About this topic
Related categories
Siblings:
164 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Sort by:
1 — 50 / 164
  1. Joseph Agassi (2005). Back to the Drawing Board. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 35 (4):509-518.
    Within ontology new theories are extremely rare. Hacking bravely claims to have one: "historical ontology" or "dynamic nominalism." Regrettably, he uses "nominalism" idiosyncratically, without explaining it or its qualifier. He does say what historical ontology is: it is "the presentation of the history of ontology in context." This idea is laudable, as it invites presenting idealism as once attractive but no longer so (due to changes in perception theory, for example). But this idea is a proposal, not a theory, muchless (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Joel Anderson (1996). The Personal Lives of Strong Evaluators: Identity, Pluralism, and Ontology in Charles Taylor's Value Theory. Constellations 3 (1):17-38.
  3. Sybol Anderson (2012). Heikki Ikäheimo and Arto Laitinen (Eds), Recognition and Social Ontology. [REVIEW] Critical Horizons 13 (1):134 - 137.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Sybol Anderson (2012). Heikki Ikäheimo and Arto Laitinen (Eds), Recognition and Social Ontology. Critical Horizons 13 (1):134 - 137.
    Heikki Ikäheimo and Arto Laitinen (eds), Recognition and Social Ontology Content Type Journal Article Category Book Review Pages 134-137 Authors Sybol Cook Anderson, St. Mary's College of Maryland, USA Journal Critical Horizons: A Journal of Philosophy & Social Theory Online ISSN 1568-5160 Print ISSN 1440-9917 Journal Volume Volume 13 Journal Issue Volume 13, Number 1 / 2012.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Sybol Cook Anderson (2012). Heikki Ikäheimo and Arto Laitinen (Eds), Recognition and Social Ontology (Leiden, EJ Brill, 2011), ISBN 978-90-04-20290-0 (Hbk), 398 Pp. US $182.00. [REVIEW] Critical Horizons 13 (1):134-137.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Nicholas Bardsley (2001). Collective Reasoning: A Critique of Martin Hollis's Position. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 4 (4):171-192.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Luca Barlassina & Fabio Del Prete, No Longer True.
    There are sentences that express the same temporally fully specified proposition at all contexts--call them 'context-insensitive, temporally specific sentences.' Sentence (1) 'Obama was born in 1961' is a case in point: at all contexts, it expresses the proposition ascribing to the year 1961 the property of being a time in which Obama was born. Suppose that someone uttered (1) in a context located on Christmas 2000 in our world. In this context, (1) is a true sentence about the past. Moreover, (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Hans Bernhard Schmid (2008). Plural Action. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 38 (1):25-54.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Roy Bhaskar (2007). 12 Theorising Ontology. In Clive Lawson, John Latsis & Nuno Martins (eds.), Contributions to Social Ontology. Routledge. 15--192.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Alban Bouvier (2004). Individual Beliefs and Collective Beliefs in Sciences and Philosophy: The Plural Subject and the Polyphonic Subject Accounts: Case Studies. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 34 (3):382-407.
    The issue of knowing what it means for a group to have collective beliefs is being discussed more and more in contemporary philosophy of the social sciences and philosophy of mind. Margaret Gilbert’s reconsideration of Durkheim’s viewpoint in the framework of the plural subject’s account is one of the most famous. This has implications in the history and the sociology of science—as well asin the history and sociology of philosophy—although Gilbert only outlined them in the former fields and said nothing (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Robert Greenleaf Brice (2008). A Reply to John Searle and Other Traditionalists. Multicultural Education 16 (2):37-40.
    One of the more recent pedagogical debates confronting university instructors is whether liberal education should be replaced with multiculturalism. John Searle has labeled these positions as “traditionalists” and “challengers,” respectively. While not finding “much that is objectionable in the [traditionalists’] assumptions,” Searle argues that the challengers’ assumptions are “weak” and “fallacious.” This negative outcome for the challengers however, is due in large part to Searle’s misrepresentation of their position. Searle presents a flawed, straw-man argument; he unfairly and inaccurately presents the (...)
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Krzysztof Brzechczyn (2009). Methodological Peculiarities of History in Light of Idealizational Theory of Science. Poznan Studies in the Philosophy of the Sciences and the Humanities 97 (1):137-157.
    The aim of the paper is an extension of the idealizational theory of science in order to explicate intuitions of historians and philosophers of history about unpredictability and contingency of history. The author identifies two types of essential structures: the first kind dominated by the main factor and the second kind which is dominated by a class of secondary factors. In an essential structure dominated by the main factor, the power of influence it exerts is greater than the sum of (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. F. Buekens & M. Boudry (2012). Psychoanalytic Facts as Unintended Institutional Facts. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 42 (2):239-269.
    We present an inference to the best explanation of the immense cultural success of Freudian psychoanalysis as a hermeneutic method. We argue that an account of psychoanalytic facts as products of unintended declarative speech acts explains this phenomenon. Our argument connects diverse, seemingly independent characteristics of psychoanalysis that have been independently confirmed, and applies key features of John Searle’s and Eerik Lagerspetz’s theory of institutional facts to the psychoanalytic edifice. We conclude with a brief defence of the institutional approach against (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Marc Champagne (2014). Book Review: Group Agency: The Possibility, Design, and Status of Corporate Agents. [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences 44 (2):252-258.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. A. Chatterjee (2013). Ontology, Epistemology, and Multimethod Research in Political Science. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 43 (1):73-99.
    Epistemologies and research methods are not free of metaphysics. This is to say that they are both, supported by (or presumed by), and support (or presume) fundamental ontologies. A discussion of the epistemological foundations of "multimethod" research in the social sciences—in as much as such research claims to unearth "causal" relations—therefore cannot avoid the ontological presuppositions or implications of such a discussion. But though there isn’t necessarily a perfect correspondence between ontology, epistemology, and methodology, they do constrain each other. As (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Hyundeuk Cheon (forthcoming). In What Sense Is Scientific Knowledge Collective Knowledge? Philosophy of the Social Sciences:0048393113486523.
    By taking the collective character of scientific research seriously, some philosophers have claimed that scientific knowledge is indeed collective knowledge. However, there is little clarity on what exactly is meant by collective knowledge. In this article, I argue that there are two notions of collective knowledge that have not been well distinguished: irreducibly collective knowledge (ICK) and jointly committed knowledge (JCK). The two notions provide different conditions under which it is justified to ascribe knowledge to a group. It is argued (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Alan D. Code (1991). Aristotle, Searle, and the Mind-Body Problem. In Ernest Lepore & Robert Van Gulick (eds.), John Searle and His Critics. Cambridge: Blackwell.
  18. Julian C. Cole (2012). An Abstract Status Function Account of Corporations. Philosophy of the Social Sciences (1):0048393112455106.
    In this article, I articulate and defend an account of corporations motivated by John Searle’s discussion of them in his Making the Social World. According to this account, corporations are abstract entities that are the products of status function Declarations. They are also connected with, though not reducible to, various people and certain of the power relations among them. Moreover, these connections are responsible for corporations having features that stereotypical abstract entities lack (e.g., the abilities to take actions and make (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Corbin Collins (1997). Searle on Consciousness and Dualism. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 5 (1):15-33.
    In this article, I examine and criticize John Searle's account of the relation between mind and body. Searle rejects dualism and argues that the traditional mind-body problem has a 'simple solution': mental phenomena are both caused by biological processes in the brain and are themselves features of the brain. More precisely, mental states and events are macro-properties of neurons in much the same way that solidity and liquidity are macro-properties of molecules. However, Searle also maintains that the mental is (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. J. Coulter (1982). Remarks on the Conceptualization of Social Structure. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 12 (1):33-46.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Elizabeth Cripps (2011). Collectivities Without Intention. Journal of Social Philosophy 42 (1):1-20.
  22. Dave Elder-Vass (2007). Re-Examining Bhaskar's Three Ontological Domains : The Lessons From Emergence. In Clive Lawson, John Latsis & Nuno Martins (eds.), Contributions to Social Ontology. Routledge. 15--160.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Ronald P. Endicott (1996). Searle, Syntax, and Observer-Relativity. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 26 (1):101-22.
    I critically examine some provocative arguments that John Searle presents in his book The Rediscovery of Mind to support the claim that the syntactic states of a classical computational system are "observer relative" or "mind dependent" or otherwise less than fully and objectively real. I begin by explaining how this claim differs from Searle's earlier and more well-known claim that the physical states of a machine, including the syntactic states, are insufficient to determine its semantics. In contrast, his more recent (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Ioannis D. Evrigenis (2008). Fear of Enemies and Collective Action. Cambridge University Press.
    This book explores the way in which the fear of enemies shapes political groups at their founding and helps to preserve them by consolidating them in times of crisis. It develops a theory of “negative association” that examines the dynamics captured by the maxim “The enemy of my enemy is my friend” and then traces its role in the history of political thought, demonstrating that the fear of external threats is an essential element of the formation and preservation of political (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Ángel Manuel Faerna (2011). Ontología social y derechos humanos en John R. Searle. Análisis Filosófico 31 (2):115-139.
    Este artículo se opone a la tesis recientemente sostenida por John Searle según la cual no existen los derechos humanos positivos. Argumentamos que la existencia de dichos derechos no es contradictoria, como pretende Searle, con las nociones de "derecho" y"derechos humanos" definidas en su ontología social. Por consiguiente, es posible aceptar la ontología social de Searle y afirmar al mismo tiempo que los derechos humanos positivos existen. En segundo lugar, ofrecemos razones para cuestionar la supuesta prioridad lógica de una ontología (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Evan Fales (1977). The Ontology of Social Roles. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 7 (2):139-161.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Guglielmo Feis & Umberto Sconfienza (2012). Challenging the Constitutive Rules Inviolability Dogma. Phenomenology and Mind 3:127-138.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. J. N. Findlay, J. E. McGechie, John R. Searle & Richard Taylor (1956). Report on Analysis 'Problem' No. 9. Analysis 16 (6):121 - 126.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. M. A. Finocchiaro (1981). Context in Reasoning: Reply to Marchi. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 11 (4):457-458.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Mattia Gallotti (2012). A Naturalistic Argument for the Irreducibility of Collective Intentionality. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 42 (1):3-30.
    According to many philosophers and scientists, human sociality is explained by our unique capacity to “share” attitudes with others. The conditions under which mental states are shared have been widely debated in the past two decades, focusing especially on the issue of their reducibility to individual intentionality and the place of collective intentions in the natural realm. It is not clear, however, to what extent these two issues are related and what methodologies of investigation are appropriate in each case. In (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Mattia Gallotti (2011). Why We Cooperate. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 27 (2):183-190.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Mattia Gallotti & John Michael (eds.) (forthcoming). Perspectives on Social Ontology and Social Cognition. Springer.
  33. Giovanni Gentile (1960). Genesis and Structure of Society. Urbana, University of Illinois Press.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Leon J. Goldstein (1974). Social Science, Ontology and Explanation: Some Further Reflections. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 4 (3):359-368.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Keith Graham (2002). Practical Reasoning in a Social World: How We Act Together. Cambridge University Press.
    In this book Keith Graham examines the philosophical assumptions behind the ideas of group membership and loyalty. Drawing out the significance of social context, he challenges individualist views by placing collectivities such as committees, classes or nations within the moral realm. He offers a new understanding of the multiplicity of sources which vie for the attention of human beings as they decide how to act, and challenges the conventional division between self-interest and altruism. He also offers a systematic account (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Ruth Groff (2012). Wholes, Parts, Form and Powers. Metascience 21 (2):399-402.
    Wholes, parts, form and powers Content Type Journal Article Category Book Review Pages 1-4 DOI 10.1007/s11016-011-9585-6 Authors Ruth Porter Groff, Department of Political Science, Saint Louis University, 3750 Lindell Blvd, St. Louis, MO 63108-3412, USA Journal Metascience Online ISSN 1467-9981 Print ISSN 0815-0796.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Ian Hacking (1997). Review Symposium on John R. Searle John R. Searle, The Construction of Social Reality. London: Allen Lane, 1995. Xviii+ 241 Pp.£ 20.00, ISBN 0-713-99112-7. [REVIEW] History of the Human Sciences 10 (4):83-92.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Joseph Heath (2006). The Benefits of Cooperation. Philosophy and Public Affairs 34 (4):313–351.
    There is an idea, extremely common among social contract theorists, that the primary function of social institutions is to secure some form of cooperative benefit. If individuals simply seek to satisfy their own preferences in a narrowly instrumental fashion, they will find themselves embroiled in collective action problems – interactions with an outcome that is worse for everyone involved than some other possible outcome. Thus they have reason to accept some form of constraint over their conduct, in order to achieve (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. M. Hedahl (2013). The Collective Fallacy The Possibility of Irreducibly Collective Action Without Corresponding Collective Moral Responsibility. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 43 (3):283-300.
    The common assumption is that if a group comprising moral agents can act intentionally, as a group, then the group itself can also be properly regarded as a moral agent with respect to that action. I argue, however, that this common assumption is the result of a problematic line of reasoning I refer to as “the collective fallacy.” Recognizing the collective fallacy as a fallacy allows us to see that if there are, in fact, irreducibly joint actors, then some of (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Peter Hedström & Petri Ylikoski (2010). Causal Mechanisms in the Social Sciences. Annual Review of Sociology 36:49–67.
    During the past decade, social mechanisms and mechanism-based ex- planations have received considerable attention in the social sciences as well as in the philosophy of science. This article critically reviews the most important philosophical and social science contributions to the mechanism approach. The first part discusses the idea of mechanism- based explanation from the point of view of philosophy of science and relates it to causation and to the covering-law account of explanation. The second part focuses on how the idea (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. David Henderson (2012). Norms. In Harold Kincaid (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Social Science. Oxford University Press.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. F. Hindriks (2013). Restructuring Searle's Making the Social World. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 43 (3):373-389.
    Institutions are normative social structures that are collectively accepted. In his book Making the Social World, John R. Searle maintains that these social structures are created and maintained by Status Function Declarations. The article’s author criticizes this claim and argues, first, that Searle overestimates the role that language plays in relation to institutions and, second, that Searle’s notion of a Status Function Declaration confuses more than it enlightens. The distinction is exposed between regulative and constitutive rules as being primarily a (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Frank Hindriks (2011). Making the Social World: The Structure of Human Civilization, John R. Searle, Oxford University Press, 2010, 224 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 27 (03):338-346.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Frank Hindriks, Sara Rachel Chant & Gerhard Preyer (2014). Beyond the Big Four and the Big Five. In Sara Rachel Chant, Frank Hindriks & Gerhard Preyer (eds.), From Individual to Collective Intentionality. 1-9.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Ted Honderich, Mind the Guff -- John Searle's Thinking On Consciousness and Free Will Examined.
    (I) John Searle's conception of consciousness in the 'Mind the Gap' issue of the Journal of Consciousness Studies remains short on content, no advance on either materialism or traditional dualism. Still, it is sufficiently contentful to be self-contradictory. And so his Biological Subjectivity on Two Levels, like materialism and dualism, needs replacing by a radically different conception of consciousness -- such as Consciousness as Existence. (II) From his idea that we can discover 'gaps', seeming absences of causal circumstances, in our (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. J. Hund (1994). Book Reviews : Margaret Gilbert, On Social Facts. London and New York: Routledge (Inter National Library of Philosophy), 1989. Pp. X, 521. $95.00. [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences 24 (2):225-234.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. John Hund (1998). Review Symposium on Searle : II. Searle's the Construction of Social Reality. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 28 (1):122-131.
    The Construction of Social Reality can be read at different levels, and this makes it hard to assess. At one level, it is a stunningly clear, comprehensive, and extremely simple introduction to the foundations of the social sciences. At another level, it is an idiosyncratic and interesting statement by a philoso pher of note who writes in a field with which he is barely acquainted. And at yet another level, it is a philosophical treatment of certain philosophical problems that Searle's (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Heikki Ikäheimo & Arto Laitinen (eds.) (2011). Recognition and Social Ontology. Brill.
    This unique collection examines the connections between two complementary approaches to philosophical social theory: Hegel-inspired theories of recognition (Anerkennung), and analytical social ontology.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. S. Jacobs (2006). Book Review: Conquest of Abundance: A Tale of Abstraction Versus the Richness of Being. [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences 36 (3):386-389.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. S. Jacobs (1989). Vindicating Universalism. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 19 (1):75-80.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 164