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  1. T. T. A. (1962). Life and the Universe. [REVIEW] Review of Metaphysics 15 (3):526-526.
  2. M. Shahid Alam, Pragmatic Arguments in the Qur'an for Belief.
  3. Hartley B. Alexander (1918). Metaphysics as a Fine Art. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 15 (18):477-481.
  4. Anne L. Alstott (2012). “A Fine is Not a Price”: Insights for Law. In Jon Hanson & John Jost (eds.), Ideology, Psychology, and Law. Oup Usa. pp. 185.
  5. P. Bartha (2007). Taking Stock of Infinite Value: Pascal’s Wager and Relative Utilities. Synthese 154 (1):5-52.
  6. Siegfried Benkner, Franz Franchetti, Hans Michael Gerndt & Jeffrey K. Hollingsworth, Automatic Application Tuning for HPC Architectures (Dagstuhl Seminar 13401).
    This report documents the program and the outcomes of Dagstuhl Seminar 13401 "Automatic Application Tuning for HPC Architectures". This workshop featured a series of talks and four breakout sessions on hot topics in the are of autotuning. The field of autotuning for HPC applications is of growing interest and many research groups around the world are currently involved. However, the field is still rapidly evolving with many different approaching being taken to autotuning. This workshop provided an opportunity to discuss these (...)
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  7. Ophelia Benson (2008). Fine Words Butter No Parsnips? The Philosophers' Magazine 42:18-19.
  8. Sergio Benvenuto (2010). Freud, Il Fine E la Fine. Ágalma: Rivista di studi culturali e di estetica 19.
  9. R. Bertacchini (1998). Futurismo: Fine dell'esilio E riscoperta. Studium 94 (4):583-594.
  10. John Billingham (ed.) (1981). Life in the Universe. MIT Press.
  11. Simon Blackburn (2008). Wager. In exploring philosophy of religion.
  12. Klaas Bom (2015). Blaise Pascal on Duplicity, Sin and the Fall: The Secret Instinct by William Wood , Vi + 243 Pp. Modern Theology 31 (2):362-363.
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  13. Alessandro Bonucci (1915). Il Fine Dello Stato. Mind 24 (96):566-569.
  14. B. Bosanquet (1915). BONUCCI, ALESSANDRO. - Il Fine Dello Stato. [REVIEW] Mind 24:566.
  15. Ann Boyd (2013). Treatment Option or Pharmacological Wager? Journal of Clinical Research and Bioethics 4 (4).
  16. R. M. Burns (1981). The Great Debate on Miracles: From Joseph Glanvill to David Hume. Associated University Presses.
  17. A. B. Carter (2002). Is the Wager Back On? A Response to Douglas Groothuis. Philosophia Christi 4 (2):493-500.
  18. Jason W. Carter (2012). One Book, the Whole Universe. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 86 (1):170-173.
  19. Charles Cassini (2013). Is Hume's Critique of Induction Self‐Defeating? Heythrop Journal 55 (1).
  20. Hiram Caton (1986). Pascal's Syndrome: Positivism as a Symptom of Depression and Mania. Zygon 21 (3):319-351.
    . The present study applies results and methods of psychobiology to intellectual history. Pascal's syndrome is a depressive neurosis associated with morbid effects of scientific certainty. The syndrome is characterized by self‐mortification and conversion experience that represses distressing certainties. The dynamics of the syndrome are assessed from Blake Pascal's psychosis. The ideation of the syndrome is evaluated by reference to the neurology of altered states of consciousness and the biogenic amine hypothesis of depression and mania. The evaluation yields a description (...)
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  21. Isaac Choi (2016). Is Petitionary Prayer Superfluous? Oxford Studies in Philosophy of Religion 7:32-62.
    Why would God institute the practice of efficacious petitionary prayer? Why would God not simply give us what we need before we ask? I examine recently proposed solutions to this puzzle and argue that they are inadequate to explain why an omniscient and perfectly good God would act differently in response to prayer. I propose that God has reasons to not always maximize a creature’s good, even in a sinless world, and that petitionary prayer functions as a means to reward (...)
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  22. Tom Conley (2010). "There's a New World Here": Pantagruel Via Oronce Finé. In Christie McDonald & Susan Rubin Suleiman (eds.), French Global: A New Approach to Literary History. Columbia University Press.
  23. Jim W. Corder (1981). A Speech About Comanches and Miracles Made to Premedical Students Who Are Not as Scary as Doctors. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 24 (2):189-194.
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  24. Jayne Cortez (1979). Big Fine Woman From Ruleville. Feminist Studies 5 (3):462.
  25. John G. Cramer, Other Universes II.
    My previous Alternate View column (ANALOG 9/84) described the widely accepted "inflationary scenario" of modern cosmology in which our Universe is just one among very many "bubble universes", all popping out of the general medium of the Big Bang like bubbles forming in a glass of beer. Somewhere perhaps there are many universes more or less like ours, some very similar to and others radically different from the universe we call "home".
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  26. Deborah De Chiara-Quenzer (1994). Commentary on Fine. Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 10 (1):244-255.
  27. Inmacula de Melo-martín (2006). Biotechnology: Tweaking Here, Tuning There. Is That All We Need? Philosophy Now 56:35-37.
  28. Ann T. Delehanty (2004). Morality and Method in Pascal's. Philosophy and Literature 28 (1).
    : This essay argues that Pascal's work both questions the accuracy of perspective in an infinite universe, and describes a model for moral truth that escapes the limitations of perspective. This model, rooted in Christianity, requires a total reorientation of approach towards moral truth. By asserting the limits of rational method, making use of recent scientific developments, and constructing a new model for moral truth, Pascal's work sought to update the role of Christianity to be not only consonant with the (...)
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  29. Dan Dennis (2011). Evil, Fine-Tuning and the Creation of the Universe. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 70 (2):139-145.
    Could God have created a better universe? Well, the fundamental scientific laws and parameters of the universe have to be within a certain miniscule range, for a life-sustaining universe to develop: the universe must be ‘Fine Tuned’. Therefore the ‘embryonic universe’ that came into existence with the ‘big bang’ had to be either exactly as it was or within a certain tiny range, for there to develop a life-sustaining universe. If it is better that there exist a life-sustaining universe than (...)
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  30. Clement Dore (2016). Science and Supernaturalism. Think 15 (42):35-52.
    In the first section of this paper, I discuss a quantum mechanical account, which is endorsed by the MIT physicist, Alan Guth, of the origin of what Guth believes to have been an absolutely first universe. I argue that, though his explanation is unsound, there is no reason to think that it needs to be replaced by a supernaturalist one. In the second section, I argue that though Professor Steven Weinberg's tentative explanation of the apparent fine-tuning of the cosmological constant (...)
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  31. John Dupré (2012). A Fine Book, but Who's It For? Metascience 21 (1):175-177.
    A fine book, but who’s it for? Content Type Journal Article Pages 1-3 DOI 10.1007/s11016-011-9582-9 Authors John Dupré, ESRC Centre for Genomics in Society (Egenis), University of Exeter, Byrne House, St. German’s Road, Exeter, EX4 4PJ UK Journal Metascience Online ISSN 1467-9981 Print ISSN 0815-0796.
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  32. William E. Evenson (2012). "Strengthening Student Learning Through" Tuning". Synesis: A Journal of Science, Technology, Ethics and Policy 3 (1).
  33. Arthur Fine (1999). Fine Sense of Mischief. The Philosophers' Magazine 5 (5):47-48.
  34. Antony Flew (1990). Universes. Philosophical Books 31 (3):158-160.
  35. Paul Franceschi, Http://Www.Univ-Corse.Fr/~Franceschi.
    Infinite Minds is the fourth book of John Leslie, which follows Value and Existence (1979), Universes (1989) and The End of the World (1996). Infinite Minds presents a very rich content, and covers a number of particularly varied subjects . Among these latter, one can notably mention: omniscience, the problem of Evil, the fine-tuning argument, observational selection effects, the identity of indiscernables, time, infiniteness, the nature of consciousness.
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  36. Paul Franceschi, A Brief Introduction to N-Universes.
    I describe in this paper the basic elements of the n-universes, a methodological tool originally introduced in Franceschi (2001) in the context of the study of Goodman's paradox. As the n-universes can be used in wide-ranging applications, such as thought experiments, I describe them from an essentially pragmatic standpoint, i.e. by describing accurately the step-by-step process which leads to a given modelisation.
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  37. James Franklin (2001). The Science of Conjecture: Probability Before Pascal: Contents. Johns Hopkins University Press.
    The Dark Ages The Gregorian Revolution The Glossators Invent "Half-Proof" Presumptions in Canon Law Innocent III Grades of Evidence, and Torture The Post-Glossators Bartolus and Baldus: The Completed Theory The Inquisition Maimonides on Testimony Law in the East Ch. 3 Renaissance Law..
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  38. Gilbert Fulmer (2001). A Fatal Logical Flaw in Anthropic Principle Design Arguments. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 49 (2):101-110.
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  39. Jerome I. Gellman (1996). Jeff Jordan and Daniel Howards-Snyder, Eds., Faith, Freedom, and Rationality, Philosophy of Religion Today Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 16 (5):355-357.
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  40. On Genuine & Territorial Demarcation (2013). Loki's Wager and Laudan's Error. In Massimo Pigliucci & Maarten Boudry (eds.), Philosophy of Pseudoscience: Reconsidering the Demarcation Problem. University of Chicago Press. pp. 79.
  41. Joshua Lewis Golding (1982). Pragmatic Justification of Religious Faith. Dissertation, University of Pittsburgh
    Pascal's Wager is analyzed and critiqued in Part I. The main objections to Pascal's argument are raised and various attempts to salvage the argument are discussed. These problems include the dubious assumption that one is forced to believe either that God exists or that God does not exist, and the questionable assumption that one will gain infinite happiness if and only if God exists and one believes in God's existence. Also problematic is the use of an infinite value in an (...)
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  42. Barry Gower (1991). Hume on Probability. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 42 (1):1-19.
  43. Ian Hacking (1987). The Inverse Gambler's Fallacy: The Argument From Design. The Anthropic Principle Applied to Wheeler Universes. Mind 96 (383):331-340.
  44. Ian Hacking (1978). Hume's Species of Probability. Philosophical Studies 33 (1):21 - 37.
  45. Anne L. Haehl (2002). Walking a Fine Line. Hastings Center Report 32 (1):6.
  46. Fred W. Hallberg (1988). Barrow and Tipler's Anthropic Cosmological Principle. Zygon 23 (2):139-157.
  47. Hans Halvorson, A Probability Problem in the Fine-Tuning Argument.
    According to the fine-tuning argument: the probability of a life-permitting universe, conditional on the non-existence of God, is low; and the probability of a life-permitting universe, conditional on the existence of God, is high. I demonstrate that these two claims cannot be simultaneously justified. In particular, if there are good reasons for a non-theist to think that the probability of a life-permitting universe is low, then these are also good reasons for a theist.
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  48. John Hawthorn (1988). Not a Metatheorem, in Fine. Mind 97 (388):585-587.
  49. Sue Healey (2005). Navigating Fine Lines. In Robin Grove, Kate Stevens & Shirley McKechnie (eds.), Thinking in Four Dimensions: Creativity and Cognition in Contemporary Dance. Melbourne Up. pp. 57--80.
  50. B. L. Hebblethwaite (1986). Mellor's ‘Bridge–Hand’ Argument. Religious Studies 22 (3-4):473.
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