, examining their implications for (...)
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  13.  31
    The Darwinian Revolution: Science Red in Tooth and Claw. Michael Ruse.Phillip R. Sloan - 1981 - Philosophy of Science 48 (4):623-627.
  14. Hope and its Place in Mind.Phillip Pettit - 2004 - Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science (1):152--165.
    People may have open minds on whether a life-extending drug or technology is going to be developed before their sixties and may strongly desire that development. Do they therefore hope that it occurs? Do they hope for it in the substantive sense of “pinning their hopes” on the development? No, they do not. Hoping for a prospect in that sense certainly presupposes having an open mind on whether it will occur and having a desire for its occurrence. But, more crucially, (...)
     
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  15. Composition as a Kind of Identity.Phillip Bricker - 2016 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 59 (3):264-294.
    Composition as identity, as I understand it, is a theory of the composite structure of reality. The theory’s underlying logic is irreducibly plural; its fundamental primitive is a generalized identity relation that takes either plural or singular arguments. Strong versions of the theory that incorporate a generalized version of the indiscernibility of identicals are incompatible with the framework of plural logic, and should be rejected. Weak versions of the theory that are based on the idea that composition is merely analogous (...)
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  16.  11
    Polarity and Analogy.Phillip De Lacy & G. E. R. Lloyd - 1967 - American Journal of Philology 88 (4):485.
  17.  31
    Absolute and Personal Idealism.Phillip Ferreira - 2008 - The Pluralist 3 (2):27 - 46.
  18. Philosophies of Exclusion: Liberal Political Theory and Immigration.Phillip Cole - 2000 - Edinburgh University Press.
    The mass movement of people across the globe constitutes a major feature of world politics today. -/- Whatever the cause of the movement - often war, famine, economic hardship, political repression or climate change - the governments of western capitalist states see this 'torrent of people in flight' as a serious threat to their stability and the scale of this migration indicates a need for a radical re-thinking of both political theory and practice, for the sake of political, social and (...)
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  19.  89
    Migration and the Human Right to Health.Phillip Cole - 2009 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 18 (1):70.
    In December 2007 it was revealed that the British government is considering the exclusion of certain groups of migrants—those considered to be present “illegally”—from primary health care provided by the National Health Service. At present, practitioners have discretion to accept any individual for NHS treatment regardless of their status. A joint Home Office and Department of Health review is examining this access for foreign nationals, and the likely outcome is the restriction of access to irregular migrants, which would, according to (...)
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  20.  92
    Shame, Publicity, and Self‐Esteem.Phillip Galligan - 2014 - Ratio 29 (1):57-72.
    Shame is a puzzling emotion. On the one hand, to feel ashamed is to feel badly about oneself; but on the other hand, it also seems to be a response to the way the subject is perceived by other people. So whose standards is the subject worried about falling short of, his own or those of an audience? I begin by arguing that it is the audience's standards that matter, and then present a theory of shame according to which shame (...)
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  21.  78
    Kant on the history of nature: The ambiguous heritage of the critical philosophy for natural history.Phillip R. Sloan - 2006 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 37 (4):627-648.
    This paper seeks to show Kant’s importance for the formal distinction between descriptive natural history and a developmental history of nature that entered natural history discussions in the late eighteenth century. It is argued that he developed this distinction initially upon Buffon’s distinctions of ‘abstract’ and ‘physical’ truths, and applied these initially in his distinction of ‘varieties’ from ‘races’ in anthropology. In the 1770s, Kant appears to have given theoretical preference to the ‘history’ of nature [Naturgeschichte] over ‘description’ of nature (...)
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  22. Defining ‘business ethics’: Like nailing jello to a wall.Phillip V. Lewis - 1985 - Journal of Business Ethics 4 (5):377-383.
    Business ethics is a topic receiving much attention in the literature. However, the term 'business ethics' is not adequately defined. Typical definitions refer to the rightness or wrongness of behavior, but not everyone agrees on what is morally right or wrong, good or bad, ethical or unethical. To complicate the problem, nearly all available definitions exist at highly abstract levels. This article focuses on contemporary definitions of business ethics by business writers and professionals and on possible areas of agreement among (...)
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  23.  34
    John Locke, John Ray, and the problem of the natural system.Phillip R. Sloan - 1972 - Journal of the History of Biology 5 (1):1-53.
  24. Two concepts of rights.Phillip Montague - 1980 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 9 (4):372-384.
  25. What You’re Rationally Required to Do and What You Ought to Do.Errol Lord - 2017 - Mind 126 (504):1109-1154.
    It is a truism that we ought to be rational. Despite this, it has become popular to think that it is not the case that we ought to be rational. In this paper I argue for a view about rationality—the view that what one is rationally required to do is determined by the normative reasons one possesses—by showing that it can vindicate that one ought to be rational. I do this by showing that it is independently very plausible that what (...)
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  26.  33
    Measuring quality of life.Phillip Woodrow - 2001 - Journal of Medical Ethics 27 (3):205-a-205.
    sirRavenscroft and Bell's study of end-of-life decision making in intensive care1 provides valuable evidence ….
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  27. Quantified Modal Logic and the Plural De Re.Phillip Bricker - 1989 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 14 (1):372-394.
    Modal sentences of the form "every F might be G" and "some F must be G" have a threefold ambiguity. in addition to the familiar readings "de dicto" and "de re", there is a third reading on which they are examples of the "plural de re": they attribute a modal property to the F's plurally in a way that cannot in general be reduced to an attribution of modal properties to the individual F's. The plural "de re" readings of modal (...)
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  28. Island Universes and the Analysis of Modality.Phillip Bricker - 2001 - In Gerhard Preyer & Frank Siebelt (eds.), Reality and Humean Supervenience: Essays on the Philosophy of David Lewis. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    It follows from Humean principles of plenitude, I argue, that island universes are possible: physical reality might have 'absolutely isolated' parts. This makes trouble for Lewis's modal realism; but the realist has a way out. First, accept absolute actuality, which is defensible, I argue, on independent grounds. Second, revise the standard analysis of modality: modal operators are 'plural', not 'individual', quantifiers over possible worlds. This solves the problem of island universes and confers three additional benefits: an 'unqualified' principle of compossibility (...)
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  29.  62
    Punishment and societal defense.Phillip Montague - 1983 - Criminal Justice Ethics 2 (1):30-36.
  30. The Bounds of Possibility: Puzzles of Modal Variation. Cian Dorr and John Hawthorne, with Juhani Yli-Vakkuri.Phillip Bricker - 2023 - Journal of Philosophy 120 (9):511-520.
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  31. Hylas' Parity Argument.Phillip Cummins - 1982 - In Colin Murray Turbayne (ed.), Berkeley: Critical and Interpretive Essays. Univ of Minnesota Press.
  32.  36
    The promise of pick-the-winners contests for producing crowd probability forecasts.Phillip E. Pfeifer - 2016 - Theory and Decision 81 (2):255-278.
    This paper considers pick-the-winners contests as a simple method for harnessing the wisdom of crowds to produce probability forecasts. Pick-the-winners contests are those in which players pick the outcomes of selected future binary events with a prize going to the player with the most correct picks. In contrast to soliciting probability forecasts from experts, this paper shows that competition among players is to be encouraged because it improves the accuracy of the resulting crowd probability forecasts. This improvement comes because the (...)
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  33. Concrete possible worlds.Phillip Bricker - 2008 - In Theodore Sider, John Hawthorne & Dean W. Zimmerman (eds.), Contemporary debates in metaphysics. Malden, MA: Blackwell. pp. 111--134.
    In this chapter, I survey what I call Lewisian approaches to modality: approaches that analyze modality in terms of concrete possible worlds and their parts. I take the following four theses to be characteristic of Lewisian approaches to modality. (1) There is no primitive modality. (2) There exists a plurality of concrete possible worlds. (3) Actuality is an indexical concept. (4) Modality de re is to be analyzed in terms of counterparts, not transworld identity. After an introductory section in which (...)
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  34. The beatific vision of st. Thomas Aquinas.Phillip Blond - 2008 - In Adrian Pabst & Christoph Schneider (eds.), Encounter Between Eastern Orthodoxy and Radical Orthodoxy: Transfiguring the World Through the Word. Ashgate.
     
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  35.  6
    Demonic Deliberation as Rhetorical Revelation in Paradise Lost.Phillip J. Donnelly - 2022 - Principia: A Journal of Classical Education 1 (1):42-62.
    Classical education includes an apprenticeship in the art of rhetoric. It also gives a central place to the study of major works of literature, philosophy, and theology. There is often, however, an assumed disconnection between the art of rhetoric and the study of great texts. This disconnection undermines students’ ability to hear the voices of these texts as conversation partners in ongoing debates. This article illustrates how historically-based rhetorical-poetic reading enables us to hear the voices in a given text and (...)
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  36.  56
    A Minimalist Ethic of Duty.Phillip Goggans - 2000 - Journal of Philosophical Research 25:431-436.
    It is proposed that an act is morally wrong just in case it is a violation of a duty not to perform that particular act. This is equivalent to the claim that acts have their moral status essentially. This theory preserves some main deontological intuitions without making problematic claims about kinds of acts.
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  37.  9
    A Minimalist Ethic of Duty.Phillip Goggans - 2000 - Journal of Philosophical Research 25:431-436.
    It is proposed that an act is morally wrong just in case it is a violation of a duty not to perform that particular act. This is equivalent to the claim that acts have their moral status essentially. This theory preserves some main deontological intuitions without making problematic claims about kinds of acts.
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  38.  20
    C. A. Campbell's Effort of Will Argument: P. D. GOSSELIN.Phillip D. Gosselin - 1977 - Religious Studies 13 (4):429-438.
    C. A. Campbell has for many years defended vigorously, and often persuasively, the following libertarian claims: that the libertarian concept of freedom of choice is meaningful; that the libertarian variety of freedom of choice is necessary for moral responsibility; and that the libertarian variety of freedom of choice is a reality. This paper will be concerned with Campbell's effort of will argument for the last claim.
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  39.  34
    Patriotism and political obligation.Phillip Montague - 1994 - Journal of Social Philosophy 25 (2):44-56.
    Arguments aimed at undermining certain accounts of the grounds of political obligations—no matter how successful they may be—fall far short of demonstrating that there are no such obligations. Doubts about the efficacy of these arguments in this latter regard seem even more justified when it is recognized that parallel lines of reasoning can be developed in the area of filial obligations , which arguments provide rather less than conclusive reasons for denying that there are filial obligations .Furthermore, we have good (...)
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  40. Absolute Actuality and the Plurality of Worlds.Phillip Bricker - 2006 - Philosophical Perspectives 20 (1):41–76.
    According to David Lewis, a realist about possible worlds must hold that actuality is relative: the worlds are ontologically all on a par; the actual and the merely possible differ, not absolutely, but in how they relate to us. Call this 'Lewisian realism'. The alternative, 'Leibnizian realism', holds that actuality is an absolute property that marks a distinction in ontological status. Lewis presents two arguments against Leibnizian realism. First, he argues that the Leibnizian realist cannot account for the contingency of (...)
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  41. Senses of humor as political virtues.Phillip Deen - 2018 - In Michel Croce & Maria Silvia Vaccarezza (eds.), Connecting Virtues: Advances in Ethics, Epistemology, and Political Philosophy. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley-Blackwell.
     
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  42. Realism without parochialism.Phillip Bricker - 2020 - In Modal Matters: Essays in Metaphysics. Oxford, England: Oxford University Press. pp. 40-76.
    I am a realist of a metaphysical stripe. I believe in an immense realm of "modal" and "abstract" entities, of entities that are neither part of, nor stand in any causal relation to, the actual, concrete world. For starters: I believe in possible worlds and individuals; in propositions, properties, and relations (both abundantly and sparsely conceived); in mathematical objects and structures; and in sets (or classes) of whatever I believe in. Call these sorts of entity, and the reality they comprise, (...)
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  43.  53
    Recent approaches to justifying punishment.Phillip Montague - 2002 - Philosophia 29 (1-4):1-34.
  44.  12
    4. Bosanquet, Idealism, and the Justification of Induction.Phillip Ferreira - 2005 - In William Sweet (ed.), Bernard Bosanquet and the Legacy of British Idealism. University of Toronto Press. pp. 90-110.
  45.  16
    Contradiction, Contrariety and Inference.Phillip Ferreira - 1998 - Bradley Studies 4 (2):123-144.
    F.H. Bradley has been characterized by many commentators as something of a sceptic. And the reason why Bradley is often cast in this light is, I believe, largely a result of his theory of relations. As even the casual student is aware, the relational nature of all judgment leads, on Bradley’s analysis, to an infinite and, many have claimed, “vicious” regress. And when we add to this Bradley’s claim that all assertion is, at some level, “contradictory”, there seems to be (...)
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  46.  17
    Green’s Attack on Formal Logic.Phillip Ferreira - 2003 - Bradley Studies 9 (1):40-51.
    Despite renewed interest in T.H. Green’s social and political theory, little attention has as yet been given to his metaphysics and epistemology — even more neglected, though, are his views on logical matters. It is unclear why this is. I suspect that the obscurity of his discussion has much to do with it. Green routinely refers to writers in whom there is little interest today; and a good deal of effort is required to penetrate his technical vocabulary. Still, I believe (...)
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  47. Idealist Logic.Phillip Ferreira - 2014 - In W. J. Mander (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of British Philosophy in the Nineteenth Century. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.
    In this paper I provide an overview of the logical doctrine of three prominent idealists: T.H. Green, F.H. Bradley, and Bernard Bosanquet. I first identify the works in which this doctrine is developed; then I provide a general account of judgment, and inference. In my discussion of judgment I examine, the individual, hypothetical, and disjunctive forms as well as negation. In my examination of inference I compare the “nonlinear” and “linear” views. This comparison includes the idealist critique of syllogism, and (...)
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  48.  26
    Perceptual Ideality and the Ground of Inference.Phillip Ferreira - 1995 - Bradley Studies 1 (2):125-138.
    In this paper I would like to examine what I believe is an often misunderstood aspect of F.H. Bradley’s philosophy. Specifically, I want to consider Bradley’s views on the relation between perception and what he calls the “feeling base” of experience. Although Bradley’s doctrine of feeling is generally recognized as one of the most distinctive aspects of his thought, his theory of perception is, I believe, also unusual in that it views our perceptual experience as permeated by conceptual identities. As (...)
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  49.  96
    Modal Matters: Essays in Metaphysics.Phillip Bricker (ed.) - 2020 - Oxford, England: Oxford University Press.
    This volume contains eighteen papers, three with new postscripts, that were written over the past 35 years. Five of the papers have not been previously published. Together they provide a comprehensive account of modal reality—the realm of possible worlds—from a Humean perspective, with excursions into neighboring topics in metaphysics. Part 1 sketches an account of reality as a whole, both the mathematical and the modal, defending a form of plenitudinous realism: every consistent proposition is true of some portion of reality. (...)
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  50.  37
    A Modified Conception of Mechanisms.Phillip J. Torres - 2009 - Erkenntnis 71 (2):233-251.
    In this paper, I critique two conceptions of mechanisms, namely those put forth by Stuart Glennan (Erkenntnis 44:49–71, 1996; Philosophy of Science 69:S342–S353, 2002) and Machamer et al. (Philosophy of Science 67:1–25, 2000). Glennan’s conception, I argue, cannot account for mechanisms involving negative causation because of its interactionist posture. MDC’s view encounters the same problem due to its reificatory conception of activities—this conception, I argue, entails an onerous commitment to ontological dualism. In the place of Glennan and MDC, I propose (...)
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