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Subcategories:History/traditions: Propositional Attitudes
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  1. Barbara Abbott (1995). Natural Language and Thought: Thinking in English. Behavior and Philosophy 23 (2):49-55.
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  2. Tuomo Aho (2003). Propositional Attitudes. Poznan Studies in the Philosophy of the Sciences and the Humanities 80 (1):201-221.
    Finland is internationally known as one of the leading centers of twentieth century analytic philosophy. This volume offers for the first time an overall survey of the Finnish analytic school. The rise of this trend is illustrated by original articles of Edward Westermarck, Eino Kaila, Georg Henrik von Wright, and Jaakko Hintikka. Contributions of Finnish philosophers are then systematically discussed in the fields of logic, philosophy of language, philosophy of science, history of philosophy, ethics and social philosophy. Metaphilosophical reflections on (...)
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  3. Kathleen Akins (ed.) (1996). Perception. Oxford University Press.
  4. Varol Akman, Notions and Oracles.
    On Crimmins and Perry’s account of propositional attitude ascription (1989), beliefs are concrete cognitive structures—particulars ("things in the head") that belong to an agent and that have a lifetime. They are related to the world and to other cognitive structures and abilities, allowing one to classify the latter by propositional content. Containing ideas and notions as constituents, beliefs are structured entities. The difference between notions and ideas is the difference between an agent’s ways of thinking about individuals vs. properties.
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  5. Joseph Almog (2005). Is a Unified Description of Language-and-Thought Possible? Journal of Philosophy 102 (10):493 - 531.
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  6. Wayne Alt (1980). There is No Paradox of Desire in Buddhism. Philosophy East and West 30 (4):521-528.
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  7. C. Anthony Anderson & Joseph Owens (eds.) (1990). Propositional Attitudes: The Role of Content in Language, Logic, and Mind. Csli.
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  8. James F. Anderson (1976). Language, Thought, and History. New Scholasticism 50 (3):323-332.
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  9. M. Astroh (1990). Logical Competence in the Context of Propositional Attitudes. Communication and Cognition 23 (1):3-44.
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  10. Jay David Atlas, Aboutness, Fiction, and Quantifying Into Intentional Contexts: A Linguistic Analysis of Prior, Quine, and Searle on Propositional Attitudes, Martinich on Fictional Reference, Taglicht on The..
    A Linguistic Analysis of Prior, Quine, and Searle on Propositional Attitudes, Martinich on Fictional Reference, Taglicht on the Active/Passive Mood Distinction in English, etc.
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  11. Lynne Rudder Baker (1996). Science and the Attitudes: A Reply to Sanford. Behavior and Philosophy 24 (2):187-189.
    Explaining Attitudes was not intended to be hostile to science. Its target is what I called the Standard View, a conception of the attitudes that is held almost universally. The heart of the Standard View is the thesis that beliefs (and other..
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  12. Lynne Rudder Baker (1995). Explaining Attitudes: A Practical Approach to the Mind. Cambridge University Press.
    Explaining Attitudes offers a timely and important challenge to the dominant conception of belief found in the work of such philosophers as Dretske and Fodor. According to this dominant view beliefs, if they exist at all, are constituted by states of the brain. Lynne Rudder Baker rejects this view and replaces it with a quite different approach - practical realism. Seen from the perspective of practical realism, any argument that interprets beliefs as either brain states or states of immaterial souls (...)
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  13. John A. Barnden (1992). Connectionism, Generalization, and Propositional Attitudes: A Catalogue of Challenging Issues. In J. Dinsmore (ed.), The Symbolic and Connectionist Paradigms: Closing the Gap. Lawrence Erlbaum. 149--178.
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  14. Jon Barwise & Yiannis N. Moschovakis (1978). Global Inductive Definability. Journal of Symbolic Logic 43 (3):521-534.
    We show that several theorems on ordinal bounds in different parts of logic are simple consequences of a basic result in the theory of global inductive definitions.
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  15. Jon Barwise & John Perry (1985). Shifting Situations and Shaken Attitudes. Linguistics and Philosophy 8 (1):105--161.
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  16. Jon Barwise & John Perry (1981). Situations and Attitudes. Journal of Philosophy 78 (11):668-691.
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  17. Wolfgang Barz (2011). Singuläre Propositionen und das Fassen eines Gedankens. Allgemeine Zeitschrift für Philosophie 36 (1):71-93.
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  18. Rainer Bäuerle & Max J. Cresswell (1989). Propositional Attitudes. In Dov Gabbay & Franz Guenthner (eds.), Handbook of Philosophical Logic. Kluwer. 491--512.
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  19. S. Beck (1988). Lewis, Loar and the Logical Form of Attitude Ascriptions. South African Journal of Philosophy 7 (2):100-104.
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  20. Delia Belleri (2013). On What is Effable. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 2 (4):341-349.
    The Effability thesis has it that all propositions can be encoded by a sentence. By contrast, the Ineffability thesis has it that no proposition can be encoded by a sentence. In this article, I undermine an important motivation for the Ineffability thesis and advance a proposal concerning what is effable and what is not. My strategy will be as follows: First, I'll note that the Ineffability thesis assumes that propositions/thoughts are determinate. I'll point out that propositions/thoughts qua the things we (...)
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  21. Ann Bezuidenhout (2000). Attitude Ascriptions, Context and Interpretive Resemblance. In K. Jaszczolt (ed.), The Pragmatics of Propositional Attitude Reports. Elsevier.
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  22. Anne Bezuidenhout (1997). „How Context-Dependent Are Attitude Ascriptions?‟ In: D. Jutronic. In Dunja Jutronic (ed.), The Maribor Papers in Naturalized Semantics. Maribor.
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  23. Michael Bishop & Dominic Murphy (eds.) (2009). Stich and His Critics. Blackwell.
    Through a challenging collection of original new essays from leading philosophical scholars, the text explores some of philosophy's most hotly-debated contemporary topics, including mental representation, theory of mind, nativism, moral ...
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  24. George Y. Bizer, Jamie C. Barden & Richard E. Petty (2003). Attitudes. In L. Nadel (ed.), Encyclopedia of Cognitive Science. Nature Publishing Group.
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  25. O. Black (1996). Infinite Regress Arguments and Infinite Regresses. Acta Analytica 16:17.
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  26. Alexander Bochman (2000). Belief Contraction as Nonmonotonic Inference. Journal of Symbolic Logic 65 (2):605-626.
    A notion of an epistemic state is introduced as a generalization of common representations suggested for belief change. Based on it, a new kind of nonmonotonic inference relation corresponding to belief contractions is defined. A number of representation results is established that cover both traditional AGM contractions and contractions that do not satisfy recovery.
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  27. Steven E. Boër (2009). Propositions and the Substitution Anomaly. Journal of Philosophical Logic 38 (5):549 - 586.
    The Substitution Anomaly is the failure of intuitively coreferential expressions of the corresponding forms “that S” and “the proposition that S” to be intersubstitutable salva veritate under certain ‘selective’ attitudinal verbs that grammatically accept both sorts of terms as complements. The Substitution Anomaly poses a direct threat to the basic assumptions of Millianism, which predict the interchangeability of “that S” and “the proposition that S”. Jeffrey King has argued persuasively that the most plausible Millian solution is to treat the selective (...)
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  28. Ivan Boh (1984). Propositional Attitudes in the Logic of Walter Burley and William Ockham. Franciscan Studies 44 (1):31-59.
  29. Paolo Bonardi (2007). On Schiffer's Arguments Against the Fregean Model of 'That-Clauses': A Comment on Vignolo. Abstracta 3 (2):162-175.
    In “Propositions: What They Could and What They Could Not Be”, Massimiliano Vignolo counters the arguments put forward by Stephen Schiffer (“The Things We Mean”) against the so-called Fregean model of ‘that’-clauses. My purpose here is to show that some of Vignolo’s objections to Schiffer’s arguments do not hit the mark. I shall also present a new argument against the Fregean model, which takes its cue from two of Schiffer’s arguments.
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  30. Bernard Bosanquet (1910). On a Defect in the Customary Logical Formulation of Inductive Reasoning. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 11:29 - 40.
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  31. M. C. Bradley (1977). Stove on Hume. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 55 (1):69 – 73.
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  32. Richard Bradley (2008). Comparing Evaluations. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 108 (1part1):85-100.
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  33. Paul Brockelman (1977). Behavior and Belief. Philosophy Today 21 (2):168-183.
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  34. John Broome (1991). Desire, Belief and Expectation. Mind 100 (2):265-267.
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  35. Anthony Brueckner (2008). Wright on the McKinsey Problem. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 76 (2):385-391.
    The McKinsey Problem concerns a puzzling implication of the doctrines of Content Externalism and Privileged Access. I provide a categorization of possible solutions to the problem. Then I discuss Crispin Wright’s work on the problem. I argue that Wright has misconceived the status of his own proferred solution to the problem.
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  36. OtÁ Bueno & Vio Colyvan (2003). Paradox Without Satisfaction. Analysis 63 (278):152-156.
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  37. N. F. Bunnin (1973). Mind and Belief. Philosophical Books 14 (3):6-8.
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  38. Arthur W. Burks (1953). The Presupposition Theory of Induction. Philosophy of Science 20 (3):177-197.
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  39. Delilah Caldwell (2009). The Measure of Mind: Propositional Attitudes and Their Attribution. Philosophical Psychology 22 (6):812 – 816.
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  40. J. Campbell (2009). What Does Rationality Have to Do with Psychological Causation? Propositional Attitudes as Mechanisms and as Control Variables. In Matthew Broome Lisa Bortolotti (ed.), Psychiatry as Cognitive Neuroscience: Philosophical Perspectives. Oup Oxford. 137--149.
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  41. A. Capone (2001). Review of “Discourse, Beliefs and Intentions: Semantic Defaults and Propositional Attitude Ascription” by Katarzyna M. Jaszczolt. [REVIEW] Pragmatics and Cognition 9 (2):365-372.
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  42. A. Capone & N. Feit (eds.) (2013). Attitudes De Se. University of Chicago.
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  43. Peter Carruthers, Jill Boucher & Jane Heal (1999). Reviews-Language and Thought: Interdisciplinary Themes. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 50 (2):305-308.
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  44. Roberto Casati & Elena Pasquinelli (2007). How Can You Be Surprised? The Case for Volatile Expectations. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 6 (1-2):171-183.
    Surprise has been characterized has an emotional reaction to an upset belief having a heuristic role and playing a criterial role for belief ascription. The discussion of cases of diachronic and synchronic violations of coherence suggests that surprise plays an epistemic role and provides subjects with some sort of phenomenological access to their subpersonal doxastic states. Lack of surprise seems not to have the same epistemic power. A distinction between belief and expectation is introduced in order to account for some (...)
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  45. Quassim Cassam (2010). Judging, Believing and Thinking. Philosophical Issues 20 (1):80-95.
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  46. Hector-Neri Castaneda (1987). Self-Consciousness, Demonstrative Reference, and the Self-Ascription View of Believing. Philosophical Perspectives 1:405-454.
  47. Peter Caws (1975). Thought, Language and Philosophy. In Don Ihde & Richard M. Zaner (eds.), Dialogues in Phenomenology. Martinus Nijhoff. 49--63.
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  48. K. -Y. Cheng (1997). Baker, LR-Explaining Attitudes. Philosophical Books 38:121-122.
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  49. Roderick Chisholm (1989). Why Singular Propositions. In John Perry, J. Almog & Howard K. Wettstein (eds.), Themes From Kaplan. Oxford University Press. 145--150.
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  50. Alonzo Church (1950). On Carnap's Analysis of Statements of Assertion and Belief. Analysis 10 (5):97 - 99.
    The intent of the article is to point out an objection against analyses that attempt to eliminate propositions and replace them with sentences. (staff).
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